Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Hoover Institution Newsletter - Spring 2004

Hoover Institution Newsletter - Spring 2004

Ratings: (0)|Views: 67|Likes:
Published by Hoover Institution
-Federal officials, journalists, Hoover fellows discuss domestic and world affairs at Board of Overseers meeting
-Hoover SIEPR share $5 million gift in honor of George P. Shultz
-President Bush names Henry S. Rowen to panel on weapons of mass destruction
-Papers of T.V. Soong to be opened
-Niall Ferguson, Victor Davis Hanson, A. Micheal Spence named Senior Fellows
-Federal officials, journalists, Hoover fellows discuss domestic and world affairs at Board of Overseers meeting
-Hoover SIEPR share $5 million gift in honor of George P. Shultz
-President Bush names Henry S. Rowen to panel on weapons of mass destruction
-Papers of T.V. Soong to be opened
-Niall Ferguson, Victor Davis Hanson, A. Micheal Spence named Senior Fellows

More info:

Published by: Hoover Institution on Aug 11, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/06/2014

pdf

text

original

 
T
he Annenberg Foundation hasgranted Stanford University $5million to honor former U.S.secre-tary ofstate George P.Shultz.The Hoover Institution will receive $4million to endow the Walter and LeonoreAnnenberg Fund in honor ofGeorge P.Shultz,which will support the AnnenbergDistinguished Visiting Fellow.The Stanford Institute for EconomicPolicy Research (SIEPR) will receive $1million for the George P.Shultz Disserta-tion Support Fund,which supports empir-ical research by graduate students workingon dissertations oriented toward problemsofeconomic policy.“In all ofhis capacities,George hasgiven unstintingly to this institution over
S
ecretary ofState Colin Powell dis-cussed the importance ofhumanrights,democracy,and the rule oflawwhen he addressed the Hoover InstitutionBoard ofOverseers and guests on Febru-ary 23 in Washington,D.C.Powell told the group ofmore than 200who gathered to hear his postluncheon talkthat worldwide political and economicconditions present not only problems butalso great opportunities to share Americanvalues.Other speakers during the day includedDinesh D’Souza,the Robert and KarenRishwain Research Fellow,who discussedthe future ofAmerican conservativism.Reflecting on the legacy ofRonaldReagans presidency,he pointed to endur-ing values and virtues that have sustainedAmerican society for more than 200 years.
• INSIDE •
P
APERSOF
T.V.S
OONGTOBEOPENED
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2G
EORGE
P.S
HULTZPRESENTSTHIRD
ISSINGER 
ECTUREAT
IBRARYOF
C
ONGRESS
. . . . . 3N
IALL 
F
ERGUSON
,V
ICTOR 
D
AVIS
H
ANSON
,A.M
ICHAEL 
S
PENCENAMEDSENIORFELLOWS
. . . . . . . . . . . 12
H
OOVER 
, SIEPR 
SHARE
$5
MILLION GIFTIN HONOR OF
G
EORGE
P.S
HULTZ 
F
EDERAL OFFICIALS
,
 JOURNALISTS
, H
OOVER FELLOWSDISCUSS DOMESTIC AND WORLD AFFAIRS AT BOARD OF OVERSEERS MEETING
H
oover Institution senior fellowHenry S.Rowen was named by President Bush in Feburary as amember ofthe Commission on Intelli-gence Capabilities ofthe United StatesRegarding Weapons ofMass Destruction.His appointment,along with that of Charles M.Vest,president ofthe Massa-chusetts Institute of Technology since1990,completed thepresidential appoint-ments to the panel.The nine-memberindependent and bipartisan group includescochairs Charles S.Robb and Judge Lau-
P
RESIDENT
B
USH
N
 AMES
H
ENRY 
S. R 
OWENTO
P
 ANEL ON
EAPONS OF
M
 ASS
D
ESTRUCTION
See our web site's new look—now with easier navigation.Visit us for daily news and updates at www.hoover.org
HOOVER INSTITUTION
S P R I N G 2 0 0 4
NEWSLETTERNEWSLETTER
Colin Powell
continued on page 4continued on page 8continued on page 10
ONLINE ONLINE 
HOOVER INSTITUTION
 
