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Table Of Contents

THE PUBLIC WANTS SCHOOL CHOICE
RECOMMENDED READING
LACK OF COMPETITION
INEFFECTUAL SCHOOL BOARDS
UNION OPPOSITION TO REFORM
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
POLITICAL INTERFERENCE
LACK OF STANDARDS
CENTRALIZED CONTROL AND FUNDING
ANTIACADEMIC CLASSROOM INCENTIVES
CONCLUSION
PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN U.S.HISTORY
DEMOCRATIC VALUES AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS
CAN PARENTS BE INFORMED CONSUMERS?
WHO WOULD EDUCATE THE POOR?
IS COMPETITION IN EDUCATION APPROPRIATE?
A GOOD TIME TO RECONSIDER
THE RISE OF EXCHANGE
THE COORDINATION PROBLEM
HOW CAPITALISM WORKS
ORIGINS IN ENGLAND
THE FOUNDERS’VALUES TODAY
CAPITALIST VERSUS GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS
THE RICH GET RICHER AND THE POOR GET POORER
CAPITALISM CAUSED THE GREAT DEPRESSION
CORPORATIONS EARN OBSCENE PROFITS
CORPORATIONS LIE,CHEAT,AND STEAL
CAPITALISM HARMS THE ENVIRONMENT
MONOPOLIES AND CARTELS ARE COMMON
GLOBALISM HURTS WORKERS AND THE POOR
CAPITALISM REWARDS RACISM AND SEGREGATION
THE REALITY OF GREED AND AMBITION
CAPITALIST VALUES
CAPITALISM AND JUSTICE
UTILITARIANISM AND INCOME REDISTRIBUTION
ONE INSTITUTION AMONG MANY
CAPITALISM AND RELIGION
CAPITALISM AND POSTMODERN VALUES
LIBERTARIANS ARE NOT ANARCHISTS
GOVERNMENT IS FORCE; CAPITALISM IS FREEDOM
CAPITALISM AND POLITICS
CAPITALISM’S DEBT TO THE STATE
CAPITALISM AND INTELLECTUALS
ATTACKS ON ECONOMICS
WHY PEOPLE FEAR ECONOMICS
WHAT IS ECONOMICS?
INDIVIDUALS VERSUS GROUPS
RATIONAL ACTION
THE SUBJECTIVITY OF VALUES
ECONOMICS AND ETHICS
THE ROLE OF ASSUMPTIONS
IDEOLOGY AND ECONOMICS
PUBLIC-CHOICE THEORY
IS INFORMATION AN EXCEPTION?
SCHOOLING AS A MARKET PHENOMENON
MORE THAN A COMMODITY
NOT LIKE BLUEBERRIES
EIGHT PUBLIC-CHOICE PROPOSITIONS
WHY CHOOSE MARKETS?
REFORMS THAT REACH STUDENTS
THE PRIVATIZATION MOVEMENT
CONTRACTING OUT FOR SERVICES
CHARTER SCHOOLS
PRIVATELY FUNDED VOUCHERS
TUITION TAX CREDITS AND DEDUCTIONS
HOMESCHOOLING
SCHOOL VOUCHERS
DEMAND FOR PRIVATE SCHOOLING
PRIVATE SCHOOL CAPACITY WOULD INCREASE
AVOIDING NEW REGULATIONS
CONSTITUTIONALITY
VOUCHERS AS A REFORM STRATEGY
VOUCHERS VERSUS TAX CREDITS
LONG-TERM CONSEQUENCES OF VOUCHERS
CHOICES TO BE MADE
PHASING IN AND INCREMENTALISM
VALUE OF VOUCHERS
TUITION ADD-ONS
FUNDING SOURCES
EDUCATION SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
FISCAL IMPACT
TESTING AND VOUCHERS
VOUCHERS FOR HOMESCHOOLERS
ADMINISTRATION AND VOUCHER REDEMPTION
TRANSPORTATION
Conclusion
THE CHOICE PARADOX
THE NEED FOR SCHOOL REFORM
LET PARENTS AND EDUCATORS DECIDE
GOVERNMENT CONTROL IS NOT INEVITABLE
SEPARATION IN A SINGLE BOUND?
P. 1
Education and Capitalism: How Overcoming Our Fear of Markets and Economics Can Improve America's Schools, edited by Herbert J. Walberg & Joseph L. Bast

Education and Capitalism: How Overcoming Our Fear of Markets and Economics Can Improve America's Schools, edited by Herbert J. Walberg & Joseph L. Bast

Ratings: (0)|Views: 769 |Likes:
Published by Hoover Institution
For parents, teachers, policymakers, taxpayers, and scholars who want better schools for children regardless of their race, social background, or parents' income, this book asserts that, if schools were "privatized" (moved from the public to the private sector), they could once again do a superior job providing kindergarten to twelfth-grade (K–12) education.

Drawing on insights and findings from history, psychology, sociology, political science, and economics, the authors reveal

Why schools and past efforts at school reform have failed
Why capitalism can be trusted to produce safe and effective schools—and why economics is an appropriate tool for studying how schooling is delivered
What history tells us about the government's role in schooling—and why keeping most schooling in the hands of government does not help achieve equality and democracy
How guidelines for voucher programs that protect the poorest and most vulnerable members of society otherwise work as well as their proponents predict
Why conservatives and libertarians should support school voucher programs

The authors show that, unless popular myths about capitalism are challenged, school reform will stall well short of success. Without a broader understanding of how and why markets work, the small steps in the right direction taken at the end of the twentieth century risk being swept away at the start of the twenty-first.
For parents, teachers, policymakers, taxpayers, and scholars who want better schools for children regardless of their race, social background, or parents' income, this book asserts that, if schools were "privatized" (moved from the public to the private sector), they could once again do a superior job providing kindergarten to twelfth-grade (K–12) education.

Drawing on insights and findings from history, psychology, sociology, political science, and economics, the authors reveal

Why schools and past efforts at school reform have failed
Why capitalism can be trusted to produce safe and effective schools—and why economics is an appropriate tool for studying how schooling is delivered
What history tells us about the government's role in schooling—and why keeping most schooling in the hands of government does not help achieve equality and democracy
How guidelines for voucher programs that protect the poorest and most vulnerable members of society otherwise work as well as their proponents predict
Why conservatives and libertarians should support school voucher programs

The authors show that, unless popular myths about capitalism are challenged, school reform will stall well short of success. Without a broader understanding of how and why markets work, the small steps in the right direction taken at the end of the twentieth century risk being swept away at the start of the twenty-first.

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Publish date: Oct 23, 2003
Added to Scribd: Aug 02, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780817939724
List Price: $15.00

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