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Hoover Institution Newsletter - Fall 2005

Hoover Institution Newsletter - Fall 2005

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Published by Hoover Institution
-Senior Fellow Kevin M. Murphy named MacArthur fellow
-Russian minister of foreign affairs cites partnership, shared challenges of Russia and United States in talk
-Distinguished Visiting Fellow Diane Ravitch honored with two awards
-Uncommon Knowledge™'s final bow creates treasure trove for scholars
-Hoover's Nobel laureates discuss current economic challenges
-Senior Fellow Kevin M. Murphy named MacArthur fellow
-Russian minister of foreign affairs cites partnership, shared challenges of Russia and United States in talk
-Distinguished Visiting Fellow Diane Ravitch honored with two awards
-Uncommon Knowledge™'s final bow creates treasure trove for scholars
-Hoover's Nobel laureates discuss current economic challenges

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Published by: Hoover Institution on Aug 11, 2011
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H
oover Institution senior fellowKevin M. Murphy was namedone of 25 MacArthur Fellows for 2005by the John D. and Catherine T.MacArthur Foundation on September20.He also is the George J. Stigler Dis-tinguished Service Professor at the Uni-versity of Chicago’s Graduate School of Business.Murphy is a wide-ranging economistwith an aptitude for applying carefulempirical analyses within rigorous the-oretical frameworks to economic ques-tions of immense social import. Earlyin his career,Murphy identified howtrends inwage in-equalityreflect un-derlyingchanges indemand forlabor. Thesestudies notonly consid-ered suchvariables aswork experience, education, race, andgender but also highlighted the impor-tance of within-group wage variabilityin understanding labor economics.Murphy also considered the phenom-enon of addiction from an economic
R
ussian minister of foreign affairsSergey Lavrov lauded the promis-ing partnership between his countryand the United States when he spoke atadinner at the Hoover Institution onSeptember 20.“Moscow and Washington are tiedtogether by so much,” Lavrov said.“We both have a special responsibilityfor the future of the world. This part-nership needs to move now to positiveaction. Of immediate concernis inter-national terrorism, drug trafficking,organized crime. It makes no sense totry to respond to these threats andchallenges on a unilateral basis. An ef-fective response to threats and chal-lenges is only possible through collec-tive efforts of the entire world commu-nity.”Foreign Minister Lavrov was intro-duced by George P. Shultz, former U.S.
S
ENIOR 
F
ELLOW 
EVIN
M. M
URPHY NAMED
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 AC
 A 
RTHUR 
F
ELLOW 
USSIAN MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS CITESPARTNERSHIP
,
SHARED CHALLENGES OF
USSIA  AND
U
NITED
S
TATES IN TALK 
Fall 2005
continued on page 10
Newsletter 
HOOVER INSTITUTION
Go
online
withHOOVER 
at www.hoover.org to see
What's New,
aguide to the very latest news,features,and events of the Hoover Institution,updated daily.
Russian minister of foreign affairs Sergey Lavrov (left) and Hoover distinguishedfellow George P.Shultz examine materials on international affairs before theSeptember 20 dinner.Kevin M. Murphy
      C    o    u    r     t    e    s    y     M    a    c     A    r     t      h    u    r     F    o    u    n      d    a     t      i    o    n    p      h    o     t    o    c    r    e      d      i     t    :     V      i    s    u    a      l     A    r     t      S    e    r    v      i    c    e    s
INSIDE
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ISTINGUISHED
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ISITING
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D
IANE
AVITCH
H
ONOREDWITH
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A
WARDS
. . . . . . . . . . . 3
NCOMMON 
NOWLEDGE 
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S FINALBOW CREATES TREASURE TROVEFOR SCHOLARS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6H
OOVER 
'
S
N
OBEL LAUREATESDISCUSS CURRENT ECONOMICCHALLENGES
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
continued on page 13
 