2
T
he family ofone ofthe most influen-tial figures in modern Chinesehistory has decided to open fully,forthe first time,its historical papers forresearch in the Hoover InstitutionArchives.T.V.Soong,foreign minister ofChinaduring World War II,worked closely withUnited States president Franklin D.Roo-sevelt to defeat Japan,negotiated withMoscow to reestablish Chinese sovereignty over Manchuria,and represented China atthe founding ofthe United Nations.Hispapers consist ofthree parts.The first part,39 boxes,has been avail-able for research in the Hoover Archivessince its acquisition as a gift from the family in the 1970s.That landmark collection hasbeen used extensively.According to Stan-ford professor ofChinese politics JohnLewis,“For the research on my coauthoredbook
Uncertain Partners
,I was privilegedto draw on the files ofthe Soong-Stalinmeetings from June to August 1945 for ourbest understanding ofStalins postwarplans for Asia.”The second part,19 boxes,was restrictedduring the lifetime ofSoong’s sisterMadame Chiang Kai-shek out ofrespectfor her privacy.But when Madame died onOctober 23,2003,at age 105,the heirsdecided,in the interest offostering a moreaccurate understanding oftheir homeland,to open the closed 19 boxes.There is a general lack ofdocumentationon Chinese history.Jonathan Spence,whoteaches modern Chinese history at Yale,wrote recently in the
New York Times BookReview
(February 29,2004) that this gap inthe archival record has left much history “inthe hands ofChinese composers ofthekind ofunofficial histories that the Chinesecall
 yeshi
(literally wild or undocumentedhistories).”To counter such unofficial histories,,thefamily has since augmented the existingofficial files at Hoover with a third part:more than 2,000 documents from theirprivate family archives.Michael Feng,grandsonofT.V.Soong,hand-carried these newly available materials fromNew York to the HooverInstitution at Stanfordon March 12,2004.In these papers T.V.Soong,as an eyewitness to history,describes such turning points as the abduc-tion ofChiang Kai-shek in 1936 (called theSian incident),the dismissal ofGeneralJoseph Stilwell,and the framing oftheSino-Soviet Treaty of1945.The newly available papers include rarepersonal correspondence among the Soongfamily,including the famed sisters,Madame Chiang Kai-shek,Madame SunYat-sen,and Madame H.H.K’ung.In aneffort to correct pervasive
 yeshi
-stylerumors about the family’s personalfinances,the decision was made to openprivate financial papers as well.Althoughprivate individuals rarely include personalfinancial data in archival donations,T.V.Soong’s heirs chose transparency tocounter unwarranted speculation.All future historians ofChina will minethese marvelous additions to the archivesand in their citations will recall the greatcontributions ofT.V.Soong to the modernhistory ofChina,commented ProfessorLewis.Hoover Institution senior fellowRamon Myers explained that these paperscover the “debates with Winston Churchill,John Davis and many others”and that thefiles “show Soong to be a loyal and brilliantofficial representing his country whileadvancing its national interests and strate-gic thinking.”Once they have been cataloged,thesepreviously unknown documents will bemade available,on April 26,2004,forresearch in the reading room ofthe HooverInstitution Archives,which is open to thepublic free ofcharge.Information can befound on the web site:www.hoover.org/hilaor by contacting the head ofreference,Carol Leadenham at leadenham@hoover.stanford.edu.
P
 APERS OF
T. V. S
OONGTO BE OPENED FOR FIRST TIME
Michael Feng (left),grandson ofT.V.Soong,was joined byElliot Feng (center),great-grandson ofT.V.Soong,and LeoSoong (right),nephew ofT.V.Soong,who screened theclosed collection for the family in preparation for openingthe documents April 26,2004.
T
he Center for Research on EducationOutcomes (CREDO) hosted anEvaluation Boot Camp for theUnited States Department ofEducation toteach a select number ofstaffaboutprogram evaluation February 25–27 inWashington,D.C.The program offered participants an effi-cient way to become better advocates,plan-ners,and consumers ofprogram evalua-tions.The workshop emphasized both skillbuilding and the strategic use ofevaluationevidence in policy decisions.CREDO director Margaret Raymond,aHoover research fellow,noted that theworkshop combined practical knowledgeand big-picture perspectives.CREDO,whose mission is to improveresearch and evaluation practice in the areaofeducational policy,was established at theHoover Institution to improve the body of empirical evidence about education reformand student performance at the primary and secondary levels.For more informationon CREDO,see http://credo.stanford.edu/.
E
 VALUATION
B
OOT
C
 AMP FOR 
D
EPARTMENT OF
E
DUCATION
G
IVEN BY 
C
ENTER FOR 
ESEARCH ON
E
DUCATION
O
UTCOMES
 
