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Social Knowledge and International Policy Making: the Bretton Woods Institutions

Social Knowledge and International Policy Making: the Bretton Woods Institutions

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In considering the manner in which social knowledge is used in policy making in international financial institutions, it is necessary to maintain a broad and comparative approach. It is altogether too easy to start from the conviction that certain international organisations have a negative (or positive) impact on developing countries, and then proceed to show how their use of social knowledge contributes to the type of impact that was assumed in the first place. Demonising some international organisations while idealising others is undoubtedly a very popular pastime, but it is one that generates more heat than light. This paper claims that the production of social knowledge in all international organisations is problematic, because of their nature as a form of public bureaucracy.
In considering the manner in which social knowledge is used in policy making in international financial institutions, it is necessary to maintain a broad and comparative approach. It is altogether too easy to start from the conviction that certain international organisations have a negative (or positive) impact on developing countries, and then proceed to show how their use of social knowledge contributes to the type of impact that was assumed in the first place. Demonising some international organisations while idealising others is undoubtedly a very popular pastime, but it is one that generates more heat than light. This paper claims that the production of social knowledge in all international organisations is problematic, because of their nature as a form of public bureaucracy.

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01/13/2014

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UNRISD
U
NITED
N
ATIONS
R
ESEARCH
I
NSTITUTE FOR
S
OCIAL
D
EVELOPMENT
 
Social Knowledge and International PolicyMaking: the Bretton Woods Institutions
John Toye
prepared for the UNRISD conference on
Social Knowledge and InternationalPolicy Making: Exploring the Linkages
20–21 April 2004 Geneva, SwitzerlandThis draft document isnot for citation or circulationwithout the prior consent of the author(s)
 
 
The
United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD)
is an autonomousagency engaging in multidisciplinary research on the social dimensions of contemporary prob-lems affecting development. Its work is guided by the conviction that, for effective developmentpolicies to be formulated, an understanding of the social and political context is crucial. The In-stitute attempts to provide governments, development agencies, grassroots organizations andscholars with a better understanding of how development policies and processes of economic,social and environmental change affect different social groups. Working through an extensivenetwork of national research centres, UNRISD aims to promote original research and strength-en research capacity in developing countries.Current research programmes include: Civil Society and Social Movements; Democracy, Gov-ernance and Human Rights; Identities, Conflict and Cohesion; Social Policy and Development;and Technology, Business and Society.A list of the Institute’s free and priced publications can be obtained by contacting:
UNRISD Reference Centre
§
Palais des Nations
§
1211 Geneva 10
§
SwitzerlandTel 41 (0)22 9173020
§
Fax 41 (0)22 9170650
§
info@unrisd.org
§
 
www.unrisd.org
Copyright © United Nations Research Institute for Social Development.This is not a formal UNRISD publication. The responsibility for opinions expressed in signed studiesrests solely with their author(s), and availability on the UNRISD website (www.unrisd.org) does notconstitute an endorsement by UNRISD of the opinions expressed in them. No citation, publication or distribution of these papers is permitted without the prior authorization of the author(s).
 
Social knowledge and International Policy Making: the Bretton Woods Institutions
John Toye
*
 In considering the manner in which social knowledge is used in policy making ininternational financial institutions, it is necessary to maintain a broad and comparativeapproach. It is altogether too easy to start from the conviction that certain internationalorganisations have a negative (or positive) impact on developing countries, and then proceed to show how their use of social knowledge contributes to the type of impact thatwas assumed in the first place. Demonising some international organisations whileidealising others is undoubtedly a very popular pastime, but it is one that generates moreheat than light. This paper claims that the production of social knowledge in allinternational organisations is problematic, because of their nature as a form of public bureaucracy. This general claim, advanced as a modification of Weber’s theory of  bureaucracy, is argued in Section I.Section II turns to the World Bank as a case study of the problems of managing socialresearch inside an international public bureaucracy. It argues not only that managerialconstraints exist on what the Bank is willing to publish, but that the binding constraintson publication change over time, depending on managerial objectives and managerialcompetence in exercising editorial control over research output.Section III examines the evolution in managerial objectives at the Bank in recent years,and the factors that have influenced shifts in its rhetoric and policy. In the last decade,the Bank has had to adjust to a variety of pressures from its major sponsors, arising bothfrom geopolitical events and from opposition to particular institutional modes of operation. This leads on to the underlying question of Section IV, which is whether these pressures have brought about a fundamental transformation of attitudes at the Bank.Are we seeing signs of change, or only a change of signs? Recent research on the issuesof poverty reduction, governance and conditionality (policy-based and process based) arediscussed in an effort to gauge how far the Bank has moved.Although the title of this paper refers to the Bretton Woods institutions, the major – though not the exclusive - focus is on the World Bank. This is partly because, untilrecently, the Bank has been more transparent than the International Monetary Fund, andtherefore the evaluation of change can be more soundly based. More importantly, thetwo organisations have quite different institutional objectives and constraints. Becausethere is no single entity called “the BWI”, the focus must be on one, and here it is theBank, as the major generator of social knowledge about development, while the role of the other is noted in contradistinction, as appropriate.
*
Acknowledgement: the first two sections of this paper draws heavily on work done jointly with RichardToye for our co-authored book,
The UN and Global Political Economy
, Bloomington, Indiana UniversityPress, 2004, forthcoming.
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