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How the Russian is Different 2

How the Russian is Different 2

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Published by Jamie Wilson

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Published by: Jamie Wilson on Aug 25, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/25/2012

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-
----------------
--
C
J_IHe~t
pOiKJlCIIIIII!
llappy Hinhday'
of
thecelebrant:Yougive your ownparty
no
surprises-and
it
will
be
adinner party
includingchampagne
waMmiucKoe
when
possible.The birthday·'
cake"
will be adessert pie
1111p6r
ortorte
TOpT
,often withbirthdaywishes orthe honored
one's
nameon
it.
Candles
CllC'IKII
aresometimesused,but they seem notsoobligatoryasareours. Birthday cards are mailed if attendance is notpossible, but they are not integral
to
the eventitself. Guests
do
bringgifts
noAapKH,
however,from flowers and drink, on
up.
Within the family, birthdays are celebratedeach year
-so
mehow-as
areallchildren'sbirthdays. A more lavish celebration (withcompany,that is) ismore likely for adultson particular birthdays, especially multiples
of
tenand the fifty-fifthand sixtiethbirthdays,which might correspond
to
retirement
yx6n
Ha
llCHCIIIO.
Theseanniversarybirthda
ys
t0611
J
H~Ittu,te
AaTLI
are especiallyimportant for the bosses
at
work,where there will besome sort
of
cak
e,
acommunal giftnoAapoK, flowers,everybody's
signature
on a congratulatoryletter uoJIJ,paoJiTeJlLHbtli
a11,pec,
andfinally,a congratulatoryspeech from a co-worker.
The Graduation
BLmycKHOH
oe'-lepUponexitfrom school the members
of
thegraduatingclass
llblllYCKHitKii
andtheir parentsattendaprogram
at
schoolwhere thegraduatesare giventheir diplomas opy•tatOT aTTecTaTLI
Jpenocnt.
Particularemphasis
is
placedonthose whodid especiallywell: those whoreceived all A
's
are awardeda gold medal,and those withall A'sbut two geta silvermedal (providing,
of
course,that theirconductwas exemplary).Afterwards,
the
parents go home,andtheyoung onesremain
for
aparty (foodanddance) that hasbeenset
up
for thembytheir parents and teachers. Thereafter,
in
th
eweehours of the night they u
se
d
to
roam
th
estreets
(of
the largecities)singing, but now roaming the streets
is
not recommended.(This isa senti mental time: thestudentshavegonethrough mostoftheirschoollivestogether,and
th
ebonds arcstrong.)Aschoolreunion oe'-lep ocTpe•ut
BLIII)'CKH11KOil
is
apopulareventthatoften includesadance; all former pupilsareinvited, sometimesover the radio. University reunionsareoften held on Tatiana'sday on
25
January.(She is the matronsaint ofstudents.)
The Housewarming
Hooocem,e
To
celebrate moving into a new apartment,thehousewarming Hoaocenbe
is
again the charge
of
those doing the moving. Guests bring a gift,but
it
need not be house-related.The event
is
treated merely
as
acausefor celebration, ratherthan
as
a particularceremony(like thatobserved
by
the peasantswhenthey moved intoanew log house nJ6a).(Ontheotherhand,if youhavea cat,
it
entersthe hous'e first-
the
firstone
to
enter
th
ehou
se
is
the
first
to
die.)
TRANSLATIONS
a.
Forseveraldecades,people were kept like unthinking cattle.
I
remember how,when
I
wasstillquiteyoung,thefirsttime they turned me intoadomestic animal.
My
timid explanation,
"I
thought.
..
"was turned into"the bossthinks foryou, (youhave to) livelikeeveryone else."
MOCKOilCKIIC
HOilOCTit,
14
cf>eopami
1993
b.
It
bothered manycriticsthat Zamyatinwas
an
artistcompletely devoid
of
any superfluity,stingilymeasuring out his lyrical comments,somehowun-Russian
in
his restraint,and neat,with all
hi
sbuttons buttoned. Mark Slonim.
Th
eWriter
and
HisCreation.
TRANSLATIONS
31
 
Evergreen branchesindicatea recent funeral
prayeron atapeacrosstheforehead.
The
religiousservicediffers from thecivil
in
thattheyusuallyalso sing:
AllllHJJYHR,
118blil
ncanoM,
Be•ma11
miMRTb.
After theceremony,
mourner
sfile past theopen casket whilethose nearestand dearest kiss the deceasedgoodbye.
Then
thebody
is
canied
out, againfeet first.Most people prefer burial norpe6eHne tocremation
KpeMliUltst
becausebeli
ef
in
an after-
Ha
Kmin6111ue
onepeone.
life
is
common, especially amongthe religiousoepyiOtUne.A century ago,thepeasants buried their deadwith vodka, salt, tobacco,
andso
ontomakepostnwrtemlifeeasier.Relativesarrange for a grave
MOfH!la
,atombstone
OllMIITHHK,
Eor
)J,a!l,
lior
H BJR!l.God giveth, and
God
takethaway.
PARTICULARCEREMONIES
29
q;
::j
 
