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Geography map reading

Geography map reading

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Published by Oboh Wellington
cool note on map reading
cool note on map reading

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Oboh Wellington on Aug 25, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/26/2012

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GeographyHistoryLanguage artsAges 5 to 1845-minute class periods
Making and reading maps in the 21st century
 Maps have long played an important role in exploration, commerce, and politics. Today, maps can provide a new depth of information and serve as an interactive tool for understanding the worldaround us.
Objectives
y
 
S
tudents will gain knowledge about the types of information (geographical, political, anddemographic) that digital maps can provide.
y
 
S
tudents will gain knowledge about various ways that users can interact with digital mapinformation.
y
 
S
tudents will gain an understanding of the general process of symbolic representation used inmaking maps.
y
 
S
tudents will gain an understanding of how map-making has changed in history.
y
 
S
tudents will develop skills for using digital maps to provide information or solve problems.
y
 
S
tudents will develop skills for using a variety of map tools and features, such as finding locations,getting directions, and using pushpin markers.
L
earning outcomes
S
tudents will use Bing maps to create a customized map project and present it to the class.
S
tudents will reflect on their experience of making and reading different kinds of maps that yielddifferent kinds of information.
L
esson procedure
Introduction
Maps are tools that we use every day to provide us with certain kinds of information about our world. We commonly understand a map to be a visual representation that shows all or part of theEarth¶s surface with geographic features, urban areas, roads, andother details. Although maps areordinarily used to show geography, they can represent any space, whether in the universe or thehuman body, and whether real or imagined. We talk, for example, about a map of the brain or a mapof Peter Pan¶s Never-Never Land. The name for the study and practice of making maps is³cartography.´ A person who makes a map is a cartographer.
 
Throughou
t
h
it
ory, geograph
i
a
l
maps have p
l
ayed an
i
mpor 
t
an
t
ro
l
e
i
n exp
l
ora
ti
on, commerce, and po
liti
cs. [how
t
he s
t
uden
t
s cop
i
es of maps from d
i
fferen
t
h
i
s
t
or 
i
ca
l
per 
i
ods and br 
i
ef 
l
y d
i
scuss
t
he
i
use and usefu
l
ness. You may wan
t
 
t
o consu
lt
 
M
aps and
M
apmakers: Three V
i
ews of 
t
he Wor 
l
dfor a
l
ook a
t
 
t
hree anc
i
en
t
and med
i
eva
l
mapmakers who revo
l
u
ti
on
i
ed
t
he way maps were made.]Today, w
it
h d
i
g
it
a
l
 
t
echno
l
ogy advances, maps can prov
i
de a new dep
t
h of 
i
nforma
ti
on and
i
n
t
erac
ti
v
it
y. Trad
iti
ona
l
maps, wh
il
e usefu
l
, are
li
m
it
ed
t
o one v
i
ew and can
i
nc
l
ude on
l
y a
li
m
it
edamoun
t
of 
i
nforma
ti
on. [how s
t
uden
t
s a h
i
s
t
or 
i
ca
l
map and po
i
n
t
ou
t
 
t
he k 
i
nd of 
i
nforma
ti
on
it
can prov
i
de.] Un
li
ke maps
i
n
t
he pas
t
,
Bi
ng maps and o
t
her d
i
g
it
a
l
mapp
i
ng programs are
i
n
t
erac
ti
ve.They can a
l
so show many d
i
fferen
t
v
i
ews of 
t
he same sub
 j
ec
t
a
t
once, for examp
l
e, changes
i
n sca
l
eand demograph
i
c
i
nforma
ti
on. [how s
t
uden
t
s one of 
t
he
i
n
t
erac
ti
ve demograph
i
c maps of census
t
rac
t
es
ti
ma
t
es or 
i
n
t
erac
ti
ve carbon em
i
ss
i
ons maps on
t
heoc
i
a
l
Exp
l
orer s
it
e. You can a
l
so shows
t
uden
t
s
t
he samp
l
e
Bi
ng maps pro
 j
ec
t
you crea
t
ed, h
i
gh
li
gh
ti
ng one or severa
l
 
