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The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012

The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012

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Switzerland tops the overall rankings in The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012. Singapore overtakes Sweden for second position. Northern and Western European countries dominate the top 10 with Sweden (3rd), Finland (4th), Germany (6th), the Netherlands (7th), Denmark (8th) and the United Kingdom (10th). Japan remains the second-ranked Asian economy at 9th place, despite falling three places since last year.

The United States continues its decline for the third year in a row, falling one more place to fifth position. In addition to the macroeconomic vulnerabilities that continue to build, some aspects of the United States’ institutional environment continue to raise concern among business leaders, particularly related to low public trust in politicians and concerns about government inefficiency. On a more positive note, banks and financial institutions are rebounding for the first time since the financial crisis and are assessed as somewhat sounder and more efficient.

Germany maintains a strong position within the Eurozone, although it goes down one position to sixth place, while the Netherlands (7th) improves by one position in the rankings, France drops three places to 18th, and Greece continues its downward trend to 90th. Competitiveness-enhancing reforms will play a key role in revitalizing growth in the region and tackling its key challenges, fiscal consolidation and persistent unemployment.

The results show that while competitiveness in advanced economies has stagnated over the past seven years, in many emerging markets it has improved, placing their growth on a more stable footing and mirroring the shift in economic activity from advanced to emerging economies.

The People’s Republic of China (26th) continues to lead the way among large developing economies, improving by one more place and solidifying its position among the top 30. Among the four other BRICS economies, South Africa (50th) and Brazil (53rd) move upwards while India (56th) and Russia (66th) experience small declines. Several Asian economies perform strongly, with Japan (9th) and Hong Kong SAR (11th) also in the top 20.
Switzerland tops the overall rankings in The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012. Singapore overtakes Sweden for second position. Northern and Western European countries dominate the top 10 with Sweden (3rd), Finland (4th), Germany (6th), the Netherlands (7th), Denmark (8th) and the United Kingdom (10th). Japan remains the second-ranked Asian economy at 9th place, despite falling three places since last year.

The United States continues its decline for the third year in a row, falling one more place to fifth position. In addition to the macroeconomic vulnerabilities that continue to build, some aspects of the United States’ institutional environment continue to raise concern among business leaders, particularly related to low public trust in politicians and concerns about government inefficiency. On a more positive note, banks and financial institutions are rebounding for the first time since the financial crisis and are assessed as somewhat sounder and more efficient.

Germany maintains a strong position within the Eurozone, although it goes down one position to sixth place, while the Netherlands (7th) improves by one position in the rankings, France drops three places to 18th, and Greece continues its downward trend to 90th. Competitiveness-enhancing reforms will play a key role in revitalizing growth in the region and tackling its key challenges, fiscal consolidation and persistent unemployment.

The results show that while competitiveness in advanced economies has stagnated over the past seven years, in many emerging markets it has improved, placing their growth on a more stable footing and mirroring the shift in economic activity from advanced to emerging economies.

The People’s Republic of China (26th) continues to lead the way among large developing economies, improving by one more place and solidifying its position among the top 30. Among the four other BRICS economies, South Africa (50th) and Brazil (53rd) move upwards while India (56th) and Russia (66th) experience small declines. Several Asian economies perform strongly, with Japan (9th) and Hong Kong SAR (11th) also in the top 20.

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Published by: World Economic Forum on Sep 06, 2011
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The GlobalCompetitiveness Report2011–2012
Klaus Schwab,
World Economic Forum
The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012 © 2011 World Economic Forum
 
The GlobalCompetitiveness Report011–2012
Professor Xavier Sala-i-Martin
Columbia UniversityChief Advisor of the Centre for Global Competitiveness and Performance
World Economic ForumGeneva, Switzerland 2011
Professor Klaus Schwab
World Economic ForumEditor
The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012 © 2011 World Economic Forum
 
The Global Competitiveness Report 2011– 2012 
is published by the World EconomicForum within the framework of the Centre forGlobal Competitiveness and Performance
Professor Klaus Schwab
Executive Chairman
Professor Xavier Sala-i-Martin
Chief Advisor of the Centre for GlobalCompetitiveness and Performance
Robert Greenhill
Chief Business Officer
CENTRE FOR GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS AND PERFORMANCE
Jennifer Blanke,
Senior Director, LeadEconomist, Head of the Centre for GlobalCompetitiveness and Performance
Beñat Bilbao-Osorio,
Associate Director,Economist
Roberto Crotti,
Junior QuantitativeEconomist
Margareta Drzeniek Hanouz,
Director,Senior Economist
Brindusa Fidanza,
Associate Director,Environmental Initiatives
Thierry Geiger,
Associate Director,Economist
iara Browne,
Associate Director
Pearl Samandari,
Community Manager
atu Kauhanen,
CoordinatorWe thank Hope Steele for her superb edit-ing work and Neil Weinberg for his excellentraphic design and layout. We are grateful toDjemila Zouyene for her invaluable researchssistance.The terms
country 
and
ation
as used in thisreport do not in all cases refer to a territorialntity that is a state as understood by inter national law and practice. The terms coverell-defined, geographically self-containedconomic areas that may not be states butor which statistical data are maintained on aeparate and independent basis.orld Economic ForumGenevaCopyright © 2011by the World Economic Forumll rights reserved. No part of this publicationmay be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system,r transmitted, in any form or by any means,lectronic, mechanical, photocopying, or other ise without the prior permission of the Worldconomic Forum.SBN-13: 978-92-95044-74-6SBN-10: 92-95044-74-6his book is printed on paper suitable forrecycling and made from fully managed andustained forest sources.rinted and bound in Switzerland by SRO-Kundig.
The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012 © 2011 World Economic Forum

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