Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
49Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Care of Patients with IV therapy

Care of Patients with IV therapy

Ratings:

4.76

(25)
|Views: 15,739 |Likes:
Published by Marcus, RN

More info:

Published by: Marcus, RN on Sep 21, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/26/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CARE OF PATIENTS WITH INTRAVENOUS THERAPY
 
Intravenous Therapy
– the administration / introduction of fluids directly into the veinPurposes / Rationale / Goals:a.
 
Maintain & replace body stores of water, electrolytes, vitamins, proteins, fate & calorieswhen patient or client cannot maintain an adequate intake by mouthb.
 
Restore acid-base balancec.
 
Restore volume of blood componentsd.
 
Provide avenue for the administration of medicatione.
 
Provide nutrition while resting the GI TractEquipment Needed:a.
 
IV Fluid – in bottle or plastic containerb.
 
Tubingc.
 
Needle / Catheter – in different sizes (gauge 14 – 25) or winged, “butterfly” needled.
 
IV Pole / IV Infusion Pumpe.
 
Others – dressing (transparent gauze); tape / plaster; splint / armboardAdvantages:a.
 
used when patient cannot take oral medicationb.
 
permits accurate dosec.
 
acts instantly – absorbed quickly by the bodyDisadvantages:a.
 
Carries risk like bleeding, infiltration, infection, and allergic reactionsb.
 
Limits patient activitiesc.
 
Costly – costs more than any other drugAdult contain 60% of fluids in the bodyFunctions of Fluid:1.
 
Intracellular – 55% of total body fluid2.
 
Extracellular – 45% of total body fluida.
 
Interstitial Fluidsb.
 
CSF – Cerebro Spinal Fluidc.
 
PlasmaKinds of IV Solutions:
 
1. Isotonic solution – has the same osmolarity as serum and other body fluids, hence, itstays where it is infused (intravascular space). It expands thiscompartment without pulling the fluid from other compartments(intracellular & interstitial). Example: LR, NSS (0.9 NS). Indication:Blood loss or hypovolemia2. Hypertonic solution – osmolarity is higher than the serum. When infused, it initiallyincreases osmolarity causing the fluid to be pulled from the interstitial& intracellular compartments into the blood vessel (intravascularspace). Example: D50.5NS, D5LR, D5NS. Indication: Regulate urineoutput; stabilize blood pressure; reduce risk of edema; Post-opPatients3. Hypotonic solution – osmolarity is lower than the serum. When infused, fluid shifts out of the blood vessels (intravascular space) into the cells while reducingthe fluid in circulatory system. Example: D0.45NS; 0.33NS; Dextrose2.5% in Water. Indications: Dehydration; DKA; HHNKOsmolarity – no. of particles in a Liter of WaterOsmolality – no. of particles per Kg. of Water
Crystalloid
– clear IV fluid - Hypotonic- Hypertonic- Isotonic
Colloid
– Murky / Black IV FluidParts of IV Tubing:a.
 
Piercing spikeb.
 
Drop orificec.
 
Drip chamberd.
 
Roller clampe.
 
Y-injection site / port – direct injection to the blood vesself.
 
Luer-Lock site
Volume Control Set
– patients at risk with circulatory overload (e.g. infants)- controls the volume of solution that goes through / the amount of medication yougive to the patient
 
Location:Adult- Use Peripheral, Superficial veins- Metacarpal veins – dorsal aspect of hand- Cephalic veins – in line with thumb- Basilic veins – ulnar side- Median Cubita vein – vein that crosses in the cubital region- Great Saphenous vein- Dorsal venous network- Frontal- Superficial temporal- OccipitalChildren- Great Saphenous vein- Dorsal venous networkInfant- Frontal- Superficial Temporal- OccipitalFactors Affecting Rate of Flow1.
 
Pressure gradient – the difference between two levels in a fluid system2.
 
Friction – the interaction between fluid molecules & surfaces of inner wall of tubing3.
 
Diameter & Length of tubing, gauge of cannula4.
 
Height of infusion container – ideal height is 36” or 3 ft. from insertion site5.
 
Size of opening through which fluid leaves receptacle

Activity (49)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Vicka Novri liked this
AmieyNah Mie liked this
Kwek Yun Hui liked this
Faiqa Mansor liked this
Liu Xiuxiu liked this
Jimmy McDaniel liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->