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DH-0820

DH-0820

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Published by The Delphos Herald

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Published by: The Delphos Herald on Aug 22, 2011
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08/22/2011

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S
aturday
, a
uguSt
20, 2011
D
ELPHOS
H
ERALD
T
he
50¢ dailyDelphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Back to school info, p3 Wildcats shut out Tigers in finalscrimmage, p6
UpfrontSports
Forecast
Obituaries 2State/Local 3Politics 4Community 5Sports 6-7Classifieds 8TV 9World News 10
Index
Low in mid 60stonight with 40percent chanceof show-ers, storms.Partly cloudySunday with high in low80s and 30 percent chanceof shower, storms.
www.delphosherald.com
Stacy Taff photos
 Bands kick off fair entertainment 
St. John’s High School Marching Band, above, participates in the 34th annualKewpee Showcase of Bands on opening day of the Allen County Fair. Today’s eventsinclude the Allen County Fair Parade at 9:45 a.m. in downtown Lima and Seether, Finger Eleven and Black Stone Cherry in concert at 7 p.m. in the grandstand; Sundaybrings War Wrestling at 3 p.m. in Roschman Park and Big Time Rush with NewHollow in concert at 8 p.m. in the grandstand. Below: Youngsters enjoy the bumpercars at the fair.
Drug summitaims to mobilizearea residents
By MIKE FORDmford@delphosherald.com
From law-enforcementand drug treatment to DAREand “just say no,” the war ondrugs is waged from all sides.However, drug abuse contin-ues to plague the nation.Tri-County communitiesare far from exempt, so onearea leader has issued a callfor a conversation he hopeswill lead to community mobi-lization and change.Michael Schoenhofer isthe executive director of theMental Health and RecoveryServices Board of Allen,Auglaize and Hardin Counties.He has organized an “Opiates,Bath Salts, Prescription Drugsand Community MobilizationSummit” from 8 a.m. to 4p.m. Sept. 8 at the Lima CivicCenter that is free and open tothe public.Operation Street Smartfrom the Franklin CountySheriff’s Office will deliver apresentation concerning drugtrends with a PowerPointand hands-on interaction.Facilitated conversation willtake place in small groups bythose who attend.Schoenhofer plans for theevent to be more than conver-sation and education.“Our first goal is to engagea wide variety of as many dif-ferent people in our commu-nities as we can: from thosein the treatment professionto law enforcement, educa-tors, parents, church leaders— everybody. We want tobring everyone together totalk about what is going onin our communities in termsof the whole drug issue,” hesaid. “Our second goal is toform task forces in each of our counties to look at whatwe can do to change the cul-ture. There have been pocketsof work done on this in thepast but we haven’t cometogether as a collective wholeand say this is so important tous that we’ll invest the timeand effort to think about it.Changing the culture will taketime and it will also take thewhole community. What eachone comes up with will be alittle different but the peopleof Delphos, for example, will
“Once the summitis over, the goal isto have meetingsin each commu-nity for people togo to and beginthinking throughwhat they want todo in their com-munity. ... ”
— Michael Schoenhofer,executive director,Mental Health andRecovery Services Board
See SUMMIT, page 10
Mike Ford photo
 Motor Madness Weekend smokin’
A crowd gathered in front of St. Joseph Catholic Church to watch area muscle car driversburn rubber in the roadway and fill the air with smoke and the smell of balding tires during thefirst evening of Motor Madness Weekend in Fort Jennings. Events continue today with a lawnmower and golf cart run at noon. At the same time, a NASCAR RC race track will open. Lawnmower hot laps and time trials begin at 6:30 p.m., with races an hour later.