i
n
t
erac
ti
ve fea
t
ures.]Wha
t
benef 
it
s and
li
m
it
a
ti
ons of 
t
rad
iti
ona
l
maps can you name? Wha
t
benef 
it
s and
li
m
it
a
ti
ons docon
t
emporary d
i
g
it
a
l
maps have? Wha
t
do you
t
h
i
nk 
i
s
t
he ma
i
n d
i
fference be
t
ween
t
hese
t
wo k 
i
ndsof maps?In
t
h
i
s
l
esson, you w
ill
 
l
earn how
t
o make
i
nformed use of new d
i
g
it
a
l
mapp
i
ng
i
nforma
ti
on and
t
oo
l
s. [Hand ou
t
 
t
he
li
s
t
you crea
t
ed of 
Bi
ng maps
t
oo
l
s. Us
i
ng
t
he
Bi
ng maps pro
 j
ec
t
you crea
t
ed,demons
t
ra
t
e how each of 
Bi
ng maps
t
oo
l
s on
t
he
li
s
t
can be used
t
o crea
t
e a cus
t
om
i
ed map. As youdemons
t
ra
t
e
t
he pro
 j
ec
t
, d
i
scuss
t
he process you used
t
o crea
t
e
t
he map. You may a
l
so w
i
sh
t
o shows
t
uden
t
s examp
l
es of 
Bi
ng maps pro
 j
ec
t
s crea
t
ed by s
t
uden
t
s
i
n prev
i
ous c
l
asses.][Ask each s
t
uden
t
 
t
o subm
it
an
i
dea for h
i
s or her own
Bi
ng maps pro
 j
ec
t
, or ass
i
gn each s
t
uden
t
a pro
 j
ec
t
.] The fo
ll
ow
i
ng are sugges
ti
ons for s
t
uden
t
pro
 j
ec
t
s:
Project
i
eas for students who are ages 5 to 10 years old
y
 
Us
i
ng
Bi
ng maps,
l
oca
t
e a p
l
ace your fam
il
y has v
i
s
it
ed. F
i
nd ou
t
how many peop
l
e
li
ve
t
here andhow far away
it
 
i
s from your home.
y
 
P
l
an a week-
l
ong fam
il
y vaca
ti
on w
it
h
i
n your reg
i
on. For each day, p
l
an an ac
ti
v
it
y, such as v
i
s
iti
ngan h
i
s
t
or 
i
c s
it
e, park, museum, or zoo. Try
t
o
t
rave
l
no more
t
han 200 m
il
es each day.
y
 
L
oca
t
e your favor 
it
e s
t
ore or p
l
ace of 
i
n
t
eres
t
 
i
n ano
t
her 
t
own on a d
i
g
it
a
l
map.
L
abe
l
 
t
he s
it
e, and br 
i
ef 
l
y descr 
i
 be
t
he reasons
t
ha
t
c
l
assma
t
es wou
l
d wan
t
 
t
o v
i
s
it
 
it
.
P
rov
i
de d
i
rec
ti
ons
t
o ge
t
 
t
herefrom your schoo
l
, fo
ll
ow
i
ng
t
hree d
i
fferen
t
rou
t
es. Wha
t
are
t
he advan
t
ages of each rou
t
e?
Project
i
deas for students who are ages 11 to 13 years old
y
 
Trace
t
he
L
ew
i
s & C
l
ark Tra
il
on a curren
t
map.
L
abe
l
 
i
mpor 
t
an
t
 
l
oca
ti
ons a
l
ong
t
he rou
t
e, andcompare
t
he d
i
fferences be
t
ween
li
fe a
l
ong
t
he rou
t
e
t
hen and now, us
i
ng demograph
i
c andgeograph
i
c da
t
a.
y
 
esearch demograph
i
c da
t
a abou
t
your 
t
own or c
it
y, compar 
i
ng how
t
he popu
l
a
ti
on and
t
he number of schoo
l
s have changed dur 
i
ng
t
he
l
as
t
20 years, and pro
 j
ec
ti
ng
t
rends
i
n
t
he nex
t
i
ve years.
y
 
