Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
6Activity

Table Of Contents

0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Man Made: Men, masculinities and equality in public policy

Man Made: Men, masculinities and equality in public policy

Ratings: (0)|Views: 146 |Likes:
Published by woodstockwoody
Men’s and women’s lives, and the gender relations between them, change over time, across cultures
and within particular societies. In Britain over the past 40 years, for instance, patterns of male – and
especially female – participation in paid work have shifted as the economy has been restructured.
Many men are spending more time with their children, and voicing a desire to be more involved
fathers (although men’s move into the domestic sphere has not matched that of women into paid
work). These shifts undermine any crude notion that there is one universal form of ‘masculinity’
(or ‘femininity’) applicable to all societies at all times.
Men’s and women’s lives, and the gender relations between them, change over time, across cultures
and within particular societies. In Britain over the past 40 years, for instance, patterns of male – and
especially female – participation in paid work have shifted as the economy has been restructured.
Many men are spending more time with their children, and voicing a desire to be more involved
fathers (although men’s move into the domestic sphere has not matched that of women into paid
work). These shifts undermine any crude notion that there is one universal form of ‘masculinity’
(or ‘femininity’) applicable to all societies at all times.

More info:

Published by: woodstockwoody on Aug 17, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/09/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Men, masculinities and equality in public policy
Man Made:
www.comab.org.uk
coalition on
men
&
boys
 
The Coalition on Men and Boys was formally launched on 26 November 2007. Currentmembers are Action for Children, Bradford University’s Research Unit on Men and Masculinities,the Fatherhood Institute, Men’s Advice Line, Men’s Health Forum, Relate, Respect (the nationalassociation for domestic violence perpetrator programmes), and the White Ribbon Campaign.The Coalition aims to put issues of concern to men and boys firmly on the public policy agenda,within the context of moving towards greater gender equality. The Coalition is unique in thatthere is currently no other organisation that addresses these issues across the range of publicpolicy and advises Government and other policymaking and service delivery agencies on them.The Coalition can also, in active collaboration with women’s organisations, provide a nationallead in encouraging support and responsibility amongst men and boys for measures to tacklediscrimination and gender-based violence.The Coalition has received encouragement and support from the Home Office,the Government Equalities Office and the Equality and Human Rights Commission.To contact the Coalition on Men and Boys, email: info@comab.org.ukFor further information about the Coalition, visit our website:
www.comab.org.uk
coalition on
men boys
&
© The Coalition on Men and Boys 2009Research completed October 2008ISBN 978-1-906121-32-7Copies of the full report (price £10) can be ordered from Respect, Downstream Building,1 London Bridge, London SE1 9GB (email: sarah.read@respect.uk.net), or downloadedfrom the Coalition’s website.
The analysis and recommendations in this report are the responsibility of the Coalition on Men and Boys alone and should notbe taken to represent the views of any particular member organisation or the expert advisers. The views expressed do not reflectthose of the UK Government, the Government Equalities Office or the Equality and Human Rights Commission.
 
3
Man Made:
Men, masculinities and equality in public policy
Acknowledgments
Sandy Ruxton wishes to thank all the members of the Coalition on Men and Boys who havecontributed their ideas, comments and materials to the report. Additional comments were receivedon the fatherhood section from Richard Collier and Marianne Hester. On the ‘Men’s Panel’ in Norway,useful insights were provided by Øystein Gullvåg Holter, Jon Nina and Trond Ødegaard Christensen.On the situation in Wales, helpful advice was received from Jonathan Scourfield and AdeleBaumgardt. Informative interviews were also conducted with officials within the GovernmentEqualities Office, Home Office and Department of Health.Particular thanks are due to those who drafted specific sections of the report: Peter Baker (section on‘Health’); John Devine (‘Education’); and Neil Blacklock and Heather Harvey (‘Violence’). The team ofacademic advisors (Malcolm Cowburn, Brid Featherstone, Jeff Hearn and Keith Pringle) also providedan invaluable source of expert comment, analytical rigour and personal support.The Coalition on Men and Boys also thanks the Government Equalities Office and the Equality andHuman Rights Commission for funding the development of this report. The views expressed in thisreport do not reflect the views of the UK Government, the Government Equalities Office or theEquality and Human Rights Commission.
The author
Sandy Ruxton
was the principal author of the report, and also acted as overall co-ordinatorand editor. He is an Honorary Research Fellow with the Research Unit on Men and Masculinitiesat Bradford University; an Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for the Child, the Family andthe Law at Liverpool University; and a trustee of the British Institute of Human Rights. Prior to this,he was Policy and Communications Manager with Oxfam’s UK Poverty Programme. He has workedas a consultant to a range of organisations, including the NSPCC (National Society for the Preventionof Cruelty to Children), Save the Children, EURONET (the European Children’s Network), SeparatedChildren in Europe Programme, Age Concern, IPPR (The Institute for Public Policy Research), UN HighCommission for Refugees and Cirque du Soleil. His main research interests are: men as carers; theneeds of older men; poverty and social exclusion; and children’s rights. Publications include:
Working With Older Men,
Age Concern England (2006);
What about us?: Children’s rights in the European Union 
, Euronet (2006);
Gender Equality and Men: Learning from Practice 
, Oxfam GB (2004);
Men,Masculinities and Poverty in the UK 
, Oxfam GB (2002).
The academic advisers
Malcolm Cowburn
is Principal Lecturer in Criminology at Sheffield Hallam Universityand former Director of the Research Unit on Men and Masculinities, University of Bradford.His main area of interest is men and sexual violence/coercion; and how sex offender identitiesintersect with other male identities. Recent publications include:
Principles, virtues and care: ethical dilemmas in research with male sex offenders 
, Psychology, Crime & Law (in press);
Pornography 
(with Flood M.) and
Working With Perpetrators or Offenders 
, both in Flood M.,Gardiner J. K., Pease B., Pringle K. (eds.)
The International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities 
,(Routledge 2007);
Men Researching Men in Prison: The Challenges For Profeminist Research 
,Howard Journal of Criminal Justice 46 (3), 2007;
Ethics, research and policy,
in Hodgson,S.M., Irving, Z.,
Policy reconsidered: Meanings, politics and practices 
, (Policy Press 2007).

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
banarisali liked this
drwaheedhegazy liked this
windua liked this
windua liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->