3 die in Pittsburghflash flooding;cars submerged
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Three people diedin a flash flood on Friday after heavy rains sub-merged cars in Pittsburgh and authorities saidthey were searching for other possible victims.Numerous vehicles were submerged in thearea around Washington Boulevard, which runsparallel to the Allegheny River in the city’sHighland Park neighborhood, after thunder-storms dropped up to 3 inches of rain in anhour, the National Weather Service reported.Rescue crews used inflatable boats to reachother stranded drivers, some of whom say thatthe waters near the city zoo were 6 feet deep.KDKA-TV reported that the three victimswere found in the same minivan. Emergencyofficials said a fourth person was missing,according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.Some drivers had to swim to safety fromtheir cars. Rhodearland “Bob” Bailey, 79, of Penn Hills, was rescued from the roof of hiscar.“I can swim a little bit and was lookingat a tree branch,” Bailey told the PittsburghTribune-Review. “I heard one woman yellingfor help, but the water was coming down sofast, I couldn’t see. ... I’ve never seen nothinglike this in my life. Lord have mercy.”Tara Howes, 34, of Gibsonia, told the news-paper that “manhole covers started popping upand it looked like the road exploded and thewaters came up really fast. I saw people swim-ming on the sides of the road. It was prettyscary.”The flash floods hit an area that experiencedserious flooding last month. Claudia Gallagher,55, of West Mifflin, was driving north onWashington Boulevard at the height of rainfalland tried to get off the road as the water rose.“We tried to drive up onto the curb, butthe water had other ideas,” she told the Post-Gazette.Her car began to float, and she opened herwindow and climbed onto the roof, getting herfoot caught in the process. Many other driversnearby were sitting atop their cars, too, shesaid.The floodwaters had receded by early eve-ning, leaving behind stranded cars and roadscaked in mud.Earlier Friday, another storm caused poweroutages that left most of the University of Pittsburgh without electricity.Flights at Pittsburgh International Airportwere grounded because of lightning just after 3p.m., said spokeswoman JoAnn Jenny.Two hospitals operated on emergency powerafter rains flooded a substation in the city’sOakland neighborhood.
Burger King Corp. dethrones ‘The King’
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) —The King is dead, but the burgerlives on.Burger King Corp. on Fridaysaid it is retiring “The King” mas-cot, a man with an oversized plas-tic head and creepy smile who inrecent years has been shown in adspeeping into people’s windows andpopping up next to them in bed.The move is an effort bythe struggling fast food chain toboost slumping sales by focusingits marketing on the freshness of its food rather than the funny-factor of its ads. It’s rolling outa new campaign on today sansThe King to tout its fresh ingre-dients and new products like itsCalifornia Whopper, which hasguacamole.The new focus is a departurefor Burger King, which long hastargeted its ads to male teens wholike to chomp its chargrilled burg-ers and gulp its milkshakes. Theeconomic downturn has batteredits core customer — young maleshave been particularly hard hitby unemployment — and BurgerKing is looking to boost decliningsales by appealing to the mothers,families and others that rivals likeMcDonald’s Corp. have success-fully courted.The new focus comes as BurgerKing attempts to regain its edge.While competitors have grown byupdating their offerings, BurgerKing largely stuck to its menu of burgers and fries.McDonald’s, for instance,has worked to portray itself as ahealthier, hip place to eat, offer-ing wireless access in restaurants,updating decor and introducingsmoothies, oatmeal and yogurtparfaits. And Subway has grownquickly by emphasizing fresh,quick and affordable food. BurgerKing also has faced competitionfrom other burger chains, likeSonic, Carl’s Jr. and Five GuysBurgers and Fries.As a result, Burger King, whichwas once in a neck-and-neck com-petition with McDonald’s, hasbeen eaten up by rivals. In 2010,the top three U.S. restaurant chains— McDonald’s, Subway andStarbucks — all reported strongrevenue gains, while fourth-seatBurger King’s revenue fell 2.5percent.In the second quarter, BurgerKing’s net income fell more than13 percent to $42.8 million. Itsrevenue fell 4 percent to $596.2million. During the same quarter,McDonald’s profit rose 15 percentto $1.4 billion and its revenue rise16 percent to $6.9 billion.
Project Recycleset today
Delphos Project Recycleis set for 9 a.m. to noon todayat Delphos Fuel and Washnorth of Double A TrailerSales on East Fifth Street.Newspaper, phone booksand aluminum cans need tobe in separate containers.Allother items are taken to theVan Wert Recycle Center.Cardboard, magazinesand plastic shopping bagsalso need to be separated. Alltin, plastic and glass contain-ers need to be rinsed clean.Labels can be left on itemsand they can be co-mingled.No window or plateglass, nor light bulbs, orna-mental, Pyrex or cookwareglass will be accepted.Computers, etc., arealso accepted but nomonitors or TVs.
Landeck schoolsets open house
During the 2011 CanalDays celebration, a PurseBingo will be offeredfrom 3-5 p.m. on Sept.17 in the social tent.Tickets are $20 andeach participant will get 20chances to win 20 designerpurses during the two-hourbingo. The last game willbe a coverall for the best of the best designer purses.Tickets can be pur-chased at the DelphosArea Chamber of Commerce office.