P
l
ay "Where
i
n
t
he Wor 
l
d Am I?" w
it
h your c
l
assma
t
es. F
i
nd a
l
oca
ti
on somewhere
i
n
t
he wor 
l
d
t
ha
t
 you wou
l
d
li
ke
t
o v
i
s
it
, and research
it
s cu
lt
ure and a
tt
rac
ti
ons. Trace
t
he mos
t
d
i
rec
t
rou
t
e
t
o
t
he
l
oca
ti
on from your schoo
l
, prov
i
d
i
ng c
l
ues abou
t
 
t
he
l
oca
ti
on and
t
he rou
t
e you have se
l
ec
t
ed w
it
h
l
abe
l
s a
l
ong
t
he rou
t
e.
M
ake sure c
l
assma
t
es w
ill
uncover 
t
he
l
abe
l
s on
t
he map as
t
hey uncover 
t
herou
t
e and, f 
i
na
ll
y,
t
he
l
oca
ti
on.
y
 
Ask s
t
uden
t
s
t
o work 
i
n
t
eams
t
o research d
i
fferen
t
per 
i
ods
i
n
t
he h
i
s
t
ory of map-mak 
i
ng, w
it
h each
t
eam presen
ti
ng
t
he fo
ll
ow
i
ng pa
i
r of maps: one show
i
ng
t
he
i
nforma
ti
on mapped accord
i
ng
t
o o
l
der forms of represen
t
a
ti
on and
t
he o
t
her show
i
ng how a d
i
g
it
a
l
map wou
l
d d
i
sp
l
ay s
i
m
il
ar or d
i
fferen
t
 
i
nforma
ti
on abou
t
 
t
he p
l
ace.
Project
i
deas for students who are ages 14 to 18 years old
 
y
 
Ana
l
yze examp
l
es of a
t
opography map, re
li
ef map, hydrograph
i
c char 
t
, and d
i
g
it
a
l
map. Descr 
i
 be
t
he purposes of 
t
hese maps and how
t
hey are crea
t
ed.
y
 
esearch
t
he v
i
ab
ilit
y of s
t
ar 
ti
ng a bus
i
ness
i
n your 
t
own or c
it
y us
i
ng
i
nforma
ti
on such as popu
l
a
ti
on da
t
a
i
n spec
i
i
c reg
i
ons, number of compe
ti
ng bus
i
nesses
i
n your chosen
i
ndus
t
ry, ands
it
e access
i
 b
ilit
y.
y
 
De
t
erm
i
ne
t
he chang
i
ng
i
nfras
t
ruc
t
ure needs of a ma
 j
or c
it
y by
t
rack 
i
ng demograph
i
c and resource
t
rends. For 
i
ns
t
ance, how does popu
l
a
ti
on grow
t
h affec
t
 
t
he needs for hous
i
ng, roads, and pub
li
cserv
i
ces such as
li
 brar 
i
es and schoo
l
s?
M
ake sure
t
o eva
l
ua
t
e needs w
it
h
i
n sma
ll
reg
i
ons or 
t
err 
it
or 
i
es, ra
t
her 
t
han
t
he c
it
y or 
t
own as a who
l
e.
y
 
S
t
udy
t
he h
i
s
t
ory of car 
t
ography from anc
i
en
t
 
ti
mes
t
o
t
he presen
t
, focus
i
ng on
t
hree revo
l
u
ti
ons
i
nmapmak 
i
ng before
t
he
t
wen
ti
e
t
h cen
t
ury and compare
t
he curren
t
sh
i
t
 
t
o d
i
g
it
a
l
mapp
i
ng w
it
h
t
hesechanges. Crea
t
e maps for each ma
 j
or mapmak 
i
ng sh
i
t
s
t
ud
i
ed.
y
 
S
t
udy
t
he process of map-mak 
i
ng, focus
i
ng on
t
he use of symbo
l
s
t
o represen
t
an ac
t
ua
l
space. Haves
t
uden
t
s ana
l
yze
t
he symbo
l
s used
t
o represen
t
 
l
oca
ti
ons
i
n
t
rad
iti
ona
l
maps and d
i
g
it
a
l
maps andcrea
t
e
t
he
i
r own se
t
of symbo
l
s
t
o map a p
l
ace, crea
ti
ng maps
t
o
ill
us
t
ra
t
e each se
t
of symbo
l
s.
y
 
