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A New Way of Looking at Information Sharing in Supply & Demand chains

A New Way of Looking at Information Sharing in Supply & Demand chains

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Published by Steve Holcombe
The Internet is achieved via layered protocols. Transmitted data, flowing through these layers are enriched with metadata necessary for the correct interpretation of the data presented to users of the Web. Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the Web says, “The Web was originally conceived as a tool for researchers who trusted one another implicitly …. We have been living with the consequences ever since ….” “[We need] to provide Web users with better ways of determining whether material on a site can be trusted ….”

Our lives have nonetheless become better as a result of Web service providers like Google and Facebook. Consumers are now conditioned to believe that they can – or should be able to - search and find information about anything, anytime. But the service providers dictate their quality of service in a one-way conversation that exploits the advantages of the Web as it exists. What may be considered trustworthy content is limited to that which is dictated by the service providers. The result is that consumers cannot find real-time, trustworthy information about much of anything.

Despite all the work in academic research there is still no industry solution that fully supports the sharing of proprietary supply chain product information between “data silos”. Industry remains in the throes of one-up/one down information sharing when what is needed is real-time “whole chain” interoperability. The Web needs to provide two-way, real-time interoperability in the content provided by information producers. Immutable objects have heretofore been traditionally used to provide more efficient data communications between networked machines, but not between information producers. Now researchers are innovatively coming up with new ways of using immutable objects in interoperable, two-way communications between information content providers.

Pardalis' protocols for immutable informational objects make possible a value chain of two-way, interoperable sharing that makes information more available, trustworthy, and traceable. This, in turn, incentivizes increases in the quality and availability of new information leading to new business models.
The Internet is achieved via layered protocols. Transmitted data, flowing through these layers are enriched with metadata necessary for the correct interpretation of the data presented to users of the Web. Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the Web says, “The Web was originally conceived as a tool for researchers who trusted one another implicitly …. We have been living with the consequences ever since ….” “[We need] to provide Web users with better ways of determining whether material on a site can be trusted ….”

Our lives have nonetheless become better as a result of Web service providers like Google and Facebook. Consumers are now conditioned to believe that they can – or should be able to - search and find information about anything, anytime. But the service providers dictate their quality of service in a one-way conversation that exploits the advantages of the Web as it exists. What may be considered trustworthy content is limited to that which is dictated by the service providers. The result is that consumers cannot find real-time, trustworthy information about much of anything.

Despite all the work in academic research there is still no industry solution that fully supports the sharing of proprietary supply chain product information between “data silos”. Industry remains in the throes of one-up/one down information sharing when what is needed is real-time “whole chain” interoperability. The Web needs to provide two-way, real-time interoperability in the content provided by information producers. Immutable objects have heretofore been traditionally used to provide more efficient data communications between networked machines, but not between information producers. Now researchers are innovatively coming up with new ways of using immutable objects in interoperable, two-way communications between information content providers.

Pardalis' protocols for immutable informational objects make possible a value chain of two-way, interoperable sharing that makes information more available, trustworthy, and traceable. This, in turn, incentivizes increases in the quality and availability of new information leading to new business models.

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Published by: Steve Holcombe on Aug 05, 2011
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02/01/2013

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A New Way of Looking at InformationSharing in Supply/Demand Chains
Steve Holcombe, CEOPardalis Inc.
5 August 2011
Two-way Information
more Interoperable
 
Broadly Perceived Benefits of the Internet
Consumers’ lives have become better on the net as a result of the great service that Google provides.
Because of Google, consumers and supply chain participants are now conditioned to believe that they can search and findinformation about anything, anytime!
Facebookhas turned the concept of user-centric information sharing into a product that ordinary computer users canunderstand. Because of Facebook,
consumers and supply chain participants are now conditioned to believe that theycan directly find information about anything, anytime from their
“trusted Friends”
.Multi-tenancy
of “Friends”
Web pages
This is great! I canfind anything, anytime on the Web!
This is great! I can
find anything, anytime from my
trustedFriends
!
Wait a minute ….
What do you mean
you can’t tell me
where this great foodoriginated from?!
 
Comments from Tim Berners-Lee
“*We need+ to provide Web users with better ways of 
determining whether material on a site can be
trusted 
. Howcan we determine whether we can
trust 
the materialemanating from a site?
The Web was originally conceived as a tool for researchers
who trusted one another implicitly 
…. We have been living withthe consequences ever since.”
[S]ubstantialresearch should be devoted to engineeringlayers of 
trust and provenance
into Web interactions.”
emphasesadded 
).

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