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Integrating Human Rights in the Anti-Corruption Agenda : Challenges, Possibilities and Opportunities

Integrating Human Rights in the Anti-Corruption Agenda : Challenges, Possibilities and Opportunities

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A taboo subject until the early 1990s, corruption is now under the spotlight and recognised as one of the biggest obstacles to development. Anti-corruption laws have been enacted, treaties like the United Nations Convention against Corruption have been negotiated and ratified and new anti-corruption bodies are springing up. Citizens across the world publicly protest against corruption. Corrupt acts are sometimes brought out of the shadows and prosecuted, and on occasion, those responsible are punished.
These are tangible achievements. Nevertheless, persistent corruption continues to flourish in many environments to the severe detriment of many millions of people. Against this background, many anti-corruption organisations are examining and revising their strategies in a search for more effective solutions.
This report contributes to that quest, outlining how the use of a human rights framework can strengthen anti-corruption work at the national and local level. Which human rights principles and tools could most improve the impact of anti-corruption programmes? How can we harness the power of human rights to protect those most vulnerable to corruption? Where might human rights and anti-corruption programmes be in conflict? This report shows how human rights and anti-corruption practitioners can unite efforts and effectively collaborate in the struggle to root out entrenched corruption.
A taboo subject until the early 1990s, corruption is now under the spotlight and recognised as one of the biggest obstacles to development. Anti-corruption laws have been enacted, treaties like the United Nations Convention against Corruption have been negotiated and ratified and new anti-corruption bodies are springing up. Citizens across the world publicly protest against corruption. Corrupt acts are sometimes brought out of the shadows and prosecuted, and on occasion, those responsible are punished.
These are tangible achievements. Nevertheless, persistent corruption continues to flourish in many environments to the severe detriment of many millions of people. Against this background, many anti-corruption organisations are examining and revising their strategies in a search for more effective solutions.
This report contributes to that quest, outlining how the use of a human rights framework can strengthen anti-corruption work at the national and local level. Which human rights principles and tools could most improve the impact of anti-corruption programmes? How can we harness the power of human rights to protect those most vulnerable to corruption? Where might human rights and anti-corruption programmes be in conflict? This report shows how human rights and anti-corruption practitioners can unite efforts and effectively collaborate in the struggle to root out entrenched corruption.

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Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: International Council on Human Rights Policy on Aug 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/12/2011

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Integrating Human Rightsin the Anti-Corruption Agenda
Challenges, Possibilitiesand Opportunities
the coalition against corruption
 
Intrnationa Counci on Human Rights Poicy
The International Council on Human Rights Policy (ICHRP) was establishedin Geneva in 1998 to conduct applied research into current human rightsissues. Its research is designed to be o practical relevance to policy-makers ininternational and regional organisations, in governments and inter-governmentalagencies and in voluntary organisations o all kinds. The ICHRP is independent,international in its membership and participatory in its approach. It is registeredas a non-prot oundation under Swiss law.
© Maxime Gauvinwww.iStockphoto.comSpider web
Cover illustration
M
eMbers
 
of
 
the
 
international
 
council
Lydia Alpizar Duran (Costa Rica)Roberta Clarke (Trinidad & Tobago)Lyse Doucet (Canada)Roger Raupp Rios (Brazil)Wilder Tayler* (Uruguay)Devendra Raj Panday (Nepal)Fateh Azzam* (Palestine)Marco Sassoli* (Switzerland)Hina Jilani* (Pakistan) – ChairJelena Pejic (Serbia)Fouad Abdelmoumni (Morocco)Juan Mendez (Argentina)Chidi Anselm Odinkalu* (Nigeria)Maggie Beirne* (United Kingdom)Usha Ramanathan (India)Cynthia Brown (United States)Ghanim Al-Najjar (Kuwait)Emma Playair* (United Kingdom)
*Board Member 
Transparncy Intrnationa
Transparency International is the global civil society organisation leading theght against corruption. Through more than 90 chapters worldwide and aninternational secretariat in Berlin, Germany, Transparency International raisesawareness o the damaging eects o corruption and works with partners ingovernment, business and civil society to develop and implement eectivemeasures to tackle it.
 
Irai Ha Rihi h Ai-Corrpio Aa:Cha, Poiiii a Opporii

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