Crea
t
e a c
l
ass webs
it
e and embed
t
he
Bi
ng maps
t
ha
t
were crea
t
ed by s
t
uden
t
s on
t
he s
it
e.
B
efore s
t
uden
t
s beg
i
n work 
i
ng on
t
he
i
r pro
 j
ec
t
s, you may a
l
so wan
t
 
t
o do
t
he fo
ll
ow
i
ng:
y
 
He
l
 p s
t
uden
t
s deve
l
op a d
i
a
l
og abou
t
maps and how
t
hey can be used.
y
 
He
l
 p s
t
uden
t
s se
t
up
t
he
i
r ca
l
endars by "back 
t
rack 
i
ng" from
t
he
i
na
l
pro
 j
ec
t
due da
t
e and se
tti
ngdead
li
nes for 
t
he separa
t
e pro
 j
ec
t
e
l
emen
t
s.
y
 
Ass
i
s
t
s
t
uden
t
s w
it
h
t
he rev
i
ew of 
t
he se
t
of m
i
n
i
-
l
essons you crea
t
ed on sk 
ill
s needed
t
o comp
l
e
t
e
t
he pro
 j
ec
t
.Dur 
i
ng
t
he pro
 j
ec
t
you may wan
t
 
t
o:
y
 
A
ll
ow yourse
l
ti
me
t
o mee
t
w
it
h
i
nd
i
v
i
dua
l
s or 
t
eams
t
o assess progress and ass
i
s
t
 
i
n prob
l
emso
l
v
i
ng.
M
ake
t
h
i
s an assessmen
t
 
ti
me by check 
i
ng off and scor 
i
ng comp
l
e
t
ed e
l
emen
t
s.
y
 
B
e sure
t
o p
l
an for d
i
fferen
ti
a
ti
on or mod
i
i
ca
ti
on as needed for your d
i
verse group of 
l
earners.]
Student act
ii
ty
Fo
ll
ow
t
he s
t
eps be
l
ow
t
o gu
i
de your s
t
uden
t
s
t
hrough
t
h
i
s
l
esson p
l
an.
S
ee s
t
uden
t
handou
t
 
li
nk a
t
 
i
gh
t
.
y
 
S
t
ep 1: "Crea
t
e your 
Bi
ng maps pro
 j
ec
t
"
y
 
S
t
ep 2: "F
i
na
li
ze your 
Bi
ng maps pro
 j
ec
t
and presen
t
 
it
"
esources and web l
i
nks
y
 
Examp
l
es of 
t
rad
iti
ona
l
and d
i
g
it
a
l
maps. The fo
ll
ow
i
ng webs
it
es prov
i
de many examp
l
es:
o
 
T
i
me Char 
t
s of Car 
t
ography: Inc
l
udes a comprehens
i
ve
i
ndex of maps from anc
i
en
t
 
ti
mes
t
o
t
he presen
t
, w
it
h
li
nks
t
o
i
mages.
o
 
M
ap co
ll
ec
ti
ons:
P
rov
i
des access
t
o d
i
g
it
a
l
maps w
it
h
i
n
t
he Geography and
M
ap D
i
v
i
s
i
on of 
t
he
L
i
 brary of Congress from 1500
t
o
t
he presen
t
.
o
 
The Dav
i
d
umsey h
i
s
t
or 
i
ca
l
map co
ll
ec
ti
on: Offers more
t
han 8,800 on
li
ne maps
t
ha
t
focus on rare18
t
h- and 19
t
h-cen
t
ury Nor 
t
h and
S
ou
t
h Amer 
i
can maps.
o
 
On
li
ne encyc
l
oped
i
a: Use a s
it
e
t
ha
t
offers pho
t
ographs, h
i
s
t
or 
i
ca
l
 
ti
me
li
nes, graph
i
cs, and
t
ex
t
onv
i
t
ua
ll
y any sub
 j
ec
t
.
y
 
A
li
s
t
of 
t
he par 
ti
cu
l
ar 
Bi
ng maps
t
oo
l
s
t
ha
t
s
t
uden
t
s w
ill
use for 
t
he pro
 j
ec
t
. Th
i
s m
i
gh
t
 
i
nc
l
ude
t
hefo
ll
ow
i
ng:

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