Ardner Open still open
The 10th annual JohnArdner Memorial Golf Open set for Sept. 4 at TheOaks Golf Course on SouthKemp Road is still accept-ing teams and individuals.The noon shotgun startincludes 18 holes w/ cartand a BBQ chicken din-ner. Cost is $45 per per-son; proceeds benefit theDelphos Stadium Club.Deadline to sign up witheither Karen (Ardner) Murray(419-303-9615) or BenNeumeier (419-905-8731) isFriday. Deadline to order ashirt from Lion Clothing forthe occasion is Wednesday.
Big Green soccerstart altered
The start time for today’sOttoville at Sidney Lehmanboys soccer opener has beenchanged to 1 p.m. There willbe a varsity match only.Landeck ElementarySchool will hold anopen house from 7-8p.m. Wednesday.All Landeck studentsand parents are invitedto come meet the teach-ers and see classrooms forthe 2011-12 school year.
Canal Days offersPurse Bingo
 
 
Keith’s Landeck Tavern announces...
HOT AUGUST NIGHTS!
THURSDAYS IN AUGUST COOL DRINKS & LIVE MUSIC UNDER THE STARS 
14620 Landeck Rd. • 419-692-0833
KEITH & RANA YONKER
Aug. 25
DAVE KILL BAND
 
8 PM TO MIDNIGHT
Variousdrink specialsonly availableoutside onthe patio!
WHY PAY MORE?
RED BOX 
 ATCHIEF &
McDonald’s
FREETAXSCHOOL
Earn extra incomeafter taking course.Flexible schedules,convenient locations.
Register now!Courses startSept. 15
Liberty Tax Service
Small fee for books.
Call
419-229-1040
2 The Herald Saturday, August 10, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
B
IRTH
L
OTTERY
T
ODAYIN HISTORY
The DelphosHerald
Vol. 142 No. 58
Nancy Spencer, editorRay Geary, general managerDelphos Herald, Inc.Don Hemple, advertisingmanagerTiffany Brantley,
circulation managerThe Daily Herald (USPS 15258000) is published daily exceptSundays and Holidays.By carrier in Delphos andarea towns, or by rural motorroute where available $2.09 perweek. By mail in Allen, VanWert, or Putnam County, $105per year. Outside these counties$119 per year.Entered in the post officein Delphos, Ohio 45833 asPeriodicals, postage paid atDelphos, Ohio.No mail subscriptions will beaccepted in towns or villageswhere The Daily Herald papercarriers or motor routes providedaily home delivery for $2.09per week.405 North Main St.TELEPHONE 695-0015Office Hours8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.POSTMASTER:Send address changesto THE DAILY HERALD,405 N. Main St.Delphos, Ohio 45833
Ottoville Local SchoolWeek of Aug. 23-26Tuesday:
Pizza, chips,corn, pineapple, milk.
Wednesday:
Hamburger,french fries, peas, pudding,milk.
Thursday:
Chicken nug-gets, tossed salad, butterbread, applesauce, milk.
Friday:
Corn dog, chips,green beans, peaches, milk.
Fort JenningsLocal Schools
Chocolate, white or straw-berry milk served with allmeals.H.S. ala carte - Pretzeland cheese available everyFriday.Salad bar with fruit andmilk $2.00 available everyWednesday.
Week of Aug. 22-26Tuesday:
Pepperoni pizza,corn, G-force bar, fruit.
Wednesday:
Corn dog,baked beans, cake, fruit.
Thursday:
Spicy chickensandwich, cheese slice, greenbeans, fruit.
Friday:
Sloppy Jo sand-wich, mixed vegetables, sher-bet, fruit.
