Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
4Activity

Table Of Contents

COMBINATION VERSUS MONOPOLY
HOW NOT TO DEAL WITH TRUSTS
MONOPOLIES AND THE LAW
MONOPOLIES AND THE LAW:—DESTRUCTIVE COMPETITION
WHAT MORE IS NEEDED
CONSTRUCTIVE COMPETITION
CONCLUSION AND SUMMARY
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
John B Clark & John M Clark - The Control of Trusts (1914)

John B Clark & John M Clark - The Control of Trusts (1914)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 93 |Likes:
Published by sandpit
The American economist John Maurice Clark (1884-1963) is perhaps the best-known forerunner of the American economists who are sometimes referred to as the pragmatic school.

John Maurice Clark was born in Northampton, Mass. He graduated from nearby Amherst College in 1905 and did his graduate study in economics at Columbia University, where he received his doctorate in 1910. He instructed at Colorado College (1908-1910) and at Amherst College (1910-1915) until he joined the faculty of political economy at the University of Chicago, where his colleagues included Jacob Viner and Frank Knight. In 1926 he left Chicago to accept a professorship at Columbia, where he remained until he retired in 1957, completing a half century of uninterrupted teaching and productive scholarship.

Clark's works, while primarily theoretical in content, were almost always directed toward clarifying and solving practical economic issues. He skillfully built his own analytical treatises upon the logic underlying the rigorously formulated models of others, first the marginalists and later Edward H. Chamberlin and Joan Robinson. In contrast with the methodology of these scholars, and of the younger mathematical economists who rose to prominence during the latter part of his professional life, Clark's methodology relied on the written word rather than geometric and algebraic formulations.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/john-maurice-clark#ixzz1XkkfCWV0
The American economist John Maurice Clark (1884-1963) is perhaps the best-known forerunner of the American economists who are sometimes referred to as the pragmatic school.

John Maurice Clark was born in Northampton, Mass. He graduated from nearby Amherst College in 1905 and did his graduate study in economics at Columbia University, where he received his doctorate in 1910. He instructed at Colorado College (1908-1910) and at Amherst College (1910-1915) until he joined the faculty of political economy at the University of Chicago, where his colleagues included Jacob Viner and Frank Knight. In 1926 he left Chicago to accept a professorship at Columbia, where he remained until he retired in 1957, completing a half century of uninterrupted teaching and productive scholarship.

Clark's works, while primarily theoretical in content, were almost always directed toward clarifying and solving practical economic issues. He skillfully built his own analytical treatises upon the logic underlying the rigorously formulated models of others, first the marginalists and later Edward H. Chamberlin and Joan Robinson. In contrast with the methodology of these scholars, and of the younger mathematical economists who rose to prominence during the latter part of his professional life, Clark's methodology relied on the written word rather than geometric and algebraic formulations.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/john-maurice-clark#ixzz1XkkfCWV0

More info:

Published by: sandpit on Sep 12, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/08/2013

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 5 to 9 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 14 to 34 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 39 to 161 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 166 to 187 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 192 to 232 are not shown in this preview.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->