Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Burned: High Risk & Low Benefits for Workers in the NYC Restaurant Industry

Burned: High Risk & Low Benefits for Workers in the NYC Restaurant Industry

Ratings: (0)|Views: 406|Likes:
Published by ROCUnited
In 2009 ROC-NY released Burned: High Risks and Low Benefits for Workers in the New York City Restaurant Industry, an in-depth study of occupational safety and health and access to benefits in the New York City restaurant industry. The research included analysis of 502 restaurant worker surveys, 10 worker focus groups, and 35 employer interviews.

Our Findings

● 82% of workers surveyed reported being required to do a job that makes them feel they might be at risk of injury.
● Workers that have no access to healthcare benefits are more likely to engage in dangerous consumer health practices. 65% of all workers who engaged in any dangerous consumer health practice had no access to benefits, compared to 52% of the entire set of respondents who had no access to any benefits.
● 63% of restaurant workers reported having stiffness, pain, tightness, aching, or soreness in their legs, knees, and feet.
● 36% of workers surveyed have been cut on the job.
● 27% of workers surveyed have been burned on the job.
In 2009 ROC-NY released Burned: High Risks and Low Benefits for Workers in the New York City Restaurant Industry, an in-depth study of occupational safety and health and access to benefits in the New York City restaurant industry. The research included analysis of 502 restaurant worker surveys, 10 worker focus groups, and 35 employer interviews.

Our Findings

● 82% of workers surveyed reported being required to do a job that makes them feel they might be at risk of injury.
● Workers that have no access to healthcare benefits are more likely to engage in dangerous consumer health practices. 65% of all workers who engaged in any dangerous consumer health practice had no access to benefits, compared to 52% of the entire set of respondents who had no access to any benefits.
● 63% of restaurant workers reported having stiffness, pain, tightness, aching, or soreness in their legs, knees, and feet.
● 36% of workers surveyed have been cut on the job.
● 27% of workers surveyed have been burned on the job.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: ROCUnited on Sep 15, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/23/2014

pdf

text

original

 
By the Restaurant Opportunities Center o New York, the Restaurant OpportunitiesCenters United, the New York City Restaurant Health and Saety Taskorce, and theNew York City Restaurant Industry Coalition
High Riss and Lw Bns r Wrrs in h Nw Yr Ciy Rsaran Indsry
– September 11, 2009 –
 
2
BURNED
High Riss and Lw Bns r Wrrs in h Nw Yr Ciy Rsaran Indsry
– September 11, 2009 –
by h rsauan Oouniis Cn o Nw Yok, h rsauan OouniisCns Unid, h Nw Yok Ciy rsauan Halh and Say taskoc, and hNw Yok Ciy rsauan Indusy Coaliion
 
piay rsach Suo povidd y h Quns Collg Cn o h biology o Naual Syss and h Sliko Cn oOccuaional and envionnal mdicin a m. Sinaipiay Wiing Suo povidd y rsauan Oouniis Cns Unid and D. Nadia Isla o h Cn o h Sudy oAsian Aican Halh a Nw Yok Univsiy School o mdicinedioial Suo y Niuaa JayaaanGahic Dsign Suo povidd y Chisoh Chauphoogahy y Skou Lukpiay Funding y h Naional Insiu o Occuaional Say and Halh
 
 
BURNED
3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Te restaurant industry is one o the largest and astest-growing industries in New York City, despite the current eco-nomic crisis. However, most workers in this industry work in restaurants that put them at high risk o injury and illness,and provide them with little or no benets to cope with these challenges. Tese conditions increase the likelihood o  workers committing dangerous practices that place the health o the dining public at risk.
TWO ROADS TO PROFITABILITY
Our study reveals that there are two roads to protability in New York City’s restaurant industry – the“high road” and the “low road.” Restaurant employers who take the “high road” are the source o the best jobs in the industry – those that enable restaurant workers to support themselves and their amilies, remainhealthy, and advance in the industry. aking the “low road” to protability, on the other hand, createslow-wage jobs with long hours and ew benets. It ultimately harms workers, other restaurant employers,consumers, public health, and taxpayers.
1. OUR FINDINGS
Our study explored how occupational health exposures and job benets determine health status and health behaviors o restaurant workers.1) Stressul workplace conditions –demanding environments, exposure to toxic chemicals, and more - put workersat high risk o injury and illness. As a result, New York City restaurant workers reported that injuries and ill-nesses such as cuts, burns, chronic pain, and atigue occurred requently on the job.
82% o all workers surveyed reported being required to do a job that makes them eel they might be at
•
risk o injury.36% o all workers surveyed had been cut on the job.
•
27% o all workers surveyed had been burned on the job.
•
 Almost two-thirds o all restaurant workers (63%) reported having stiness, pain, tightness, aching, or
•
soreness in their legs, knees, and eet. A strong correlation was ound between being orced to do ast, repetitive work and being burned at the
•
current job.
2) Workers with the most physically and mentally demanding jobs were least likely to have job benets such ashealth insurance and paid sick days.
 Workers without job benefts were signifcantly more likely to have suered rom musculoskeletal symp-
•
toms and respiratory symptoms.
3) Work-related injuries and illnesses such as burns, cuts, or alls, in combination with little or no access to health bene-ts, increased the likelihood o workers committing actions that put the health o the general dining public at risk.
98% o all workers who sneezed or coughed into the ood did not have paid sick days, compared to 91%
•
o all workers surveyed did not have paid sick days.80% o all workers who sneezed and coughed into the ood had no access to health insurance, compared
•
to 62% o all workers surveyed who had no access to health insurance.In total, 65% o all workers who engaged in any dangerous consumer health practice had no access to ben-
•
efts, compared to 52% o the entire set o respondents who had no access to any benefts.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->