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ENERGY: Making Sense of Peak Oil and Energy Uncertainty by Daniel Lerch

ENERGY: Making Sense of Peak Oil and Energy Uncertainty by Daniel Lerch

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There are currently no viable substitutes for oil at current rates of consumption. Although alternatives to oil do exist for many of its uses, they are generally vastly inferior to oil in their energy content and in the ease of which they can be extracted, transported, and turned into a commerically-useable fuel.
There are currently no viable substitutes for oil at current rates of consumption. Although alternatives to oil do exist for many of its uses, they are generally vastly inferior to oil in their energy content and in the ease of which they can be extracted, transported, and turned into a commerically-useable fuel.

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Published by: Post Carbon Institute on Aug 31, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/03/2013

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The Post Carbon Reader Series: Energy
Making Sense of Peak Oiland Energy Uncertainty
By Daniel Lerch
 
About the Author
Daniel Lerch is the author of 
 Post Carbon Cities: Planning for Energy and Climate Uncertainty
(2007),the first major guidebook for local governments on peak oil and global warming. He has delivered presenta-tions and workshops to elected officials, planners, andother audiences across the United States, as well as inCanada, the British Isles, and Spain. Lerch is ProgramDirector of Post Carbon Institute.Post Carbon Institute© 2010613 4th Street, Suite 208Santa Rosa, California 95404 USAThis publication is an excerpted chapter from
The Post Carbon Reader: Managing the 21st Century’sSustainability Crises
, Richard Heinberg and DanielLerch, eds. (Healdsburg, CA: Watershed Media, 2010).For other book excerpts, permission to reprint, and purchasing visithttp://www.postcarbonreader.com.
 
MA SESE O PEA OL AD EER UCERTAT1 TE POST CARBO READER SERES
For over 65 years we have designed our communitiesfor oil. We’ve built nearly 47,000 miles of high-speedInterstate highways, a vast continental network forfuelling and servicing gasoline-powered vehicles, andmillions upon millions acres of car-dependent suburbs.This gargantuan legacy of long-term investments hasall been made with the assumption that the petroleumfuels which make the whole system work will be avail-able and affordable for the foreseeable futureBut global trends of oil supply and demand are chang-ing to such a degree that this assumption is no longerrealistic. Far more than a problem of higher prices atthe pump, the quickly emerging new energy realityhas enormous implications for just about every aspectof our lives. Forward-thinking households, businesses,and governments are now rushing to plan for anunprecedented energy crisis, the first phases of which we are already experiencing. What lies behind this 21st century energy crisis? Whycan’t we rely on the market to x a problem that is ulti-mately about supply and demand? To make sense of  what’s going on, we rst need to understand some of thebasics of how we harness and use energy, and the limita-tions of the various energy resources available to us.
Supply and Demand
Our supply of cheap, easy-to-extract “conventional” oil,from places like the flat plains of Texas and the des-erts of Saudi Arabia, is at or near permanent decline
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;the remaining “unconventional” oil, from places likethe tar sands of Canada and the depths of the Gulf of Mexico, is increasingly difficult to find, extract, andrefine. At the same time, global demand for petro-leum is sky-high at 85 million barrels per day—twiceas much as in 1969. That’s a lot of oil to keep pouring in to the pipelines to meet “business as usual” needs, letalone to meet new demand from growing countries likeChina and India. With the conventional oil dwindling and the uncon- ventional oil that’s replacing it increasingly problem-atic, there will inevitably come a point at which theflow of oil from the wells and the refineries will simplybe unable to keep up with global demand. The point at which total global oil production cannot grow any fur-ther and begins its permanent decline is known as “peakoil,” a term that was hardly known outside the petro-leum geology field as recently as 2004 but is rapidlyattracting attention and concern. A growing number of analysts and government agencies are acknowledging that we will have reached peak oil by 2015, if we haven’treached it already.
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The new energyreality has enormousimplications forjust about everyaspect of our lives.

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