Van Wert Cinemas
www.vanwertcinemas.com419-238-2100
8/19 - 8/25
All shows before 6 pm $4.50Adults $7.00 • Kids & Seniors $4.50Book your parties and company outingswith us! Call Ronnie at 419-203-7931
VAN-DEL DRIVE-IN
Fri.Aug 19 - Sat.Aug 20 - Sun.Aug 21
SCREEN 1: Spy Kids-PGSmurfs-PGSCREEN 2:Conan the Barbarian-RPlanet of the Apes-PG13SCREEN 3:Fright Night-RFinal Destination 5-R
Adults: $7.00 Kids 5-11: $4.00
Under 5: Free - Gates Open 8pm - Showtime at Dark
Coming Soon:
 
Contagion-Warrior-Dolphin Tale-Killer Elite
Although the calender may not reflect it,summer is almost over. How do I know this?Well, for one, the cicada are going crazy.According to my esteemed colleague, theearlier you hear them, the earlier the frost is.Fall may be sooner than we think; I’ve beenhearing them buzz for weeks.I know we’ve had some pretty steamyweather in the last months and it couldn’tseem less like school is going to start in twoweeks. It doesn’t seem possible. After we cel-ebrate the Fourth of July, the rest of the sum-mer seems to evaporate. I couldn’t believe itwhen I got the first school registration.Many of my flowers are starting to showthe wear and tear of blooming like crazy forweeks. The impatiens are looking creepy withtheir spindly pale stalks and sparse leaves andmy pale lavender petunias and red and whitebegonias have flowered their brains out andstill look good. That’s quite unusual for me; Idon’t have a black thumb but it’s not a brightgreen one, either.We passed on the tomatoes this year. Lastyear, the potted tomatoes got that funk thatcomes from water splashing up from the dirtand the ones in the back had a case of theblight.We tried to grow tomato plants in thoseTopsy Turvy things and failed miserably bothtimes. The first time, we got one from a friendand pushed our little tomato plant throughthe bottom and filled it with dirt and then myhusband watered it diligently every day. Wefound out you really aren’t supposed to fill itup with dirt or water them that much and itquickly drowned and looked like a weed thathad been set on fire.The second time around, we got one alreadywell established. It was ginormous. It alreadyhad three tomatoes on it. We thought we hadIt made. We were going to show that TopsyTurvy a thing or two. It only took us fourweeks to kill that one. We did get a coupletomatoes off of it before its demise. I’m notsure what happened to it. I know at one pointmy husband thought I was watering it and Ithought he was.So this year, we didn’t even try. Might be acop-out but I am really not concerning myself with it.We also put in some new perennials. I’mtrying to work it so everything just comes upon its own and we don’t have to worry aboutbuying plants. It’s a good theory. I’ll let youknow how it works.Football practice has been underway. Myneighbor girl is on the Jefferson junior highteam. She’s soft-spoken and cute and isn’tafraid to hit or take one. It cracks me up to talkto her with her little-girl voice and know shecould probably take me down and make mesay uncle in a second.Another sure sign of the end of the sum-mer is Allen and Van Wert county fairs. Allenstarted Friday and Van Wert is right aroundthe corner.So now is the time. Carpe diem! Take thatweekend trip, get in that last swim. Summer’salmost over and times a-wastin’. You need toget in the last hurrah of summer.
New Mexico hero whosaved girl says he’s illegal
3 convicted in Cub Scout slayings free
JONESBORO, Ark. (AP)— Three men convicted inthe nightmarish slayings of three Cub Scouts went freeFriday, nearly two decadesafter they were sent to prisonin a case so gruesome it raisedsuspicions the children hadbeen sacrificed in a Satanicritual.Doubts about the evidenceagainst the trio had persistedfor years and threatened toforce prosecutors to put on asecond trial in 2012.Instead, the so-called WestMemphis Three were permit-ted to plead guilty to murderin exchange for time served,ending a long-running legalbattle that had raised ques-tions about DNA and keywitnesses — and attractedsupport from celebrities suchas Eddie Vedder.The men entered thepleas under a legal provisionthat allowed them to main-tain their innocence whileacknowledging that prosecu-tors had enough evidence toconvict them.