Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Murder on Music Row Excerpt

Murder on Music Row Excerpt

Ratings: (0)|Views: 488 |Likes:
Published by BlairPublisher
"Remember your first John Grisham? Country music veteran Dill (he served as a personal manager for Minnie Pearl, Dwight Yoakam, and other greats) doesn’t miss a beat in this debut high-adrenaline thriller full of twists and turns."
Library Journal, starred review

"Dill, who has served as the personal manager for Minnie Pearl, Billy Ray Cyrus, and other notables in the Nashville country music world, brings his insider’s expertise to his solid debut, a mystery thriller...the conclusion is stunning."
Publishers Weekly

Twenty-three-year-old Judd Nix, an unpaid intern at the most prestigious personal management firm in country music, get the opportunity of a lifetime when his boss and mentor, Simon Stills, offers him a temporary position—an opportunity that may just cost Judd his life.

In a landscape where record companies are under siege, stuck in the order of physical CDs and antiquated technologies, Simon's young, electrifying star, Ripley Graham, has emerged as the best-selling digital artist in music history. Meanwhile, Ripley's label, Galaxy Records, is preparing a secret merger agreement that would create the largest record conglomerate in the world. Trouble arises when rumors spread that Ripley and Simon are withholding Ripley's new album in hopes of renegotiating his contract.

When Simon and Judd are shot on the famed Grand Ole Opry stage during the filming of Ripley's new music video, no one is more upset than Ripley—especially as everyone assumes the shots were meant for him. While Simon's life hangs in the balance, Judd seeks help from Megan Olsen, Simon's right hand and Ripley's day-to-day manager. The two set off on a high-powered chase to disclose the real motive behind the shootings and spare Ripley from a second murder attempt.

Murder on Music Row leads readers through a maze of twists and turns that connect Nashville, New York, Los Angeles, and London in a behind-the-scenes look at an industry where there are no limits in the pursuit of money, power, and fame.
"Remember your first John Grisham? Country music veteran Dill (he served as a personal manager for Minnie Pearl, Dwight Yoakam, and other greats) doesn’t miss a beat in this debut high-adrenaline thriller full of twists and turns."
Library Journal, starred review

"Dill, who has served as the personal manager for Minnie Pearl, Billy Ray Cyrus, and other notables in the Nashville country music world, brings his insider’s expertise to his solid debut, a mystery thriller...the conclusion is stunning."
Publishers Weekly

Twenty-three-year-old Judd Nix, an unpaid intern at the most prestigious personal management firm in country music, get the opportunity of a lifetime when his boss and mentor, Simon Stills, offers him a temporary position—an opportunity that may just cost Judd his life.

In a landscape where record companies are under siege, stuck in the order of physical CDs and antiquated technologies, Simon's young, electrifying star, Ripley Graham, has emerged as the best-selling digital artist in music history. Meanwhile, Ripley's label, Galaxy Records, is preparing a secret merger agreement that would create the largest record conglomerate in the world. Trouble arises when rumors spread that Ripley and Simon are withholding Ripley's new album in hopes of renegotiating his contract.

When Simon and Judd are shot on the famed Grand Ole Opry stage during the filming of Ripley's new music video, no one is more upset than Ripley—especially as everyone assumes the shots were meant for him. While Simon's life hangs in the balance, Judd seeks help from Megan Olsen, Simon's right hand and Ripley's day-to-day manager. The two set off on a high-powered chase to disclose the real motive behind the shootings and spare Ripley from a second murder attempt.

Murder on Music Row leads readers through a maze of twists and turns that connect Nashville, New York, Los Angeles, and London in a behind-the-scenes look at an industry where there are no limits in the pursuit of money, power, and fame.

More info:

Published by: BlairPublisher on Sep 07, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/16/2014

