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Brahmacharya: The Power to Be: A Great Teacher.

Brahmacharya: The Power to Be: A Great Teacher.

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Published by Dylan Niall Haddock
I wrote this article and sent it to be published in Namaskar, a Hong Kong Yoga publication, but am not sure if it was published or not. The experienced described is one of great power in my life, and there is much more to relate than what is here, though this is a good start and it makes me happy to share this here. :)
I wrote this article and sent it to be published in Namaskar, a Hong Kong Yoga publication, but am not sure if it was published or not. The experienced described is one of great power in my life, and there is much more to relate than what is here, though this is a good start and it makes me happy to share this here. :)

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Published by: Dylan Niall Haddock on Aug 19, 2011
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11/09/2012

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Brahmacharya: The Power to Be a Great Teacher
 
 by Dylan Niall Haddock 
 
written between 3:10am and 5:10am March 15th, 2009
 
"Brahmacharya......" she said with obvious reverence in her voice. At first I thought she was talking to
 
me, and then I realized she was speaking with the Thai Buddhist monk inside of the sanctum. I was outfront beside the Shiva statue, and heard her and the monk conversing in Thai about some specialceremony for which they were busy making preparations.Actually the word she used, though etymologically the same word as 'brahmacharya', is pronounced alittle differently in Thai. In Thailand it sounds more like 'bramajarn', and in its written form the Thai yis still there, though silent. The word 'ajarn' is used much the same as the Thai word for guru - 'kroo' -
 
to specify a teacher in any formal teaching role. 'Bramajarn' is used like Supreme Teacher, to showreverence to teachers with great power. Her use of it in speaking with a monk was new to me.Here all the pre-school through university teachers are known as gurus and acharyas, or 'kroo' and'ajarn' in Thai, as are any teachers. So it was more out of habitually hearing Thais refer to me as guruand acharya for my Yoga and Language teaching, than out of a sense of being somehow special as aYoga Guru visiting a temple dedicated to the Supreme Lord of Yoga, Shiva-Shakti, that I had thoughtshe was talking with me at first. Though to be honest, I felt very inspired and like I was exactly where Iwas supposed to be.It was only weeks before that I had been on the same hill, though at the temple at the top, regularlymeditating in the pre-dawn hours with a friend who goes by the name Maitreya. During that time in thestill early morning hours I'd envisioned, among other things, having a center for doing and teachingyoga on the hill. So when I discovered the Shiva-Shakti Temple, I was very enthusiastic, as if my prayers had been heard, and felt compelled to make merit by doing some yoga asanas there beforegoing on to another appointment I had later that evening.The funny thing about the whole situation was how Maitreya and I actually came to be at the Shiva-Shakti Temple that day without having planned it and having nearly missed it, passing by on an
 
unfamiliar road, not once, but twice, without having seen it. It was my idea to go straight from SouthPattaya Road to try to find a new way up the hill. I knew of two ways, one to the north and one to thesouth, but felt there must be another way, a middle way.There was a way and in searching it out we saw a wonderful rainbow in the sky at our first dead-end,when we realized that we’d need a bridge to cross Sukhumwit Highway. That same rainbow was therewhen we found our crossing, and it heralded the beginning of something truly special.We made our way up a road which turned into a sandy road bed, washed out with yet a small streamflowing down through the sand, and trees alongside. We had to, at times, get off and walk alongsideour motorcycles, more designed for taking whole families to school and to market, than for going off-
 
road riding. We even had to lift them up a two foot ledge at one point. Yet it was good fun and beforelong we made our way out to increasingly good roads towards our destination at the top of the hill witha great view overlooking Greater Pattaya, and the Gulf of Thailand beyond.
 
 
 
It was as we got out to the main road that a couple of friends from Rayong I hadn’t seen in about two
 
years called out, “Hey, Dylan”, from their black pick-up truck as they passed by and stopped. It was a joy to see them and have a chat about Yoga and life before they had to rush off, and then Maitreyarealized he’d left his helmet and t-shirt back at that two-foot ledge.
 
 
I was upset that we’d have to go back down to the washed-out road we’d struggled to come up only just before, as I was on a schedule and hadn’t time to lose. So with some indignation I left back down thehill with my friend to find his helmet and shirt. Yet it was a short-lived emotion as when we parked our 
 
 bikes at the start of the bad road, we were met by a family of dogs including very cute puppies.
 
I was still in a hurry though, so I didn’t see Shiva through the trees, until after running down throughthe sand and grass on the road to retrieve the helmet for Maitreya and back up to the bikes. Then I sawa Shiva image sitting ever graceful and poised in meditation, and felt a great surge of joy well up withinme – joy at finding yet another example of the beautiful melding of Buddhism within the framework of the more ancient Hindu Dharma from which the Buddha was educated in his youth, and Buddhismdraws much wisdom, which is very commonplace here in Thailand, though it still surprises me at timesas Buddha images are still much more common than ones of Shiva.
 
‘Brahmacharya,’ she said, calling upon some deep place within me from which the eternal knowingsprings forth. She was talking to me. Yet as many great teachers do, she was talking to me in a moresubtle way, bypassing my egoism, going to the core of my being, where intuition is very clear.
 
 Next came dedication and demonstration of asana for Shiva and his family in the sanctum, along withthe caretakers of the temple and their children. With my asanas, I sang through the Hanuman Chalisa,
 
from beginning to end, relishing verse 39 for its invoking of Shiva as witness. During my ceremony,she blessed me with a fire offering and prayer to Shiva, warming me with the flame and entering mydance with her own. ‘Wow!’ is what I was experiencing at the time and then all through the night and
 
into the next day, when I, schedule destroyed by Shiva, had a great adventure adventure. I slept for anhour, and mostly wrote, so you can read more later if you like.
 
Shiva is known as the Lord of Yoga. He is the divine destroyer of obstacles, and a great teacher for all
 
on the path of Yoga. ‘Om Namaha Shivaya’ was one of my first mantras and remains a dear one still tothis day.In fact Bhramacharya has many meanings and uses, and this meaning of Great Supreme Teacher, on
 
which I propound here, is one that beckons further reckoning in understanding the ancient texts whenone considers the derivation of the word:
 
“The word
brahmacharya
stems literally from two components:1.
 Brahma
 
, the deity representing the creative force (as part of the trinity of Hindu deities of Brahama as creation, Vishnu as preservation and Shiva as destruction). The word
 Brahma
needs to be distinguished from
 Brahman
, the absolute, eternal, never-born god-head.2.
 Acharya
 
composed of 
char 
- "to go" and 'a' - "toward". Together this makes the word'charya', which is often translated as activity, mode of behaviour, a 'virtuous' way of life.
 Acharya
has meant in practice a teacher, spiritual guide, or master So the word
 
brahmacharya
indicates a life lived in conformance with the creative aspects of ultimatereality or 'god'”Quoted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahmacharya

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