“Although I am inno-cent, this plea is in my bestinterest,” Jessie Misskelleysaid.Damien Echols had beenon Arkansas’ death row andin 1994 came within threeweeks of execution. Heremained defiant Friday,accusing prosecutors of usinginnuendo and faulty evidenceto convict them.In the event of a new trial,“they knew there would bemore people watching, moreattention on the case, so theywouldn’t be able to pull thesame tricks,” Echols said.Prosecutor Scott Ellingtonsaid it would be “practicallyimpossible” to put on a prop-er trial after 18 years. Themother of a witness who testi-fied about Echols’ confessionhas publicly questioned herdaughter’s truthfulness. Anda crime lab employee whocollected fiber evidence attwo of the defendants’ homeshas died.“I believe this case isclosed, and there are noother individuals involved,”Ellington said.Since the original jury con-victions, two of the victims’families have joined forceswith the defense, declaringthat the men are innocent, headded.The victims’ families werenotified about the pact aheadof time but were not asked toapprove it.Echols said he and the oth-ers would keep working toclear their names. The men,who were teenagers whenthey were convicted, havespent half their lives in pris-on.Asked by reporters abouthis plans, Jason Baldwinreplied, “Live my life thebest I can and enjoy everymoment of it.”Baldwin told reporters hehad been reluctant to pleadguilty to crimes he didn’tcommit, but he agreed todo so to ensure Echols wasspared from death row.Echols thanked Baldwinand called his release “over-whelming.”“It’s not perfect by anymeans,” he said of thearrangement. “But it at leastbrings closure to some areasand some aspects.”The prosecutor said henever considered any pleabargain that would throw outthe verdicts of two juries.“Today’s proceedingallows the defendants thefreedom of speech to saythey are innocent, but thefact is, they just pled guilty,”Ellington said.By entering guilty pleas,the three have lost any rightto file a lawsuit against thestate.ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.(AP) — The man who chaseddown a suspected child abduc-tor and saved a 6-year-old girlfrom what could have beena horrible fate was honoredas a hero Friday. But he isalso gaining a new kind of celebrity: as a poster child of sorts for immigration rightsin state and national immigra-tion debates.Antonio Diaz Chacon, 23,is married to an Americanand has been in the countryfor four years. But Chaconsays he abandoned attemptsto get legal residency becausethe process was difficult andexpensive.Diaz Chacon revealedhis immigration status toUnivision this week and con-firmed to The AssociatedPress that he is illegal, prompt-ing chatter on the Internet andsocial networking sites thathis case underscored immi-grant rights positions in twoongoing political debates.Some argue he is an exam-ple of the kind of immigrantthe federal government willnow largely leave alone. TheDepartment of HomelandSecurity announced Thursdaythat deportations would focuson criminals.“As exceptional as hisstory is,” said ChristinaParker, a spokeswoman forBorder Network for HumanRights in El Paso, Texas, “itpoints to the fact that mostundocumented immigrantsliving in the United Statesare not criminals. He’s morethan not a criminal now. He’sa hero.”Diaz Chacon’s status didn’tplay a role in Albuquerque’sdecision to honor his bravery.Mayor Richard Berry declaredFriday Antonio Diaz ChaconDay in Albuquerque and heldan afternoon ceremony wherehe presented Diaz Chacon aSpanish language plaque rec-ognizing his bravery in jump-ing in his pickup and chasingthe suspect until he crashedinto a light pole. Diaz Chaconthen rescued the girl as thedriver of the disabled van raninto the desert. The suspectwas arrested later by police.Diaz Chacon, with hiswife and two daughters, wasall smiles at the ceremony,which was also attended bythe officers who eventuallyarrested accused kidnapperPhillip Garcia, 29.“He says he is really happyand content and there’s nolarger words for it,” his wifeMartha, who was translat-ing from Spanish for him,said. “It is a real large hap-piness.”Asked in a telephone inter-view with the AP Thursdaywhat would be the best rewardfor his actions, he said he hadalready gotten it: a thank youletter from the little girl.
