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CITIES: The Death of Sprawl by Warren Karlenzig

CITIES: The Death of Sprawl by Warren Karlenzig

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In April 2009—just when people thought things couldn’t get worse in San Bernardino County, California—bulldozers demolished four perfectly good new houses and a dozen others still under construction in Victorville, 100 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles.

The structures’ granite countertops and Jacuzzis had been removed first. Then the walls came down and the remains were unceremoniously scrapped. A woman named Candy Sweet came by the site looking for wood and bartered a six-pack of cold Coronas for some of the splintered two-by-fours.

For a boomtown in one of the fastest-growing counties in the United States, things were suddenly looking pretty bleak. The adobe-colored two-story houses had been built by speculators in a desert region dubbed the “Inland Empire” by developers. The unsold homes faced vandalism and legal liabilities when the town’s average home sales prices dropped from well over $300,000 in 2007 to $120,000 in 2009. These plummeting prices pushed Victorville over the edge, making the city one of the nation’s foreclosure capitals.

After people began to ransack fixtures from the vacant homes, Victorville town officials warned the bank owning the sixteen-home development that it would be on the hook for security and fire calls. The bank, which had inherited the mess from the defaulted developer, assessed the hemorrhaging local real estate market and decided to cut its losses. A work crew was dispatched to rip the houses down and get what they could—money, beer, whatever—for the remains.
In April 2009—just when people thought things couldn’t get worse in San Bernardino County, California—bulldozers demolished four perfectly good new houses and a dozen others still under construction in Victorville, 100 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles.

The structures’ granite countertops and Jacuzzis had been removed first. Then the walls came down and the remains were unceremoniously scrapped. A woman named Candy Sweet came by the site looking for wood and bartered a six-pack of cold Coronas for some of the splintered two-by-fours.

For a boomtown in one of the fastest-growing counties in the United States, things were suddenly looking pretty bleak. The adobe-colored two-story houses had been built by speculators in a desert region dubbed the “Inland Empire” by developers. The unsold homes faced vandalism and legal liabilities when the town’s average home sales prices dropped from well over $300,000 in 2007 to $120,000 in 2009. These plummeting prices pushed Victorville over the edge, making the city one of the nation’s foreclosure capitals.

After people began to ransack fixtures from the vacant homes, Victorville town officials warned the bank owning the sixteen-home development that it would be on the hook for security and fire calls. The bank, which had inherited the mess from the defaulted developer, assessed the hemorrhaging local real estate market and decided to cut its losses. A work crew was dispatched to rip the houses down and get what they could—money, beer, whatever—for the remains.

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Published by: Post Carbon Institute on Aug 31, 2011
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The Post Carbon Reader Series: Cities, Towns, and Suburbs
The Death of Sprawl
Designing Urban Resilience for the Twenty-First-CenturyResource and Climate Crises
By Warren Karlenzig
 
About the Author
 Warren Karlenzig is president of Common Current.He has developed urban sustainability frameworks,recommendations, and metrics with agencies of allsizes around the world; his clients have included theUnited Nations, the U.S. Department of State, the White House Office of Science and Technology, theState of California, and the Asian Institute for Energy,Environment, and Sustainability. Warren is the authorof 
 How Green Is Your City? The SustainLane US City Rankings
(2007) and
 Blueprint for Greening Affordable Housing 
(1999). Karlenzig is a Fellow of Post CarbonInstitute.Post Carbon Institute© 2010613 4th Street, Suite 208Santa Rosa, California 95404 USAThis publication is an excerpted chapter from
The Post Carbon Reader: Managing the 21st Century’sSustainability Crises
, Richard Heinberg and DanielLerch, eds. (Healdsburg, CA: Watershed Media, 2010).For other book excerpts, permission to reprint, and purchasing visithttp://www.postcarbonreader.com.
 
T DAT F SPRAW1 T PST CARB RADR SRS
In April 2009—just when people thought thingscouldn’t get worse in San Bernardino County,California—bulldozers demolished four perfectlygood new houses and a dozen others still under con-struction in Victorville, 100 miles northeast of down-town Los Angeles.The structures’ granite countertops and Jacuzzis hadbeen removed first. Then the walls came down andthe remains were unceremoniously scrapped. A womannamed Candy Sweet came by the site looking for woodand bartered a six-pack of cold Coronas for some of thesplintered two-by-fours.
1
For a boomtown in one of the fastest-growing coun-ties in the United States, things were suddenly looking  pretty bleak.The adobe-colored two-story houses had been builtby speculators in a desert region dubbed the “InlandEmpire” by developers. The unsold homes faced van-dalism and legal liabilities when the town’s averagehome sales prices dropped from well over $300,000 in2007 to $120,000 in 2009. These plummeting prices pushed Victorville over the edge, making the city oneof the nation’s foreclosure capitals.
2
After people began to ransack fixtures from the vacanthomes, Victorville town officials warned the bankowning the sixteen-home development that it would beon the hook for security and fire calls. The bank, whichhad inherited the mess from the defaulted developer,assessed the hemorrhaging local real estate market anddecided to cut its losses. A work crew was dispatched torip the houses down and get what they could—money,beer, whatever—for the remains.
3
Boom and Bust
 Why did this town boom and then bust so spectacu-larly? After all, it followed a seemingly tried-and-truemodel of suburban growth that was replicated acrossthe United States for decades.To begin with, gasoline prices had risen from under$2 in the boom years to over $4 by 2008. Thanks tosuch massively increased personal transportation costs, Victorville by 2009 had an extremely thin marginbetween what people
thought 
they could afford and what they now
 actually
could afford. By one estimate,Americans as a whole spend $1.25 billion less on con-sumer goods for each one-cent increase in the price of gasoline.
4
Thus by 2008, compared to 2005, consum-ers nationwide had $250 billion
less
to spend on cars,furniture, appliances, and all the other items familiestypically purchase when moving into a growing arealike Victorville. To the alarm of real estate developers,city officials, and investors, the true total costs of living in Victorville (including gasoline and time spent com-muting) also weighed heavily against market valuation. Victorville’s residents are mostly dependent on privatecars to get to work—or anywhere else. The town has afew seldom-used local bus routes (less than 1 percentcommute ridership) and, statistically in 2007, close to
 zero
percent of people in town walked or rode bikes toget to work. Lacking other viable options, private carsare economic necessities in Victorville; they can also beserious economic burdens, especially in times of highgasoline prices (see figure 23.1). The same is true formillions of people living in similar exurban boom-towns across the U.S. Sun Belt.
5
 Mandatory car ownership is more than a nancial bur-den—it constantly drains people’s time and health as
Candy Sweet looks for lumber at a newly-demolished house in Victorville.

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