pdf

text

original

 
GreenvilleBI-LO Center 
Te entire backstage area had now been cleared, as was the cus-tom, making it ready or Ripley to walk rom his dressing room tothe stage without being seen. Pumpkin stood near with a small ash-light in his hand as Simon cracked the door and said, “Rip, we’ve gotto go.”A moment later, Ripley bolted out, head down, showing no emo-tion. He put his black cowboy hat on and started toward the stage.“You okay, pal?” Simon asked as Pumpkin and Nate, Ripley’sother bodyguard, stepped out in ront. Jerome and Simon ankedRipley on either side as they walked. “You look a little pale.Ripley,not looking over, said, “Just get me to the stage and I’ll be ne.”“Sure,” Simon said. “We were talking aer sound check today about the problem with the opening stunt. We’re all concerned thatit never worked well at the rehearsals. So this is what we came upwith. Beore you step onto the launching pad under the stage, takeyour boots of. No one will ever notice that you’re not wearing themwith the cannon blast, the pyro blazing, and you being propelled intothe arena. I promise.”Ripley kept walking and gave no response.Simon continued, “Ten we’ll kill the lights as you ree-all to thestage and hit the saety net. When you land, two production handswill be there with your boots. Tey’ll help you put them on and getyou over to the drum platorm. I we do it like that, there is no way Excerpted rom
 Murder on Music Row A Music Industry Triller 
Stuart Dill
 
your boots will get tangled in the net like they did today at soundcheck.”Ripley turned to Simon and said, “So you didn’t get it worked outthis aernoon, did you?”“Yes and no. Tey ound the smaller netting we need, but they can’t get it here until tomorrow.”“Simon, I’m not talking about the damn saety net,” Ripley said.“I’m talking about my career. You didn’t get anywhere with the re-cord company, did you? I bet James Clark didn’t even call you back.Hes probably out playing gol while were here working our asses of.It’s a disgrace to country music that he heads a Nashville label.”Simon, changing his tone, said, “Sorry. For some strange rea-son, my mind was on the superhuman stunt you’re about to try inront o een thousand screaming ans or the rst time, and wedon’t know i it works. Actually, I spoke with Clark, and there is nomovement. We are at a total impasse in trying to renegotiate yourrecord contract. Clark said no to our request to allow you to ulti-mately own your recordings—the uture reversion clause—and no toan increased royalty rate, and he is adamant that this record will bemarketed out o Nashville, not out o New York like we’ve demanded.I told him that was unacceptable, and that our position remains thesame—you will not turn in new music to Galaxy until all these issuesare resolved. I made it clear we will continue to hold out, and thateven though the music tracking sessions are done, you’re not singinga note on the new album. We’re boycotting.”Ripley exploded. “Who the hell does he think he is?Simon answered, “Well, he thinks he’s the president o Galaxy Records Nashville.”“I am selling more damn records than any other human on thisplanet, and he still thinks I’m some backwoods country hillbilly thatdoesn’t get the scam he’s running. People have got to know, Simon.Tey think I’m making all this money of record sales, and the truthis the record company is stealing me blind! No other industry inAmerica could get away with this. Where are the labor laws? Tey don’t exist or me, Simon. I’m a prisoner being screwed by the record
2
Murder on Music Row
 
company, and no one’s got my back. I want a new contract!”“Ripley, look. Te truth is, you have a signed, legally binding dealin place, and James Clark is not in any position to give you anythingbut the record-company line. He is not going to turn this over toNew York and undermine his own existence. We’re going to have togo above him—to ommy Strickland in New York. Ultimately, wemay have to go to Warren MacCabe himsel.”Ripley wasn’t really listening. “My signed deal is not industry standard anymore. Te music industry is in shambles. I’m now thestandard bearer. And in the meantime, Galaxy is giving Clark bo-nuses out the ass, like he had something to do with my success. Hewasn’t even with the company when I signed my record deal. Didyou know he just bought a Hummer?”“I didn’t know that.”“He is so damn arrogant, man. He’s just a washed-up recordproducer whose dad was some legendary songwriter y years ago.Nashville needs label presidents that understand marketing. oday,it’s all about marketing. Tat’s the diference between Nashville andNew York. Nashville still thinks it’s the music. New York knows it’smarketing, and they have the cash to back it up. It’s the marketingo the music that makes hit records. And because o that blind ig-norance, Nashville keeps making record producers the presidents o labels. Te president o a record company doesn’t need to know howto make a record. Te president o a record label needs to know howto sell a record. Te last thing Nashville needs is another old recordproducer promoted to label head so he can drive around Music Rowin his goddamn Hummer screaming, ‘Look at me. I’m the man!’ ”Tey reached the backstage landing area, rom which severalramps led onto the back o the stage itsel and a carpeted walkway underneath. A printed sign with a arrow pointing in the direction o the carpet read, “Launching Pad.” Pumpkin, staying close but de-nitely not getting involved in the conversation, checked Ripley’s earmonitors and the battery pack on his belt and then handed Ripley his microphone. Ripley ducked and ollowed Jerome’s lead, walkinghal bent down the carpet, weaving through the metal scafolding
3
Stuart Dill

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->