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Table Of Contents

1.2. EPR AND BELL’S INEQUALITIES 11
1.3. THE LANDAUER PRINCIPLE 21
2.9 Quantum error correction codes
2.10 Lasers: a heuristic introduction
2.11. QUANTUM COMPUTING DEVICES AND REQUIREMENTS 91
Two-Level Atoms and Cavity QED
3.1 Two-level atoms
3.1.1 Atom–light interaction
3.1.2 Reduction to a 2-level atom
3.1.3 Single atom qubit rotation
3.1.4 Two-level atom hardware
3.2 Quantization of the electromagnetic field
3.2.1 Normal mode expansion
3.2.2 Field mode quantization; the harmonic oscillator
3.2.3 Energy spectrum and stationary states
3.3 Cavity QED
3.3.1 A brief historical account of cavity QED
3.3.2 Cavity hardware
3.4. CAVITY QED FOR THE QUANTUM PHASE GATE 123
3.4 Cavity QED for the quantum phase gate
3.4.1 Atom-cavity Hamiltonian
3.4.2 Large detuning limit
3.4.3 Two-qubit operation
3.4.5 Atom-cavity hardware
3.5 Quantum eraser
3.6 Quantum disentanglement eraser
Imperfect Quantum Operations
4.1 Fidelity
4.2 Density matrices
4.3. TIME EVOLUTION OF DENSITY MATRICES 155
4.3 Time evolution of density matrices
4.3.1 The von Neumann equation
4.3.2 Quantum operations
4.3.3 The Kraus representation theorem
4.3.4 Quantum Markov processes
4.3.5 Non-Markovian environments
4.4 Examples of master equations
4.4.1 Leaky cavity
4.4.2 Unstable 2-level system
4.4.3 Dephasing
4.5 Fidelity calculations
4.5.1 Fluctuating gate parameters
4.5.2 Spontaneous decay
Quantum Computation Using Cold, Confined Atomic Ions
5.1 Introduction
5.2. ION CONFINEMENT, COOLING, AND CONDENSATION 177
5.2 Ion confinement, cooling, and condensa- tion
5.2.1 Confinement: several types of ion traps
5.2.2 Ion cooling and condensation
5.3 Ion qubits
5.4 Summary of ion preparation
5.5 Coherence
5.5.1 Coherence of the motional qubit
5.5.2 Coherence of the internal qubit
5.5.3 Coherence in logic operations
5.5.5 Summary of ion coherence
5.6 Quantum gates
5.6.1 General considerations
5.6.2 Cirac–Zoller CNOT gate
5.6.3 Wave packet or Debye–Waller CNOT gate
5.6.4 Sørensen–Mølmer gate
5.6.5 Geometrical phase gate
5.6.6 Summary of quantum gates
5.7 A vision of a large scale confined-ion quantum computer
5.8. TRAP ARCHITECTURE AND PERFORMANCE 235
5.8 Trap architecture and performance
5.9. TELEPORTATION OF COHERENT INFORMATION 237
5.9 Teleportation of coherent information
5.10 Experimental DFS logic gates
5.11 Quantum error correction by ion traps
6.3.2 Magnetic interaction
6.3.3 Cold, controlled atom–atom interactions
6.4 Atom trapping
6.4.1 Optical lattices
6.4.2 Focused laser traps
6.4.3 Static magnetic traps
6.5 Qubits and gates
6.5.1 Single qubit gates based on internal states
6.5.2 Single qubit gates based on external states
6.6 Controlled 2-qubit gates
6.6.1 Cold, controlled collisions in an optical lattice
6.6.2 Molecular interactions in an optical lattice
6.6.6 Quantum phase gate on an atom chip
6.7 Coherence properties of atom gates
6.8 Recapitulation: atomic data tables for atoms and ions
6.8.1 Ions
6.8.2 Atoms
6.9 Assessment
7.1 Introduction
7.1.3 A simple quantum dot for quantum computing
7.1.4 Spintronics
7.1.5 Three major designs of QD-based quantum gates
7.2 Electrons in quantum dots microcavity
7.2.1 Resonance, 1-bit and CNOT gates
7.2.2 Decoherence and measurement
7.3 Coupled electron spins in an array of quantum dots
7.3.1 Electron spin
7.3.2 The design due to D. Loss and D. DiVincenzo
7.3.3 Model of two identical laterally coupled quantum dots
7.3.5 Decoherence and measurement
7.3.6 New advances
7.4. BIEXCITON IN A SINGLE QUANTUM DOT 333
7.4 Biexciton in a single quantum dot
7.4.2 Decoherence and measurement
7.4.3 Proposals for coupling of two or more biexciton QD
7.5 Conclusions
Linear Optics Computers
8.1 Classical electrodynamics— Classical computers
8.1.1 Light beam manipulation with four degrees of freedom
8.1.2 Optical circuits and examples
8.1.3 Complexity issues of LOCC and alternatives
8.2 Quantum electrodynamics— Quantum computers
8.2.1 Quantum optical states
8.2.3 The approach of Knill, Laflamme and Milburn
8.2.4 Quantum teleportation
8.2.5 Application of quantum teleportation to LOQC
8.3 Summary and outlook
Superconducting Quantum Computing Devices
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Superconductivity
9.4. SUPERCONDUCTING CIRCUITS: CLASSICAL 413
9.4 Superconducting circuits: classical
9.4.1 Current-biased JJ
9.4.2 Single Cooper-pair box (SCB)
9.4.3 rf- or ac-SQUID
9.4.4 dc-SQUID
9.5 Superconducting circuits: quantum
9.6 Quantum gates
9.6.1 One qubit operation: charge-qubit
9.6.2 Flux-qubit, charge-flux qubit and phase qubit
9.6.3 Two-qubit operations
NMR Quantum Computing
10.1 Nuclear magnetic resonance
10.1.1 Introduction
10.1.2 More about the Hamiltonian of NMR
10.1.3 Organization of the chapter
10.2 Basic technology used in quantum com- putation with NMR
10.2.1 Realization of a qubit
10.2.2 Construction of quantum gates
10.2.3 Initialization
10.2.4 Measurement
10.3 Solid state NMR
10.4.1 Shor’salgorithm(“hardwired”NMRexperiment)
10.4.2 Circuit design for Shor’s algorithm
10.4.3 Experimental result
10.5. QUANTUM ALGORITHM FOR LATTICE-GAS SYSTEMS 477
10.5 Quantum algorithm for lattice-gas systems
10.5.1 Quantum algorithm for a lattice-gas model
10.5.2 Physical realization and result
10.6 Conclusion
Appendices
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Quantum Computing Divices