A summer fling; there’s still time
NANCY SPENCER
On theOther hand
A boy, Colin Andrew, wasborn Aug. 19 at St. Rita’sMedical Center to Chris andSherri Hunt of Delphos.He weighed 9 pounds, 7ounces and was 20 incheslong.He was welcomed home bya brother, Ethan.Grandparents are SandyHellman of Delphos, the lateKenny Hellman and Dave andVicki Hunt of Defiance.CLEVELAND (AP) —These Ohio lotteries weredrawn Friday:
Mega Millions
05-15-53-54-56, MegaBall: 22
Megaplier
2
Pick 3 Evening
3-9-1
Pick 3 Midday
4-3-8
Pick 4 Evening
7-4-7-8
Pick 4 Midday
4-2-6-7
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $37million
Rolling Cash 5
14-16-30-31-33Estimated jackpot:$100,000
Ten OH Evening
03-05-06-07-10-16-19-26-42-44-50-55-56-58-59-61-62-65-67-68
Ten OH Midday
03-05-14-20-23-24-29-34-36-38-42-44-48-55-56-57-58-61-68-75
Ohio to require reviewof all executions
By JoANNE VIVIANOThe Associated Press
COLUMBUS — The Ohioprisons department announcedFriday it would require post-execution reviews of all lethalinjections and a physical eval-uation of the condemned per-son’s veins three weeks priorto execution as part of policychanges made in response toa federal court judge’s criti-cism.Department spokes-man Carlo LoParo said thenew procedures are part of a “comprehensive rewriting”of state execution policy thatwas filed with U.S. DistrictCourt Judge Gregory Frost.Frost halted a July execu-tion, citing “haphazard appli-cation” of certain death pen-alty protocols and calling thesituation an embarrassment.The new policy requirestwo separate reviews. The firstcalls for the execution teamto immediately assess eachexecution to discuss unusualevents, possible improve-ments and any discrepanciesin how their actions havebeen officially documented.The second calls for a “qual-ity assurance review” andrecommendations by a spe-cial assistant designated bythe director of the prisonsdepartment. It must includean evaluation of the execu-tion team and a review of documentation, training andprofessional qualifications.The policy says the newprocedures are to be “strictlyfollowed” and the wardenor prisons director must benotified of any reasons fordeviation, with any varia-tions requiring the director’sapproval.The policy also requiresteam members to do anevaluation of the condemnedinmate’s veins three weeksbefore the scheduled execu-tion, instead of 24 hours, soteam members can preparefor any possible contingen-cies.On July 8, Frost delayedthe execution of death rowinmate Kenneth Wayne Smith,which had been scheduled forJuly 19. He did not judgewhether Ohio’s death penaltyitself was constitutional.Assistant Federal PublicDefender Carol Wright, whorepresents Smith, said Fridaythat his defense team had onlyrecently received the newpolicy and had no immediatecomment.The ruling led Gov. JohnKasich to postpone an Augustexecution to give the statetime to address Frost’s con-cerns. The new policy is togo into effect Sept. 18, twodays before the state’s nextscheduled execution.
Weatherization jobs to be cut as funding ends
COLUMBUS (AP) —Hundreds of home-weath-erization jobs are expect-ed to be lost in Ohio asfederal stimulus moneyruns out for programsthat help low-income andelderly Ohioans with homeimprovements.The Ohio Association of Community Action Agenciestold the state this week thatagencies providing servicesfor the Home WeatherizationAssistance Program expect tolay off about 700 employeesin the next six months.The expected layoffsinclude crew workers andcontractors working forweatherization providersaround the state, Philip Cole,executive director of theColumbus-based associationsaid Friday. The jobs areexpected to disappear as the$267 million in federal stim-ulus money that Ohio beganreceiving in June 2009 runsout, Cole said.The money Ohio receivedwas part of $5 billion allot-ted for weatherization underthe American Recovery andReinvestment Act.More than 32,000 units —including homes and apart-ments — have been weather-ized statewide since the fed-eral money became available,Cole said.More than 1,000 workersacross the state have beentrained for weatherization-related tasks, Dave Rinebolt,executive director and coun-sel for the Ohio Partners forAffordable Energy, told theDayton Daily News.The program was aimedat reducing utility costs by anaverage of 30 percent, savingmoney for residents and tax-payers who pay for heatingsubsidies for the poor, TheColumbus Dispatch reported.
By The Associated Press
Today is Saturday, Aug. 20,the 232nd day of 2011. Thereare 133 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlights inHistory:
On Aug. 20, 1911, The NewYork Times sent a messagearound the world by regularcommercial cable to see howlong it would take; the dispatch,which said simply, “Times, NewYork: This message sent aroundworld. Times,” was filed at 7p.m. and returned to its point of origin 16 1/2 minutes later.
On this date:
In 1833, Benjamin Harrison,23rd president of the UnitedStates, was born in North Bend,Ohio.In 1866, President AndrewJohnson formally declared theCivil War over, months afterfighting had stopped.In 1882, Tchaikovsky’s“1812 Overture” had itspremiere in Moscow.In 1910, a series of forest firesswept through parts of Idaho,Montana and Washington,killing at least 85 people andburning some 3 million acres.In 1920, pioneeringAmerican radio station 8MK inDetroit (later WWJ) began dailybroadcasting.
 
Fort Jennings Schools
Saturday, August 20, 2011 The Herald –3www.delphosherald.com
lincolnview SchoolsSt. John’s SchoolsSpencerville SchoolsELida Schoolsottoville SchoolsDELPHOS CITY SCHOOLS
Franklin ElementaryPrincipal:
Mark Fuerst
First bell:
8:05 a.m.
Last bell:
2:55 p.m.
Jennings ElementaryPrincipal:
Kathy Verhoff 
First bell:
8:40 a.m.
Last bell:
3 p.m.
Linvolnview ElementaryPrincipal:
William Kelley
First bell:
8:19 a.m.
Last bell:
3:06 p.m.
Spencerville ElementaryPrincipal:
Dennis Fuge
First bell:
8:46 a.m.
Last bell:
3:46 p.m.
Jennings ElementaryPrincipal:
Kathy Verhoff 
First bell:
8:40 a.m.
Last bell:
3 p.m.
Elida Middle SchoolPrincipal:
Dave Morman
First bell:
7:40 a.m.
Last bell:
2:45 p.m.
Spencerville MiddleSchoolPrincipal:
Dennis Fuge
First bell:
7:46 a.m.
Last bell:
2:46 p.m.
Jefferson Middle SchoolPrincipal:
Terry Moreo
First bell:
7:50 a.m.
Last bell:
3 p.m.
Elida High SchoolPrincipal:
Sarah Burden
First bell:
7:40 a.m.
Last bell:
2:40 p.m.
Jefferson High SchoolPrincipal:
John Edinger
First bell:
8:15 a.m.
Last bell:
2:58 p.m.
Landeck ElementaryPrincipal:
Mark Fuerst
First bell:
8 a.m.
Last bell:
2:45 p.m.
Jennings High SchoolPrincipal:
Nick Langhals
First bell:
8:07 a.m.
Last bell:
3:07 p.m.
Lincolnview Sr./Jr HighPrincipal:
Kelly Dye
First bell:
8:15 a.m.
Last bell:
3:08 p.m.
Spencerville High SchoolPrincipal:
Shawn Brown
First bell:
7:46 a.m.
Last bell:
2:46 p.m.
Jennings High SchoolPrincipal:
Nick Langhals
First bell:
8:07 a.m.
Last bell:
3:07 p.m.
CafeteriaBreakfastFranklin/Landeck LunchStudents:
$1.00
Students:
$2.00
Adults:
$1.25
Adults:
$2.50
 CafeteriaBreakfastStudents:
$2.20-2.50
Adults:
$1.25
 LunchStudents:
$1.10
Adults:
$2.80
 CafeteriaBreakfastStudents K-4:
$1.25
5-12:
$1.35
 LunchStudents K-4:
$2.10
5-12:
$2.45
 CafeteriaLunchStudents:
$2.00
Adults:
$2.50
 CafeteriaLunchStudents:
$2.00
Adults:
$2.50
 CafeteriaLunchElementary:
$1.75
Jr/Hs Lunch A
: $1.85
Jr/Hs Lunch B:
$2.30
 CafeteriaLunchStudents:
$2.00
Adults:
$2.50
 Parents can pay asmuch as they want onstudent lunch accountsby sending funds toschool with students orby stopping in at theirchild(ren)’s schooloffice.Parents are remindedto drop off elementaryschool children at thesouth door or in frontof elementary.
First day of school: Aug. 29First day of school: Aug. 23First day of school: Aug. 30First day of school: Aug. 23First day of school: Aug. 29First day of school: Aug. 30First day of school: Aug. 23
St. John’s High SchoolPrincipal:
Don Huysman
First bell:
7:45 a.m.
Last bell:
3:01 p.m.
Elida KindergartenPrincipal:
Bob Kiracofe
First bell:
9:05 a.m.
Last bell:
3:35 p.m.
Elida ElementaryPrincipal:
Bruce Sommers
First bell:
9:05 a.m.
Last bell:
3:45 p.m.
St. John’s ElementaryPrincipal:
Nathan Stant
Asst. Principal:
Jean Weber
First bell:
7:50 a.m.
Last bell:
3:01 p.m.
Superintendent: interim to be namedSuperintendent: Scott MangasSuperintendent: Doug FriesSuperintendent: Joel HatfieldSuperintendent: Nick LanghalsSuperintendent: The Rev. Mel Verhoff Superintendent: Don Diglia
District will implementautomated lunchservice in October. Visit jennings.noacsc.org formore information.District will implementautomated lunchservice in October. Visit jennings.noacsc.org formore information.
