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Armor Magazine, January-February 1991

Armor Magazine, January-February 1991

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10/25/2013

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For the second straight time in as manyyears, we begin a new calendar year with
US.
orces deployed abroad under condi-tions of imminent hostility. For those who liketo find lessons learned, there is a giganticone there
--
mostly for those who thoughtyou could fold up the Army like a tent andput
it
in storage until the next camping trip.There has been a lot of talk about readi-ness. (See p.
45
for clarification on
USR.)
And some would have everyone believe thatwe could be in for real trouble because ourbattalion and company commanders haveno combat experience, and our equipment islargely untested in battle. Let's
look
at therecord, after which we can formulate theanswer,
"So
what?"In
1918,
Rockenbach and Patton and Brettled the first Tank Corps into battle, essential-ly on an
OJT
footing. No combat-testedequipment here.Did the first Sherman tanks we gave theBritish to use
in
North Africa have a combattrack record? Nope. Was Creighton Abramsa hardened veteran
of
mobile, armored com-bat when he led the 37th Tank Battalion intobattle in Europe? Nope. Nor were many ofhis contemporaries
or
subordinates. Thewhole concept of mobile, armored warfarewas new to us in
1940,
and the
TOES
werechanged several times during the war toreflect new equipment and lessons learned.New equipment training took place near oron the front lines.Was the
M48
or
the
M113
a proventlefield workhorse in
1965?
Did mosttalion
or
company commanders in
Vie1
have combat experience? The answer
i!
now, obvious.
We
have nearly ahentered a major conflict the same wawith new, untested leaders and equipnSomehow, American soldiers andleaders learn quickly and get optimum
out
of any piece of equipment from hellto tanks.Korea was the exception. While weproven equipment and leaders, the
tent
been folded and put in storage.Compare the
U.S.
Army at the start ofwith the Army in
1917, 1940,
or
1965
you should see an Army that stands
I
and shoulders above those others in
qt
of equipment, training, and organizationan all-volunteer force that has enjoy(good decade of plentiful resourcing to
r
it
what it is today. The equipment is thein world, and our tactical unit leadershad the best training possible, short of acombat.And don't worry about our reservistsguardsmen. Never before have they beehighly trained and deployed
so
quickly.Just keep the ammo and chow coming.
By Order of the Secretary of the
Army:
CARL
E.
WON0
General, United States ArmyChief of StaffOfficial:THOMAS
F.
SIKORABrigadier General, United States
Army
The Adjutant General
 
ARMOR
I
The Professional Development Bulletin of the Armor Branch PB-
1
7-91
1
Editor-in-Chief
MAJOR PATRICK J. COONEY
Managing Editor
JON T. CLEMENS
Commandant
MG THOMAS C. FOLEY
ARMOR
(ISSN
0004-2420) is publishedbimonthly by the U.S. Army Armor Center, 4401Vine Grove Road, Fort Knox,
KY
40121.Disclaimer: The information contained inARMOR represents the professional opinions ofthe authors and does not necessarily reflect theofficial Army or
TRADOC
position, nor does itchange or supersede any informationpresented in other official Army publications.Official distribution is limited to one copy foreach heavy brigade headquarters, armoredcavalry regiment headquarters, armor battalionheadquarters, armored cavalry squadron head-quarters, reconnaissance squadron head-quarters, armored cavalry troop, armor com-pany, and motorized brigade headquarters ofthe United States Army. In addition, Armylibraries, Army and DOD schools,
HCl
DA andMACOM staff agencies with responsibility or ar-mored, direct fire, ground combat systems, or-ganizations, and the training of personnel forsuch organizations may request
two
copies bysending
a
military letter to the editor-in-chief.Authorized Content: ARMOR will print onlythose materials for which the
U.S.
Army ArmorCenter has proponency. That proponency
in-
cludes: all armored, direct-fire ground combatsystems that do not serve primarily as infantrycarriers; all weapons used exclusively in thesesystems or by CMF 19-series enlisted soldiers;any miscellaneous items
of
equipment whicharmor and armored cavalry organizations useexclusively; training for all SC 12A, 128, and12C officers and for all CMF-19series enlistedsoldiers; and information concerning the train-ing, logistics, history, and leadership of armorand armored cavalry units at the brigadelregi-ment level and below, to include Threat units atthose levels.Material may be reprinted, provided credit isgiven to ARMOR and to the author, exceptwhere copyright is indicated.
January-February
1991,
Vol.
C
No.
1
Features
8 Defeating the Iraqis
by Colonel Wallace Franz,
USA,
Ret.by Lieutenant Colonel David Eshel, IDF, Ret.
10 Obstacle Breaching Techniques14 Tactical Unit Pre-Combat Inspections
by Captain
(P)
James L. Boling
18 Making Light Forces More Flexible and Responsive
by Lieutenant Colonel Tom Rozman
Cavalry in the Defense:
A
Historical Vignette
by Captain Douglas
W.
Dunklinby First Lieutenant John
A.
Nag1
21
26
Tank Destroyers in
WWll
32 The Armored Gun System Debate:Let It Begin Before It
Is
Too Late
by Lieutenant Colonel James Etchechuty
35
The
French Armor Corps:
A
Branch in TransitionIn a Changing Army
by Major Timothy Decker
42 Combat Service Support in the Task Force Scout Platoon
by Captain Timothy Flanagan
45 Unit Status Reporting:
A
Broken System?
by The Directorate
of
Total Armor Force Readiness
In Memory: Major Charles E. Griffihs7
Departments
2 Letters 17 Armor Conference
2
Contacts 48 Bustle Rack
5
Commander’s Hatch
52
Books7 Driver’s Seat
Second-class official mail postage paid
ai
Fori
Knox,
KY,
and additional maillng offices. Postmastoter:Distribution
Restridlon:
Approved for public release; distribution
s
unlimited.
USPS
487-970Send address changes
to
Editor, ARMOR,
Am
TSEAM,
Fori
Knox,
KY
40121-5210.

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