2
T
heSociety of American Archivists’ 2005 Fellows’ ErnstPosner Award was presented to the Hoover Institution’sElena Danielson for her article in the most recent volume of 
The American Archivist.
The award, established in 1982 by the Fellows of theSociety of American Archivists (SAA) and named for formerSAA president Ernst Posner, recognizes an outstanding essaydealing with some facet of archival administration, history,theory, and/or methodology published in SAA’s semiannualjournal.The award was presented to Danielson on August 19,during SAAs 69th annual meeting in New Orleans.Danielson, who was associate director of the Hoover Insti-tution and director of itslibrary and archives, retiringfrom that post on September 2(see below), received the awardfor her essay “Privacy Rightsand the Rights of PoliticalVictims: Implications of theGerman Experience” in volume67o
The American Archivist.
Founded in 1936, the Society of American Archivists isNorth America’s oldest and largest national archival profes-sional association. Moreinformation is available atwww.archivists.org.
Elena Danielson
E
lena S. Danielson, whose distinguished career with theHoover Institution spanned 27 years and who wasinspired to become an archivist at the age of 20, retired asassociate director of the Hoover Institution and director of the Hoover Library and Archives on September 2.“I had hoped, when I was 20, to retreat from the realworld and into the archival world to study the lives andworks of the hopeless romantics of history,” Danielson toldfriends and coworkers who gathered on August 31 to wishher well. “However,Ifound myself on the cutting edge of history, not once but twice, here at Hoover,” she said refer-ring to the political changes that swept Eastern Europebeginning in 1989 and the current political ferment inTaiwan.On September 2, Danielson’s new title became archivistemerita. She will now begin pursuing her own research,focused on archives theory, building on her nearly threedecades of hands-on experience.Under her direction, the archives at Hoover grew and wereaugmented with collections that include correspondence of the Romanov family,the papers of poet and novelist BorisPasternak, the papers of Soviet literarycritic, dissident, andpolitical prisoner Andrei Siniavskii, materials of Chiang Kai-shek and T.V.Soong in the T.V.Soong collection, and thepapers of German steel industry executive Dieter Spethmannon the process of European unification.She recently was awarded the Society of AmericanArchivists’ 2005 Fellows’ Ernst Posner Award for her article“Privacy Rights and the Rights of Political Victims: Implica-tions of the German Experience” in the most recent volume,number 67, of 
The AmericanArchivist 
.(See above.)She also received many other important awards for out-standing work in her field. In 2004, Danielson was awardedthe National Order of Merit (rank of commander) of Romania for her “important role in the preservation anddevelopment of the extensive Romanian collections of theHoover Archives, for her special support to Romanianresearchers, and for donating copies of I. G. Duca’sandNicolae Titulescu’s archival collections to Romanian culturalinstitutions.”In 2001, she received the Laurel Award of the Polish PrimeMinister for her work with the Polish State Archives. Herresearch has been supported by Woodrow Wilson, Fulbright,and Whiting Fellowships. She is a member of Alpha chapterof Phi Beta Kappa.Danielson joined the internationally renowned HooverInstitution Archives in 1978, working in all areas of theorganization: first in technical services, then reference, out-reach, collection development, and then management.After serving as acting archivist for one year, 1996–97, shewas named archivist on September 1, 1997. She was madehead of both the libraryand archives on September 1, 2001,and then associate director of the Hoover Institution on January 1, 2002.Beforeher Hoover appointment, Danielson was an assis-tant professor at Santa Clara University and prior to thatheld a teaching fellowship at Stanford University. Danielsonholds a Ph.D. and an A.M. degree in German studies fromStanford and a master’s degree in library science and anundergraduate degree from the University of California,Berkeley.
E
LENA 
D
 ANIELSON RETIRES AS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND DIRECTOR OF LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES AFTER 
27
 YEARS
S
OCIETY OF
MERICAN
RCHIVISTS PRESENTS
2005F
ELLOWS
’ E
RNST
P
OSNER 
 WARD TO
E
LENA 
D
 ANIELSON
 
