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Jumping Through Hoops

Jumping Through Hoops

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Published by Marlyn Bennett
This is a report based on interviews with Aboriginal mothers involved with the child welfare system in Manitoba. The report was conducting during 2007-2008
This is a report based on interviews with Aboriginal mothers involved with the child welfare system in Manitoba. The report was conducting during 2007-2008

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Marlyn Bennett on Sep 01, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/03/2012

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“JUMPINGTHROUGHHOOPS”:
 
A MANITOBA STUDY EXAMININGTHE EXPERIENCES ANDREFLECTIONS OF ABORIGINALMOTHERS INVOLVED WITHCHILD WELFARE AND LEGALSYSTEMS RESPECTING CHILDPROTECTION MATTERS
By
 
Marlyn Bennett
First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada
A project report prepared or KaNi Kanichihk Inc. and the SteeringCommittee o the Family CourtDiversion Project
Winnipeg, Manitoba
 July 2008
 The research and production o thisreport was unded by Status o WomenCanada. This document presentsperspectives and opinions which do notrepresent oicial policies and/or opinionso the Status o Women Canada, Ka NiKanichihk Inc. or the First Nations Child &Family Caring Society o Canada Inc.
Painting featured by Mark Houston
 
II
| Examing the Experiences and Refections o Aboriginal Mothers
and Legal Systems
DEDICATION
:
 This study is dedicated to all the women who gaveo their time and energy to ill out the personalinormation orm and participated in the talking circlesand interview components o this study. Your strongvoices, stories and shared experiences have taught usmany things about your personal strengths throughwhich we have come to understand, with greaterreverence, the sacredness o motherhood and therights o all Aboriginal mothers and grandmothers totransmit their love and cultural knowledge to theirchildren and subsequent generations o children. The conclusions and recommendations are those o the author and research team. No oicial endorsementby ederal or provincial departments or First Nationsorganizations is intended or should be implied.Miigwetch rom …
Marlyn Bennett, Adrienne Reason and Linda Lamirande[the Research Team]
 This study is dedicated also to the memory o mymother Virginia Beaulieu/Roulette, who I have come toknow better in spirit than when she walked this earth. The women who participated in this study have taughtand helped me to understand the complexity o myown mother’s lie, both as an Aboriginal woman andas a mother, who struggled with child welare manytimes throughout her own lie beore she passed intothe spirit world at 32 years o age in 1976. And thoughshe does not now walk among the living, she is stillprooundly important in my lie and in the lives o mysiblings (as well as in the lives o her grandchildren). The memory o her courageous strengths andstruggles continue to guide me (and all o us who havedescended rom her womb)!
Forever loving you …Marlyn
 
JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS” |
III
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS :
 This document would not have been possible without the contribution o a number o people.Many thanks to the mothers and grandmothers who participated in this study and courageouslyshared their memories, experiences, stories and insights or this project and voiced their opinionsor change. The talking circles and interviews were very moving, proound and ull in so manyways – each women bravely revealed painul memories about diicult times, yet in doing so,they showed enormous strengthen and courage while providing great inormation and ideasor change. Each woman brought their own unique insights, wonderul energy and humourtoo – we have such deep respect or every woman who courageously stepped orward to shareher situation.Special thanks to my two research Assistants –
 Adrienne Reason
and
Linda Lamirande
who eachhelped interview the women involved in this study and provided immeasurable insight as theproject evolved.Special thanks to
Leslie Spillett 
and Ka Ni Kanichihk including the original and current memberso the Steering Committee or guiding the project and supporting the idea or this project:
Catherine Dunn
(Catherine L. Dunn Law Oice),
Margaret Haworth-Brockman
(Prairie Women’sHealth Centre o Excellence),
Cathy Rocke
(University o Manitoba, Aboriginal Focus Program),
Dr. Kathy Buddle Crowe
(Proessor, University o Manitoba),
Tracy Booth
(Elizabeth Fry Society),
Margaret Bartlett 
(Métis Child and Family Services Authority),
Ron Bewski 
(Province o Manitoba,Family Conciliation) and
Rhonda Cameron
(mother, student and community advocate).Miigwetch to
Margaret Haworth-Brockman
, the Executive Director and sta o the PrairieWomen’s Health Centre o Excellence including the two external reviewers or assisting in theEthics Review related to this project.Miigwetch in particular to
Corbin Shangreaux 
, Executive Director o Animikii Ozoson Inc. or useo the picture that appears on the ront cover o this report, which we used or many PowerPointpresentations and other reports in relation to this project. The painting o the mother and babyis the work o Aboriginal artist
Markus Houston
. I would also like to acknowledge the assistanceo 
Kelly MacDonald 
who shared the research she conducted with Aboriginal mothers in BritishColumbia. The Research Team would like to respectully recognize that this research and resulting reporttook place on the lands o the First Peoples o Canada; and lastly, This research was supported by a research grant rom Status o Women Canada. We grateullyacknowledge this contribution, without which this work would not have been possible.Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc. is a registered, non-proit; community based Aboriginal human servicesorganization governed by a council inclusive o First Nation and Métis peoples in Winnipeg.Ka Ni Kanichihk is committed to developing and delivering a range o programs and servicesthat ocus on wholesomeness and wellness and that builds on individual’s assets (gits) andresilience. Ka Ni Kanichihk’s mandate is to provide a range o culturally relevant education,training and employment, leadership and community development, as well as healing andwellness programs and services that are rooted in the restoration and reclamation o Indigenouscultures. Ka Ni Kanichihk means “those who lead” in the Ininew (Cree) language.Suggested Citation: Bennett, M. (2008).
 Jumping Through Hoops: A Manitoba Study ExaminingExperiences and Reflections of Aboriginal Mothers Involved with the Child Welfare and Legal SystemsRespecting Child Protection Matters
. A report prepared or Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc. and the SteeringCommittee o the Family Court Diversion Project. Winnipeg, MB: Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc. Availableonline at: http://www.kanikanichihk.ca and http://www.ncaringsociety.ca.Permission is granted to photocopy material or non-commercial use. Rights or all other usesmust be obtained by written permission rom the publisher (Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc.)Copyright © Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc. 2008ISBN # 978-0-9783134-1-8Copies o this report may be obtained by contacting the publisher o this report at:
Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc
455 McDermot AvenueWinnipeg, MBR3A 0B5P (204) 953-5820F (204) 953-5824www. kanikanichihk.ca

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