Back to School 
New ways to give yourkids a competitive edge
(StatePoint) —All par-ents want to give their kidsa competitive edge in schooland in the real world. Withthis in mind, many parentsincreasingly are turning tonew media technologies tomake sure their children havethe skills to succeed.While some are concernedabout children accessinginappropriate content online,many educators and parentsknow that combining tradi-tional and digital learningskills is crucial in today’swired world.“Digital learning lets stu-dents learn at a pace they’recomfortable with and enablesteachers to gain insight intotheir students’ achieve-ments and problems morequickly and accurately,” saysBethlam Forsa, ExecutiveVice President of ContentDevelopment for HoughtonMifflin Harcourt, a leadingprovider of educational solu-tions and developer of digitallearning tools.
Research made easy
Unlike previous genera-tions, today’s youth has a hostof information at their fin-gertips, allowing them morefreedom to explore interestsand hobbies, as well as tolearn. But with so much infor-mation available, it’s impor-tant children learn to discerncredible information fromquestionable content.With this in mind, consid-er exposing children to age-appropriate websites fromaccredited institutions. Forexample, the Smithsonian ismaking educational researcheasier through online resourc-es like smithsonianeducation.org.
Adapting classroomlearning
Digital learning can alsomake the classroom more funand help supplement whatkids read in books and hearfrom teachers. For instance,Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’snew iPad app “HMH Fuse”combines online help within-class learning. Studentscan receive feedback on prac-tice questions, write and savenotes, receive guided instruc-tion, access video lessons andmore.The app provides a year-long Algebra 1 course withclassroom materials andresources. Its comprehensiontracking tools let teachersreceive real-time feedback oneach student. To learn more,visit hmheducation.com/fuse.
Gaming can be good
Since the late 1970s, edu-cators have sought to com-bine gaming with learningand today’s new technolo-gies are making this easi-er. Ironically, some of thegames many parents onceenjoyed, like “Where in theWorld is Carmen Sandiego”and “Oregon Trail,” arealso favorites with today’sstudents. These games letchildren improve math andcritical thinking skills whilelearning about the world. Youcan learn more at thelearning-company.com.
Tips for packing your kids healthful school lunches
(StatePoint) — The rush of getting the kids out the door inthe morning can make pack-ing a healthful lunch seem likean impossible burden.The typical parent will packaround 200 school lunchesyearly and planning them allrequires some serious nutrition-al skills. Not only do parentsneed to know how to choosehealthful fare, but they need toknow how to pick foods theirkids will actually eat.
• Get creative with protein.
Nuts and beans provide morefiber and less saturated fat thantraditional proteins, like meat,cheese and eggs. Try makinga bean dip from chickpeasor pinto beans and pairing itwith crunchy vegetables, likecarrots, celery, bell peppers,or whole-wheat pita triangles.Or add texture and sweetnessto low-fat yogurt with a hand-ful of nuts or granola.
• Pack edible ABCs. Fresh
fruits and nuts are a fun wayfor kids to get much-neededvitamins, from A to zinc. Forexample, oranges pack a wal-lop of vitamin C, blueberriesare full of antioxidants andalmonds are rich in vitaminE, calcium, magnesium andiron.
• Portion control mat
-ters. Little bellies requiresmaller portions. While kidslove opening crinkly bags of chips, the serving size maybe too large and unhealthful.Instead, look for small portionpacks, like .75-ounce bags of healthful nut blends, such asSahale Snacks Cashews withPomegranate or Almonds withCranberries. Choose pack-aged foods made with naturalsweeteners and flavors, likevanilla, honey and sea salt,instead of artificial flavors orhigh fructose corn syrup.
• Drinks are as important
as foods. Once you’ve goneto all that trouble to choosenutritious foods, don’t ruinyour efforts by tossing sodainto your child’s lunchbox.Opt for unflavored low-fatmilk, water or 100 percentfruit juice. Many juice prod-ucts only have small amountsof real fruit juice, so readlabels carefully.
• Make veggies special.
Add extra flavor and crunch tosalads with apple slices, nutsand dried cranberries. Or mixin pre-packaged nut blends orseasoned nuts. For young chil-dren, consider blends combin-ing tree nuts with dried fruit,like pomegranate. Older kidsmight like salads topped withmore flavorful choices, suchas Sahale Snacks BarbecuedAlmonds with Mild Chipotleand Ranch.

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