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Kisari Mohan Ganguli - Mahabharata - Book 5 - Udyoga Parva

Kisari Mohan Ganguli - Mahabharata - Book 5 - Udyoga Parva

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Published by hairao
The Mahabharata is one of the two epics of India, the other being The Ramayana. This book was sourced from www.sacred-texts.com, in a text form which I thought was too cumbersome to read.
Hence I have reformatted and pdfed the same. This should make reading easier.
Whatever I have done is for my pleasure, the real thanks should go to sacredtexts for their commendable efforts.
The Mahabharata is one of the two epics of India, the other being The Ramayana. This book was sourced from www.sacred-texts.com, in a text form which I thought was too cumbersome to read.
Hence I have reformatted and pdfed the same. This should make reading easier.
Whatever I have done is for my pleasure, the real thanks should go to sacredtexts for their commendable efforts.

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Published by: hairao on Aug 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/08/2012

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OFKRISHNA-DWAIPAYANA VYASA 
BOOK 5 – UDYOGA PARVA 
[1883-1896]
 
MAHABHARATA BOOK 5 - UDYOGA PARVA KISARI MOHAN GANGULI
THE
MAHABHARATA 
 
o
KRISHNA-DWAIPAYANA  VYASA 
Translated into English Prose from the OriginalSanskrit Text by 
Kisari Mohan Ganguli
[1883-1896]
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MAHABHARATA BOOK 5 - UDYOGA PARVA KISARI MOHAN GANGULI
Translator's Preface
The object of a translator should ever be to hold the mirror up tohis author.That being so, his chief duty is to represent so far as practicablethe manner in which his author’s ideas have been expressed,retaining if possible at the sacrifice of idiom and taste all thepeculiarities of his author’s imagery and of language as well. Inregard to translations from the Sanskrit, nothing is easier than todish up Hindu ideas, so as to make them agreeable to Englishtaste. But the endeavour of the present translator has been to givein the following pages as literal a rendering as possible of thegreat work of Vyasa.To the purely English reader there is much in the following pagesthat will strike as ridiculous. Those unacquainted with any language but their own are generally very exclusive in matters of taste. Having no knowledge of models other than what they meet with in their own tongue, the standard they have formed of purity and taste in composition must necessarily be a narrow one. Thetranslator, however, would ill-discharge his duty, if for the sake of avoiding ridicule, he sacrificed fidelity to the original. He mustrepresent his author as he is, not as he should be to please thenarrow taste of those entirely unacquainted with him. Mr.Pickford, in the preface to his English translation of the MahaviraCharita, ably defends a close adherence to the original even at the
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