P. 1
Climate Change and Human Rights - A Rough Guide

Climate Change and Human Rights - A Rough Guide

Ratings: (0)|Views: 61 |Likes:
To address climate change effectively will require a transformation of global policy capacity − from information-gathering and collective decision-making to law enforcement and resource distribution. Human rights law is relevant because climate change causes human rights violations. But a human rights lens can also be helpful in approaching and managing climate change. The human rights framework reminds us that climate change is about suffering – about
the human misery that results directly from the damage we are doing to nature. … As this report makes clear, if we build human rights criteria into our future planning, we will better understand who is at risk and how we should act to protect them.
From the Foreword by Mary Robinson

“This report is the first systematic treatment of [this subject]. It is at the same time a concise and lucid analysis of the social, economic, legal and ethical impact of expected climate changes. It should be of interest to specialists and generalists alike.”
Dharam Ghai, Former Director, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development

“Excellent.”
Tariq Banuri, Senior Fellow, Stockholm Environmental Institute

“Very good ... an important contribution to the human rights-climate change dialogue, not least in how it sets out
a pragmatic agenda that can be addressed by countries.”
John Drexhage, Director, Climate Change and Energy Program, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

“A thoughtful and thorough report.”
Wolfgang Sachs, Director, Globalization and Sustainability Program,Wuppertal Institute, and Professor, University of Kassel, Germany

“A really useful piece of work … Its nuance and clarity about difficult subjects will be invaluable to anyone looking for help with the ethical dilemmas of climate change.”
Benito Müller, Director, Energy and Environment,Oxford Institute for Energy Studies
To address climate change effectively will require a transformation of global policy capacity − from information-gathering and collective decision-making to law enforcement and resource distribution. Human rights law is relevant because climate change causes human rights violations. But a human rights lens can also be helpful in approaching and managing climate change. The human rights framework reminds us that climate change is about suffering – about
the human misery that results directly from the damage we are doing to nature. … As this report makes clear, if we build human rights criteria into our future planning, we will better understand who is at risk and how we should act to protect them.
From the Foreword by Mary Robinson

“This report is the first systematic treatment of [this subject]. It is at the same time a concise and lucid analysis of the social, economic, legal and ethical impact of expected climate changes. It should be of interest to specialists and generalists alike.”
Dharam Ghai, Former Director, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development

“Excellent.”
Tariq Banuri, Senior Fellow, Stockholm Environmental Institute

“Very good ... an important contribution to the human rights-climate change dialogue, not least in how it sets out
a pragmatic agenda that can be addressed by countries.”
John Drexhage, Director, Climate Change and Energy Program, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

“A thoughtful and thorough report.”
Wolfgang Sachs, Director, Globalization and Sustainability Program,Wuppertal Institute, and Professor, University of Kassel, Germany

“A really useful piece of work … Its nuance and clarity about difficult subjects will be invaluable to anyone looking for help with the ethical dilemmas of climate change.”
Benito Müller, Director, Energy and Environment,Oxford Institute for Energy Studies

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: International Council on Human Rights Policy on Aug 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/08/2013

pdf

 
Cima Chaga Hma Righ
 A Rgh Gi
 
Iraia Cci  Hma Righ Picy
The International Council on Human Rights Policy was established in Geneva in1998 to conduct applied research into current human rights issues. Its researchis designed to be o practical relevance to policy-makers in international andregional organisations, in governments and inter-governmental agencies, andin voluntary organisations o all kinds. The Council is independent, internationalin its membership, and participatory in its approach. It is registered as a non-prot oundation under Swiss law.
Cima chag a h Iraia Cci
The International Council added climate change to its research programmein 2007. In addition to this report, which maps the links between human rightsand climate change, the Council will prepare a second project in 2008-09 thatwill examine one issue in more depth. (As this report went to press, humanrights questions associated with transer o technology was the most likelytheme.) In addition, the Council is editing a book o articles on climate changeand human rights that will be published by Cambridge University Press in2009. For more inormation about these pieces o work, please contact theInternational Council or Stephen Humphreys, the Research Director responsible(at humphreys@ichrp.org).
© The Trustees o the BritishMuseum. Suzuki Shuitsu,Enjoying the Evening Coolby the Dry Riverbed at Shij.A hanging scroll painting.Japan. Late Edo period,early 19th century AD.
Cover illustration
 
Cima Chag a Hma Righ: A Rgh Gi

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->