3
I
particularly welcome this opportu-nity to speak under the mantle of Henry Kissinger,at the venerableLibrary ofCongress,and in Washington,D.C.Beyond the honor,the reason is my convictionthat we are at one ofthose special moments inhistory:the topic ofthe day is Iraq andweapons not accounted for;but the implica-tions ofactions in Iraq for the world and forour future go far beyond this immediate case.”So began Hoover fellow George P.Shultz ashe delivered the third annual KissingerLecture,titled “A Changed World,on Febru-ary 11 in the Coolidge Auditorium oftheLibrary ofCongress’s Thomas Jefferson Build-ing.Shultz was speaking in his capacity as theKissinger Lecturer.(See http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/kluge-shultz.html for broadcast of speech.)The establishment ofthe Henry AlfredKissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and Interna-tional Relations at the Library ofCongress in1999 created an endowment to provide for aKissinger Scholar and a Kissinger Lecturer.The Kissinger Lecturer,chosen annually by Librarian ofCongress James H.Billington,may be ofany nationality and is an individualwho has achieved distinction in the field of foreign affairs.The inaugural Kissinger Lecture was deliv-ered in October 2001 by Henry Kissingerhimself.The Kissinger Chair establishes an impor-tant focus at the Library ofCongress forresearch and discussion offoreign policy andinternational affairs.Shultz is the Thomas W.and Susan B.FordDistinguished Fellow at the Hoover Institu-tion.He has held four cabinet-level posts:U.S.secretary ofstate,U.S.secretary ofthe Trea-sury,U.S.secretary oflabor,and director of the Office ofManagement and Budget.Healso held the Jack Steele Parker Professorshipin International Economics at Stanford Uni-versity’s Graduate School ofBusiness and waspresident ofBechtel Corporation from 1974to 1982.An adapted version ofthe Kissinger Lecturewas published on March 29 in the
Wall Street  Journal.
G
EORGE
P. S
HULTZ 
P
RESENTS
T
HIRD ANNUAL 
ISSINGER 
ECTURE AT
IBRARY OF
C
ONGRESS
he Big Show in Bololand:The American Relief Expedition to Soviet Russia in the Famine of1921,
written by Hoover researchfellow Bertrand Patenaude,wasnamed by the Hoover Institu-tion the winner ofits 2003Uncommon Book Award.The award was announcedby Hoover Institution directorJohn Raisian on February 23 during theHoover Institutions Board ofOverseersMeeting in Washington,D.C.
The Big Show in Bololand 
is based onmaterials in the Hoover InstitutionArchives and was published in2002 by Stanford University Press.It portrays a crucialAmerican reliefexpedition toSoviet Russia in 1921 to miti-gate the impact ofthe faminethat killed millions.Information about the book is availableon the Hoover Institution web site athttp://www-hoover.stanford.edu/pubaf-fairs/newsletter/02091/bololand.html andat the Stanford University Press web site athttp://www.sup.org/cgi-bin/search/book_desc.cgi?book_id=4467%204493.In November 2003,the book was cowin-ner ofthe prestigious 2003 MarshallShulman Book Prize from the AmericanAssociation for the Advancement ofSlavicStudies (AAASS),in conjunction with theHarriman Institute at Columbia Univer-sity.
T
HE
IG 
HOW IN  
OLOLAND 
INS
H
OOVER 
I
NSTITUTION
S
2003 U
NCOMMON
B
OOK 
 WARD
U.S.
Army general KevinBynes met with HooverInstitution representa-tives and the staffofStanford University’sInstitute for International Studies during avisit to campus on March 12.General Byrnes was briefed by Lt.Col.JeffFargo,a Hoover national fellow for2003–4,and Hoover staffabout the opera-tion ofthe Institution.He met with army officers currently at Stanford and thenvisited the Institute for InternationalStudies,where he presented a seminar onmilitary and international affairs.General Byrnes assumed the duties of commander,United States Army Trainingand Doctrine Command,in 2002 afterserving as the director,Army Staff.On February 23,Hoover hosted aninformational visit by international stu-dents ofthe U.S.Naval StaffCollege.The 36 representatives from 35 coun-tries were selected by their countries tospend six months in the United Statesstudying international affairs,according toHoover national fellow and U.S.Navy com-mander Matthew A.Weingart,who orga-nized the visit.A goal ofthe program is toexpose the participants,during their timein the United States,to important institu-tions in American society and government.While at Hoover they met with Hooversenior fellow Michael McFaul in a round-table discussion ofU.S.foreign policy andtoured the library and archives.The Naval StaffCollege is a graduate-level resident program ofthe Naval WarCollege in Newport,Rhode Island,formidgrade military officers ofvariousinvited nations.
G
ENERAL 
EVIN
B
 YRNES
,
MEMBERS OF
U.S. N
 AVAL 
S
TAFF
C
OLLEGE VISIT
continued on page 10

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd