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Hoover Institution Newsletter -Winter 2005

Hoover Institution Newsletter -Winter 2005

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Published by Hoover Institution
-Senior Fellow Condoleezza Rice sworn in as U.S. secretary of state
-Hoover Institution joins Woodrow Wilson Center in conference on Cold War broadcasting impact
-Exhibit at Warsaw's Royal Castle celebrates Herbert Hoover's Polish legacy
-Fordham Foundation Prize goes to Senior Fellow Terry Moe
Q&A: David Brady on the new world of election polling
-Senior Fellow Condoleezza Rice sworn in as U.S. secretary of state
-Hoover Institution joins Woodrow Wilson Center in conference on Cold War broadcasting impact
-Exhibit at Warsaw's Royal Castle celebrates Herbert Hoover's Polish legacy
-Fordham Foundation Prize goes to Senior Fellow Terry Moe
Q&A: David Brady on the new world of election polling

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Published by: Hoover Institution on Aug 11, 2011
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International researchers and formergovernment officials met in mid-October at the Hoover Institution toaddress the impact of Western broad-casting—especially Radio Free Europeand Radio Liberty (RFE/RL)—duringthe cold war.The conference was held in conjunc-tion with the exhibit “Voices of Hope:The Storyof Radio Free Europe andRadio Liberty.” In this exhibit theHoover Library and Archives covered,from its beginnings to today, the oftencontroversial effort by the UnitedStates government to reach listenerswith news about their countries andpromote democracy.Organizers were the Hoover Institu-tion at StanfordUniversity and theCold War International History Project(CWIHP) of the Woodrow Wilson In-Condoleezza Rice, the Thomas andBarbara Stephenson Senior Fellow atthe Hoover Institution, was sworn inas U.S. secretary of state on January28.She is on leave from the Hoover In-stitution. In December 2000, she wasappointed by President George W.Bush to be assistant to the president fornational security affairs.Rice served as a Hoover seniorfellow from 1991 until 1993, when shewas appointed provost of StanfordUniversity.She held the position of provost for six years, during whichtime she served as the chief academicand budget officer of the university,before stepping down on July 1, 1999.Rice first came to Stanford in 1981as a fellow in the arms control and dis-armament program. She is a tenuredprofessor in the university’s politicalscience department and was a HooverInstitution national fellow from 1985until 1986.Following her initial Hoover Institu-tion affiliation, Rice went to Washing-ton, D.C., to work on nuclear strategicplanning at the Joint Chiefs of Staff aspart of a Council on Foreign Relationsfellowship. She came back to Stanfordwhen the fellowship ended.Rice returned to Washington in1989 when she was made director of Soviet and East European affairs at theNational Security Council. She alsowas appointed special assistant to thepresident for national security affairsand senior director for Soviet affairs atthe National Security Council underPresident George H. W. Bush. In thoseroles, she helped bring democraticreforms to Poland and played a vitalrole in crafting many of the Bush ad-ministrationspolicies towardtheformer Soviet Union.Rice’s professional activities at Stan-ford have not been limited to the uni-versity. She cofounded the Center for aNew Generation, an after-schoolacademy in East Palo Alto, California,and was a corporate boardmember forChevron, the Hewlett Foundation, andCharles Schwab.
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The Hoover Institution Fall Retreat, October 24–26, 2004,again captured the times with speakers addressing currentpublic policy and events.“We have won the intellectual battle for ideas that affect afree society, but the transition from proposed solutions toactual policy implementation involves the political processthat is Congress. All toooften Congress follows theYogi Berra dictum ‘Whenyou come to a fork in theroad, take it.’”These were part of thewelcoming remarks madeby Kurt Hauser, HooverBoard of Overseers chair-man, at the October 24dinner,which began theHoover Institution’s FallRetreat 2004.Hoover fellows, Hausersaid, address public policyissues by generating ideas toaddress those issues. Theseideas include replacing theSocial Security system withprivate accounts, providingschool vouchers to allowparents and students tochoose the school theyattend, and replacing thecurrent tax code with a flattax.Hoover director JohnRaisian welcomed partici-pants to the 15th year of theretreats. Each year, since theretreats began in 1989,Raisian said, has led togreater participation. Jon Meacham, the speak-er at Sundaysdinner,notedthat “war elections arealways ferocious affairs.” Inhis talk, “Ballots andBullets: The Politics of Warfrom FDR and Churchill toBush and Kerry,” Meacham,a
Newsweek
editor andauthor of 
Franklin and Winston: An Intimate Por-trait of an Epic Friendship
,examined the tactics used byopponents in presidentialcampaigns during wartimeelections.In his remarks at thedinner Monday, October 25,Tucker Carlson, then cohostof CNN’s
Crossfire,
said hefelt the most pressing ques-tion about the campaignwas why Senator John Kerry wasn’t further ahead in thepolls. Carlson cited challenges faced by the George W. Bushpresidency that might dampen support and warned thatBush’s time in office would be defined by Iraq.In the first morningsession on October 25, theWashington correspondentfor the
Economist,
