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Cable 390: 2006 US Embassy Report on the War on Drugs in Brazil

Cable 390: 2006 US Embassy Report on the War on Drugs in Brazil

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Published by Andres
This is a 2006 US embassy report outlining counternarcotics programs and strategies in Brazil.
This is a 2006 US embassy report outlining counternarcotics programs and strategies in Brazil.

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Published by: Andres on Aug 04, 2011
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01/03/2013

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O 221116Z NOV 06FM AMEMBASSY BRASILIA TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 7458UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 06 BRASILIA 002465SUBJECT: BRAZIL 2006 INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICSCONTROL STRATEGY REPORT (INCSR)
REF: STATE 177294¶1. Following is Brazil's 2006 INCSR. As requestedin reftel, the money laundering portion of theINCSR will be submitted separately.
----------¶I. SUMMARY----------
2. The Brazilian Federal police (DPF) had anumber of successes this past year against foreignnarcotrafficking organizations operating withinBrazilian territory, the biggest of which includedthe arrest of a kingpin target in Sao Paulo and theconfiscation of millions of dollars of assets in anumber of countries. Inroads are also starting tobe made against Mexican and Colombian groupsinvolved in sending heroin to the U.S. Attentionis also now being given to groups that illegallysell prescription drugs via the internet. The DPF
 
appears to be placing a higher priority on inter-diction capabilities along the Bolivian border,where there has been a noticeable increase in theamount of cocaine paste that has been seized overthe last year. It is believed that the amountswill continue to grow due to an increase in cocaleaf production.¶3. Brazil is a major transit country for illicitdrugs shipped to Europe and, to a lesser extent, tothe United States. Brazil continues to cooperatewith its South American neighbors in an attempt tocontrol the remote and expansive border areas whereillicit drugs are transported. Brazil is asignatory of various counternarcotics agreementsand treaties, including the 1988 UN Drug Conven-tion, the 1995 bilateral U.S.-Brazil counter-narcotics agreement, and the annual Memorandum ofUnderstanding (MOU) with the U.S.
---------------------II. STATUS OF COUNTRY---------------------
4. While not a significant drug-producingcountry, Brazil is a conduit for cocaine base andcocaine HCL moving from source countries to Europe,the Middle East and Brazilian urban centers, aswell as a conduit for smaller amounts of heroinmoving from source countries to the U.S. andEurope. Cocaine and marijuana is used amongyouths in the country's cities, particularly SaoPaulo and Rio de Janeiro. Powerful and heavily-armed organized drug gangs, located principally in
 
Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, are involved innarcotics related arms trafficking.
------------------------------------------III. COUNTRY ACTIONS AGAINST DRUGS IN 2006------------------------------------------
POLICY INITIATIVES¶5. Brazil has undertaken various bilateral andmultilateral efforts to meet all objectives of the1988 UN Drug Convention, has implemented adequatelegal law enforcement measures, and achievedsignificant progress in the fight against illegaldrugs.¶6. In 2005, the GOB drafted a bill to update itsanti-money laundering legislation. If passed, thisbill, which has not yet been presented to Congress,would facilitate greater law enforcement access tofinancial and banking records duringinvestigations, criminalize illicit enrichment,allow administrative freezing of assets, andfacilitate prosecutions of money laundering casesby amending the legal definition of moneylaundering and making it an autonomous offense.The draft law also allows the Brazilian Govern-ment's interagency financial crimes investigationsunit (COAF) to receive suspicious transactionreports directly from obligated entities, withouttheir first having to pass through the supervisorybodies such as the Central Bank. COAF would alsobe able to request additional information directly

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