Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
7Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education by Hannah More with Critical Introduction by Dana Driscoll

Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education by Hannah More with Critical Introduction by Dana Driscoll

Ratings:

4.5

(2)
|Views: 2,543 |Likes:
Published by Dana
Hannah More was a prolific writer in the 18th and 19th century who published major works on a variety of subjects including female education, social and moral tracts, and fictional works of a religious nature. Even when compared with the contemporaries of her day, Hannah More is a conservative thinker and a conformist to the 18th century traditions and mindset, especially relating to the education of women.

The three selections presented here are taken from Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education that was published in The Complete Works of Hannah More Vol. VI from Harper and Brothers (1835). This is an American publication of the work. The original text from which the digitized form was created can be found in the Purdue University library system.

Included are the introduction to the work, Chapter VIII “On female study, and initiation into knowledge.—Error in cultivating of the imagination to the neglect of the judgment.—Books of reasoning recommended”, and Chapter XIV, “The practical use of female knowledge, with a sketch of the female character, and a comparative view of the sexes.” The introduction of the work was provided to help frame the rest of the selections. Chapter VIII was chosen because of its clear discussion of what types of knowledge are best suited to intensive female study and for its consideration of books for female reasoning. Chapter XIV is a widely anthologized chapter that has yet to appear in a digital form. This chapter is key in understanding More’s conservative viewpoint on women’s rights and can be used as an excellent contrast to more liberal works of the age like A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft or On Female Studies by Anna Barbault.
Hannah More was a prolific writer in the 18th and 19th century who published major works on a variety of subjects including female education, social and moral tracts, and fictional works of a religious nature. Even when compared with the contemporaries of her day, Hannah More is a conservative thinker and a conformist to the 18th century traditions and mindset, especially relating to the education of women.

The three selections presented here are taken from Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education that was published in The Complete Works of Hannah More Vol. VI from Harper and Brothers (1835). This is an American publication of the work. The original text from which the digitized form was created can be found in the Purdue University library system.

Included are the introduction to the work, Chapter VIII “On female study, and initiation into knowledge.—Error in cultivating of the imagination to the neglect of the judgment.—Books of reasoning recommended”, and Chapter XIV, “The practical use of female knowledge, with a sketch of the female character, and a comparative view of the sexes.” The introduction of the work was provided to help frame the rest of the selections. Chapter VIII was chosen because of its clear discussion of what types of knowledge are best suited to intensive female study and for its consideration of books for female reasoning. Chapter XIV is a widely anthologized chapter that has yet to appear in a digital form. This chapter is key in understanding More’s conservative viewpoint on women’s rights and can be used as an excellent contrast to more liberal works of the age like A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft or On Female Studies by Anna Barbault.

More info:

Published by: Dana on Sep 27, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/07/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 
STRICTURESONTHE MODERN SYSTEM
 
OFFEMALE EDUCATION ;
 
WITHA VIEW OF THE PRINCIPLES AND CONDUCTPREVALENT AMONGWOMEN OF RANK AND FORTUNE.By Hannah Moore
With a Critical Introduction by Dana Lynn Driscoll Purdue University
 Digitized by Dana Lynn Driscoll, 2005
Special thanks to Patricia Sullivan at Purdue University for her support and assistance on this project.
 
 
Hannah More: A Critical Introduction
By Dana Lynn Driscoll
Brief Biography
Hannah More was a prolific writer in the 18
th
and 19
th
century who published majorworks on a variety of subjects including female education, social and moral tracts, andfictional works of a religious nature. Even when compared with the contemporaries of herday, Hannah More is a conservative thinker and a conformist to the 18
th
century traditionsand mindset, especially relating to the education of women.More was born in Stapleton, a suburb of Bristol, England, in 1745. The daughter of MaryGrace More & Jacob More, More had four sisters who would later help shape her life foryears to come. Influenced by their schoolmaster father, Hannah’s eldest sister Marystarted a female boarding school that Hannah and her sisters ran successfully for morethan three decades. The school opened in Bristol, England in 1758 and offered lessons inreading, writing, arithmetic, French, needlework and later, dancing. Hannah was first apupil and later a teacher at the school, but left after accepting a marriage proposal fromWilliam Turner of Belmount. The two never married, however, and finally Turneragreed on an annuity for Hannah, which allowed her to become a writer, focus on herown education, and participate activelyin political and public discourse.The earlier part of More’s life includesforays into London polite society withsuch figures as Elizabeth Carter,Edmund Burke, Samuel Johnson, andJoshua Reynolds. In 1772 she began toproduce dramas that were staged withhelp of David Garrik. As she grewolder, however, she grew ever moreconservative and took up a new circleof religious friends including WilliamWilberforce and Zachary Macaulay. In1782, further distancing herself fromthe bustling London society, she movedto the country with her sister, Martha,and began working on her writings onfemale education, etiquette, andreligion.Hannah More’s works include plays(
Percy
(1777),
Sacred Dramas
(1782)) and a host of religious writings (
Practical Piety
 (1811),
Christian Morals
(1813)). Her writing also has a political side, such as herconservative
Village Politics
(1793), in which she wrote to rebuttal
 Rights of Man
writtenby Thomas Paine on the French Revolution. Between 1795 and 1797 she also produceda series of short writings,
Cheap Repository Tracts,
with a moral bent for the working
 
poor. She wrote within the anti-slavery movement (including her 1799
Slavery
poem)and supported the British and Foreign Bible Society. In addition, she wrote from aconservative and religious angle on the education and rights of women, which will bediscussed in more detail below.Hannah More was a very successful writer during her day, and according to some critics,one of the most important conservative female figures of the 18
th
century. And many of the people of 18
th
century London agreed—after her death, it was soon discovered thather writings had allowed her to earn almost
£
30,000.
On Women in Education
Although More is known to present day readers as more of a conservative religious writerand philanthropist, she also had works that dealt with the education and training of females during the 18
th
century. The two most influential of these works were
Structureson the Modern System of Female Education with a view of the Principles and Conduct  prevalent among Women of Rank and Fortune
, first published in 1799, followed by
 Hintstowards Forming the Character of a Young Princess
in 1805.
Strictures on the ModernSystem of Female Education
went through a total of 13 editions by 1826 and had soldover 19,000 copies.Even when compared with the contemporaries of her day, Hannah More is a conservativethinker and a conformist to the 18
th
century traditions and mindset. While she was well-respected within her circle of religious friends, the larger opinion of her work, especiallyaround the time of her death, was that her ideas on women’s rights and education wereoutdated and belonged to an earlier day.Recent criticism shows twoconflicting images of More’sbody of work. On one hand,literature scholars view Moreas a quintessential 18
th
 century woman whose worksof fiction and moralitycontributed much to her ageand beyond. However,feminist historians and criticspaint a dismally poor imageof More as a staunchconservative, anti-feminist,and moral imperialist. Onerecent scholar, however, isattempting to coincide thesetwo views. In her 1996 workon More, Patricia Demers demonstrates that Hannah More was a woman that bothunquestioningly accepted the moral and social hierarchy of her day but yet had thelifelong goal of encouraging women of the upper classes to go beyond female norms and

Activity (7)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Wamaitha Githatu liked this
Heidi BruMar liked this
Sarah Plochl liked this
mikaho liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->