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The Social Security Benefits of Sitting Senators Revisited

The Social Security Benefits of Sitting Senators Revisited

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Social Security has just entered its 77th year as an essential source of economic security for millions of Americans in their retirement. However, some politicians – such as Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Governor Rick Perry of Texas – have recently said that Social Security is bankrupt and will not be there for them or their children. This is not an accurate assessment. The latest projections from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) show that Social Security will remain fully solvent through 2038. Even if Congress makes no further changes to the program, Social Security will be able to pay slightly more than 80 percent of scheduled benefits from 2039 on.

CEPR has updated its table (incorporating the newest CBO projections) to show the scheduled Social Security benefit for each current member of the Senate.
Social Security has just entered its 77th year as an essential source of economic security for millions of Americans in their retirement. However, some politicians – such as Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Governor Rick Perry of Texas – have recently said that Social Security is bankrupt and will not be there for them or their children. This is not an accurate assessment. The latest projections from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) show that Social Security will remain fully solvent through 2038. Even if Congress makes no further changes to the program, Social Security will be able to pay slightly more than 80 percent of scheduled benefits from 2039 on.

CEPR has updated its table (incorporating the newest CBO projections) to show the scheduled Social Security benefit for each current member of the Senate.

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Published by: Center for Economic and Policy Research on Sep 09, 2011
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10/16/2012

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 Issue Brief

September 2011
*Dean Baker is an economist and Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. Kris Warner is a Program Assistant at CEPR.
 The Social Security Benefits of Sitting Senators Revisited
Social Security has just entered its 77
th
year as an essential source of economic security for millions of Americans in their retirement. However,some politicians
 – 
such as Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Governor Rick Perry of Texas
 – 
have recently said that Social Security is bankrupt and willnot be there for them or their children. This is not an accurate assessment. The latest projections from theCongressional Budget Office (CBO) show that Social Security will remainfully solvent through 2038. Even if Congress makes no further changes tothe program, Social Security will be able to pay slightly more than 80 percentof scheduled benefits from 2039 on. As pointed out in a recent letter toSenator Rubio, this means he can expect to receive a benefit of $41,439 if heretires at age 67 in 2038 and at least $33,151 (both in 2011 dollars) fromthen on. In other words, the projections show that Social Security willcontinue to exist and pay a substantial benefit to retirees indefinitely.CEPR has updated the table below (incorporating the newest CBOprojections) to show the scheduled Social Security benefit for each currentmember of the Senate. The table also shows the payable benefit assuming that the projections for the program prove accurate and there are no furtherchanges to the program. (Congress has made numerous changes in priordecades, most recently based on the recommendations of the NationalCommission on Social Security Reform in 1983.) This table is intended to help inform Senators
 – 
as well as other membersCongress and the general public
 – 
in understanding and making decisionsabout the future of Social Security. Hopefully this will help preventinaccurate or misleading statements about Social Security as discussion of federal budgets and deficits continues.
Center for Economic andPolicy Research
1611 Connecticut Ave, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20009tel: 202-293-5380fax: 202-588-1356 www.cepr.net
B
 Y 
D
EAN
B
 AKER AND
RIS
 W 
 ARNER 
*

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