~
I
I
I
!
"I
I
I
I
l
,:
/'I
i
l
r
I,
J
,,,
~
::
·•I '
I
I
j
i
:1
I
i
'I
:!
seta date
for
the wedding. Formerly,thecou
pk
received coupons
TaiiOHbl
thatallowed
th
em
!0
buy weddingorhousehold items
in
shon
supply
~eqm•viTHbte
Tooapbl atstores notopen to the public JaKpbtTbte MaraJJiHbl.Onecoupongave
the
bride the right
to
a hairdo npll'tecKaonherweddingday without waiting
in
line.The wedding itself 6paKoco•teTanuewilltake placeeither
at
the registryoffice
(01111
o'lepa pacnucamtcb
=
"Theygotmarried
yes
terday")or, often
in
citiesthese days, atamore elaborateWedding Palace .[loopetl 6paKoco'leriHni1;church canfollow the regist
ry
office.Ourcouple
napa
must make plans for theirhoneymoon
MeAOBbiH
MeCHI..I
,sendoutinvita tions npurnarneHHH, and organizeadinneror make reservationsata restaurant forthe wed ding feastorsupper
CBllAe6Hblif
JiKIIII,
oe•tep.Relatives
p6ACTBeHmtKH
must m
ee
toneano
th
er.Wedding clothesandthe requisitehouse hold equipment must alsocometogethe
r.
The following describesa moreelaborate marriage,especially
in
alargecitywherenowa daystheattempt
is
to restoresomesemblance
of
ceremon
y.
A
weddingcar decorated withinte
r
twined
rings
KOJibUaMII
pi
cksupthewedd
in
gparty, which includesthebride, groom,a
nd
tw
owitnessesCBIIAhemt.Thebrideisprobably wearinga white dress ifshehasnot previously b
ee
n married(ora pastelwilldo),and ahead dress
<f>aTa
thatoftenincludesa veiland
fl
owers.Thegroom wears adarksuit. Theyfirstgo toa waitingroom
Jail
OiKIIAaHHH
tomakes
ur
ethatallis
in
order,and finally themusiccoaAe6-
Hhtti Maprn
starts (Mendelssohnis likelybutnot obligatory).The wedding party entersthe wed ding hallwherethe marriage ceremony w
ill
be
performedbyoneto thr
ee
of
fi
cialsfrom
th
ereg istry office.
Thr
oughoutthe
Ru
ssianFedera
ti
on
thes
ub
stance
of
the ceremony hasthese basic element
s:
(I)
afewwords
to th
eyoung peopleonthesignifican
ce
of
th
e creation
of
anew
fam
ily;(2)theirmutualaffirmation
of
their desire
to
enterinto marriage;(3)theaffixing
of
signa tures; and (4)congratulations offeredby
th
eadministrator.
Th
elatterthengives
ou
tthe
rin
gsfor each,whicharewornon
th
e
ri
ght hand;
th
ey
26CONDUCT
are pronouncedhusbanda
nd
wife(oo'
h!lll
J
Bi
10
nac
~tyiKe~t
11
iKenoli):
th
ey
ki
ss;photographsarctaken;theweddingmar
ch
isheard: and
th
eparty exits,perhaps
to
anadjace
nt
rented
roorn
forchampagne,chocolate.a
nd
fl
owers, orper hapsto lay flowers at
th
e gr
av
e
of
the UnknownSoldier
or
to
some othermonument
or
site. (Thelatter new tradition isnot
ob
served among
th
eintelli
ge
nt
sia.) Theweddingceremony
it
se
lf
la
stsonlyafewminutes. The
e1·e
ningisfilledwitha weddingm
ea
l
coaAe611hlil
)'
iKJ1H
,oe'lep,whichsta
rt
s
out
witha supperbeginning withmany appeti
zers
andbottles
of
liquor orchampagne andwhich ends
in
anoisyfog. Somebody
's
uncleis
often
th
emasterofceremonies
TaMa~a
,
and
it
is
he
who startsthe toastsandsuggests
th
at perhaps
th
ewineor liquor isbitter:"It'sbitter!''
f6p~>Ko!
is shoutedhyeveryone,until
th
e
bride
andgroomkiss,tosweeten thingsup.
Though
three da
ys
off
of
workare granted
th
en
ew
l
y-
,weds,Russians do not haveour obligation
to
leavetownattheend
of
th
e ceremon
y-t
he
drinkingpa
rt
y can last seve
ral
days.
Ru
ssiansdoelopeTaihto
oeu•taiQTCSI
,
but
the
Ru
ss
ian
expression co
nn
otes o
nl
y asecr
et
m
ar
riage,withno
fli
g
ht
necessar
y.
The
verb
oeu•taTbCSI
has at its root
crow
n
oeHeu becacrowns a
rc
he
ld
overtheheads
of
the bride
and
groom
in
th
eRussian Orthodoxwedd
in
g
ser
·viceoeH•tamte. Thewedding ceremony at churchis
in
factquite similar to
th
echceremony.(Take anyopportunity toa
tt
en
dRussianOrthodoxC
hu
rch wedd
in
g
ce
many
-o
r funeral,forthatmatte
r.
Wearfortableshoes;nobodyexcept
th
einfirmallowed
to
si
t.
Womenwearskirtsinch Some wedding conventionsfrom
da
ysremain
in th
elang
ua
ge a
nd
,some
tim
es,
fact,
s
in
ce
th
eyfrequently
fi
ll
a con
te
need.Marriage brokerscoaT,coaxa were to arrange amarriagecoa
TO
BCTBO
.Theirwastochecko
ut
the families'requ including
th
e size
of
adowrynpnAanoe. agreeme
nt
cr6oop
wasreached, an
noMOJJBKa
was announced a
nd
forma
ll
yfirmed
in
a churchceremony
o6p

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