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The Iliad by Homer, translated by Stephen Mitchell

The Iliad by Homer, translated by Stephen Mitchell

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Published by Simon and Schuster
TOLSTOY CALLED THE ILIAD A miracle; Goethe said that it always thrust him into a state of astonishment. Homer's story is thrilling, and his Greek is perhaps the most beautiful poetry ever sung or written. But until now, even the best English translations haven't been able to re-create the energy and simplicity, the speed, grace, and pulsing rhythm of the original.

In Stephen Mitchell's Iliad, the epic story resounds again across 2,700 years, as if the lifeblood of its heroes Achilles and Patroclus, Hector and Priam flows in every word. And we are there with them, amid the horror and ecstasy of war, carried along by a poetry that lifts even the most devastating human events into the realm of the beautiful.

Mitchell's Iliad is the first translation based on the work of the preeminent Homeric scholar Martin L. West, whose edition of the original Greek identifies many passages that were added after the Iliad was first written down, to the detriment of the music and the story. Omitting these hundreds of interpolated lines restores a dramatically sharper, leaner text. In addition, Mitchell's illuminating introduction opens the epic still further to our understanding and appreciation.

Now, thanks to Stephen Mitchell's scholarship and the power of his language, the Iliad's ancient story comes to moving, vivid new life.
TOLSTOY CALLED THE ILIAD A miracle; Goethe said that it always thrust him into a state of astonishment. Homer's story is thrilling, and his Greek is perhaps the most beautiful poetry ever sung or written. But until now, even the best English translations haven't been able to re-create the energy and simplicity, the speed, grace, and pulsing rhythm of the original.

In Stephen Mitchell's Iliad, the epic story resounds again across 2,700 years, as if the lifeblood of its heroes Achilles and Patroclus, Hector and Priam flows in every word. And we are there with them, amid the horror and ecstasy of war, carried along by a poetry that lifts even the most devastating human events into the realm of the beautiful.

Mitchell's Iliad is the first translation based on the work of the preeminent Homeric scholar Martin L. West, whose edition of the original Greek identifies many passages that were added after the Iliad was first written down, to the detriment of the music and the story. Omitting these hundreds of interpolated lines restores a dramatically sharper, leaner text. In addition, Mitchell's illuminating introduction opens the epic still further to our understanding and appreciation.

Now, thanks to Stephen Mitchell's scholarship and the power of his language, the Iliad's ancient story comes to moving, vivid new life.

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Published by: Simon and Schuster on Aug 18, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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09/29/2013

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HomerThe Iliad
Translated, with an Introduction and Notes,by Stephen Mitchell
FREE PRESS
New York London Toronto Sydney New Delhi 
 
BOOK 6
105
[6.384]
or one o your brothers’ wives, or Athena’s temple.She went to the tower as soon as she heard the news
390
that our army was overwhelmed. She was in a totalrenzy and rushed of—it seemed as i she was out o her mind—and the nurse went with her, holding the baby.”At these words, Hector ran rom the house, back alongthe route he had taken, through the broad streets o roy.He had crossed the city and come to the Scaean Gates,where soon he would make his way out onto the plain,when breathlessly his wie came running to meet him,Andromache, King Ëétion’s noble daughter(he had ruled the Cilícians in Tebē under the wooded
400
slopes o Mount Placus). Now she ran up to meet him,and behind her a handmaid came who was holding the childin her arms, an inant, cooing and gurgling, Hector’sbeloved son, as beautiul as a star.Tough Hector had named him Scamándrius, everyone called himAstýanax, “Lord o the City,” because his atherseemed to them all the one deender o roy.Hector smiled as he looked at the boy in silence.Andromache came even closer and stood beside himweeping and said to him, taking his hand in hers,
410
“My dearest, this reckless courage o yours will destroy you.Have pity now on your little boy and on me,your unortunate wie, who beore long will be your widow.Soon the Achaeans will kill you, and when you are gone,it will be ar better or me to die and sink downunder the earth, since once you have met your ateI will have no comort—only unending sorrow.I have no one else. My ather and mother are dead.Achilles cut down my ather when he took Tebē,though he didn’t strip of his armor—respect touched his heart
420
and he couldn’t do that—he burned his body with allhis beautiul war gear and heaped a mound over his ashes,and the nymphs o the mountain planted elm trees around it.I had seven brothers, who lived in my ather’s palace,and all o them, on the very same day, went down

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