3
he Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn,
written by Hoover distinguished visitingfellow Diane Ravitch, was named by the Hoover Institution asthe winner of its 2004 Uncommon Book Award.The award was announced by Hoover Institution director John Raisian on September 8 during a meeting of the KoretTask Force on K–12 Education, of which Ravitch is also amember.In
The Language Police
(Alfred A. Knopf, 2003), Ravitchmaintains that America’s students are compelled to readinsipid texts that have been censored and bowdlerized, issuedby publishers who willingly cut controversial material fromtheir books—a case of the bland leading the bland.
The Language Police
is the first full-scale exposé of this cul-tural and educational scandal written by a leading historian.It documents the existence of an elaborate and well-estab-lished protocol of beneficent censorship, quietly endorsed andimplemented by test makers and textbook publishers, states,and the federal government. Ravitch offers a powerful politi-cal and economic analysis of the causes of censorship. Herpractical and sensible solutions for ending it will improve thequality of books for students as well as liberating publishers,state boards of education, and schools from the grip of pres-suregroups.Information about the book is available at www.language-police.com and at www.randomhouse.com/knopf/catalog/ display.pperl?isbn=9780375414824.Ravitch is a historian of edu-cation and research professor of education at New York Univer-sity. In addition to her distin-guished visiting fellowship andmembership in the Koret TaskForce at Hoover, she is a non-resident senior fellow at theBrookings Institution in Wash-ington, D.C. She was assistantsecretary in charge of researchin the U.S. Department of Edu-cation in the administration of President George H. W. Bush and was appointed to the Na-tional Assessment Governing Board by President Bill Clinton.The author of seven previous books on education, includingthe critically acclaimed
Left Back: A Centuryof Battles overSchool Reform
,she lives in Brooklyn, New York.The W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell Un-common Book Award is presented annually to an author affil-iated with the Hoover Institution whose work is selected by apanel of Hoover fellows. The award is given for a publishedbook or other significant work on a public policy issue that,in the panel’s determination, meets the highest standards of scholarship at the Hoover Institution.The $10,000 honorarium that accompanies the UncommonBook Awardis underwritten by a gift from Hoover Institutionsenior fellow Rita Ricardo-Campbell and the late directoremeritus Glenn Campbell. The award recognizes the work of aHoover fellow, or other person associated with the Institu-tion, whose writing and research reaches the highest standardsof scholarship on public policy issues.
D
IANE
 AVITCH RECEIVES
2004U
NCOMMON
B
OOK 
 WARD FOR 
HE 
L
 ANGUAGE 
OLICE 
Diane Ravitch
T
he Breukelein Institute in New York has named Hooverdistinguished visiting fellow Diane Ravitch a recipient of its 2005 Gaudium Award.The awards are given annually to four men and womenwhose lives have “illumined the horizon of human experi-ence” through their extraordinary vocations in the arts andpublic service. The awards will be presented on November 7in New York City.The word
 gaudium
is Latin for joy, which is what, thefoundation notes, the recipients have shared with the workthey do.Ravitch is a member of the Hoover Institution’s Koret TaskForce and research professor of education at New York Uni-versity. Ravitch also holds the Brown Chair in EducationPolicy at the Brookings Institution. From 1991 to 1993 shewas assistant secretary of education in the administration of President George H.W.Bush. Among the eight books she hasauthored, her most recent titles include
The LanguagePolice: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn
(2003) and
Left Back: A Century of Battles over School Reform
(2000).Other recipients of the award, established in 1982, includeauthor,historian, and jazz musician Dave Brubeck; authorand historian Thomas Cahill; NotreDame University presi-dent Rev. Theodore Hesburgh; producer Joseph Papp;author Walker Percy; and Nobel laureate Isaac BashevisSinger.The Breukelein Institute is a not-for profit, nonreligiousentity established by the members of the Pontifical Congre-gation of St. Philip Neri in Brooklyn, New York, to raisemoney and originate programs and activities to affirm,improve, and reform the quality of life in the city of NewYork, particularly in Kings County.
B
REUKELEIN
I
NSTITUTE HONORS
D
IANE
 AVITCH WITH
G
 AUDIUM
 A 
 WARD

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