Quantum Computing Divices

Ratings: (0)|Views: 9,229|Likes:
Published by Jose Ramirez
By Goon Chen, et al.
(1) The first three chapters explain the basic ideas, fundamentals, and algorithms
of quantum computing and information, quantum systems,
operations and formalisms.
(2) Chapters 3 and 5–10 cover the most promising candidates for the future
quantum computer, namely Cavity QED, ion traps, neutral atom
traps, quantum dots, linear optics, superconducting quantum interference
devices (SQUID), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).
(3) For each device, we discuss the physical properties of the quantum
system, the setup of qubits, the control actions that bring about the
quantum gates which are universal for quantum computing, the measurements,
and decoherence properties of the system.
By Goon Chen, et al.
(1) The first three chapters explain the basic ideas, fundamentals, and algorithms
of quantum computing and information, quantum systems,
operations and formalisms.
(2) Chapters 3 and 5–10 cover the most promising candidates for the future
quantum computer, namely Cavity QED, ion traps, neutral atom
traps, quantum dots, linear optics, superconducting quantum interference
devices (SQUID), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).
(3) For each device, we discuss the physical properties of the quantum
system, the setup of qubits, the control actions that bring about the
quantum gates which are universal for quantum computing, the measurements,
and decoherence properties of the system.

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Published by: Jose Ramirez on Sep 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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