AdrianWooldridge, discussed theconservative movement inthe United States in his pre-sentation “The RightNation: Conservative Powerin America.”“Very few people calledthemselves conservativesfifty years ago,” said Wool-dridge. That number hasrisen to 41 percent today,with just 19 percent identifying themselves as liberals. In hisrecent book
The Right Nation,
which he coauthored with John Micklethwait, they examine the conservative move-ment in the United States.RichardEpstein, the Peter and Kirsten BedfordSeniorFellow at Hoover, andStephen Williams, U.S.Courtof Appeals judge forthe District of ColumbiaCircuit, discussed propertyrights.In “Treachery: HowAmerica’s Friends and FoesAre Secretly Arming OurEnemies,” Bill Gertz, re-porter for the
WashingtonTimes
and an analyst for theFOX News Channel, dis-cussed the proliferation of 
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Kurt HauserJon MeachamJohn RaisianTucker CarlsonIrshad ManjiRichard Perle
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The lifelong interest in and assistance to Poland by HerbertHoover, the founder of the Hoover Institution and the UnitedStates’ 31st president, was commemorated with the openingof a special exhibit, “American Friendship: Herbert Hooverand Poland” on November 12 in Warsaw.Cosponsored by the Hoover Institution and the RoyalCastle in Warsaw, the exhibit was opened in the Library of King Stanislaw August Poniatowski, housed in the seven-teenth-eighteenth century Tin-Roofed Palace wing of theRoyal Castle complex. The exhibition, with a bilingual storyline and a printed guide, was at the Royal Castle until January 16.During 2005, it will be exhibited in Lodz, February 15 toMarch 13; Poznan, May 1 to 31; Krakow, July 4 to August28; and Wroclaw,September 2 to October 15.Two important anniversaries in 2004—the 130th year of HerbertHoover’sbirth and the 40th year of his death—wereabackdrop to the exhibition.The exhibition is chronologically divided into parts and in-cludes photographs and documents, as well as historical arti-facts illustrating Herbert Hoover’s commitment—throughouthis life as a private citizen, statesman, president, and human-itarian—to the survival and well-being of Poland. The exhibititems aremostly from Hoover Institutionholdings, with ad-ditional docu-ments drawn fromthe Polish StateArchives.The afternoonceremonies beganwith the laying of awreath at thememorial stone inHoover Square onKrakowskie Przed-miescie. The open-ing was held in the Great Assembly Hall of the Royal Castlewith the participation of representatives of the Polish gov-ernment, the United States Embassy,as well as Warsaw’sin-tellectual and cultural elite. The celebration included aconcert by Cantores Minores, the internationally renownedmen and boy’s choir of the Basilica Cathedral of St. John theBaptist in Warsaw.The Hoover Institution delegation to Warsaw, which in-cluded some 20 overseers, fellows, staffmembers, andspouses, was led by Director John Raisian and HerbertHoover III.The exhibition and the publication of the catalog weremade possible by a gift from the Taube Family Foundation.Agift from Henrietta Fankhauser enables the exhibition totravel to the various cities in Poland.
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Recent developments regarding Iran’s intent and ability todevelop a nuclear weapons program, covered widely by themedia, highlight the importance of a conference hosted by theHoover Institution on November 11. The conference, “Iran’sNuclear Program: International Implications and U.S. ForeignPolicy Options,” examined Iran’s capabilities and domestic pol-itics and the international political implications of Iran’s be-coming a nuclear power.The question of whether Iran could develop nuclear weaponswas addressed in the first session, “Assessing the IranianNuclear Program: Technical Capabilities and Intent.” Thespeakers, David Albright, president, Institute for Science and In-ternational Security, and Henry Sokolski, executive director,Nonproliferation Policy Education Center, acknowledged thatIran may already be nuclear-ready. In their presentations theydiscussed the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of NuclearWeapons, which allows for the development of nuclear powerby countries for peaceful purposes. Referring to the treaty,Sokolski pointed out that “they have a right to enrich and if they do, they are within weeks of having a bomb.”Hoover senior fellow Sidney Drell, one of the commentatorsat the session, said, “We are dealing with one of the most dan-gerous problems in the world at this point.” Expressing concernabout how to decide which countries get access to materials, herecommended that the problem be approached with consistentstandards. “Yes to Brazil, no to Iran—that’s not the way to doit,” he concluded. Other commentators at the session includedSharam Chubin, director of research, Geneva Centre for Secu-rity Policy, and Najmedin Meshkati, professor of engineering,University of Southern California. The session was chaired byAbbas Milani, research fellow, Hoover Institution.In “Domestic Politics of Iran’s Nuclear Program,” Milanispoke of the mullahs, Iran’s religious leaders, as being cleverstrategists. He believes that they are most afraid of interventionby the United States, as it is the only countrythat hasn’t “cut adeal” with them. “They want North Korean treatment,” Milanisaid, “not Saddam Hussein treatment.” He criticized theIranian opposition for not articulating a position, the Euro-peans for not paying due attention to human rights breaches,and the United States for not having a policy on Iran.
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continued on page 11
Hoover director John Raisian (center) joinsWarsaw mayor Lech Kaczynski (right) and themayor's wife during the exhibit opening.

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