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The Second Coming

The Second Coming

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Published by: api-3695841 on Oct 14, 2008
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03/18/2014

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THE SECOND COMING
BY GLENN PEASE
CONTENTS
1. THE END WILL COME Based on Matt. 24:1-14
2.
SIGNS OF THE TIMES Based on Matt. 24:1-14
3.
THE KEY SIGN OF THE END Based on Matt. 24:1-14
4.
THE GREAT TRIBULATION Based on Matt. 24:15-25
5.
THE SECOND COMINGS Based on Matt. 24:29-35
6.
THE SIGN-LESS COMING Based on Matt. 24:36-51
7.
THE SECOND COMING OF CHRIST Based on II Thess. 1:1f
8.
UNFULFILLED PROPHECIES Based on II THESS. 1:9 TO 2:2
9.

THE MAN OF SIN AND THE SECOND COMING. II THESS 2:3f
10. THE MAN OF SIN Based on II THESS. 2:5f
11. THE LAST DAYS Based on II Thess. 2:7-10
12. THE DAY OF JUDGMENT Based on II Thess. 2:18-f
13. WHEN WITHDRAWAL IS WISE Based on II Thess. 3:1f
14.

OPTIMISTIC PESSIMISM Based on Mark 13:1-2
15.
A WARNING ABOUT WARNINGS Based on Mark 13:3f
16.
ADVANCE THROUGH ARREST Based on Mark 13:9-13
1. THE END WILL COME Based on Matt. 24:1-14

Jesus had just preached a pre-funeral sermon in Matt. 23. Judaism, as a
religion representing the will of God in the world, was about to die, and Jesus
was giving it the last rights, but it was not a very pleasant experience.
Funerals, of course, never are, but pastors unusually try to find some good
word to say of the deceased.

When Calamity Jane died at 51, but looking like 70 because of her wild life
of prostitution and drunkenness, Dr. C. B. Clark, the Methodist pastor who
preached the service, concentrated on the small pox plague of 1878. Jane,
though a prostitute, bought drugs with her own money, and she nursed the
sick back to health. The man who lowered her coffin into the grave was C. H.
Robinson, who was nursed back to health by Jane. She lived an awful life,
but there was that one redeeming time of selfless caring, and that was the
focus at her funeral.

Jesus was not so kind in His pre-funeral sermon on the Jewish leaders of
His day. Matt. 23 is a sermon of 7 woes in which Jesus does not just blast
them with both barrels, but with a gattling gun of condemnation. We don't
want to immerse ourselves in this river of verbal blood-letting, but we need to
wade into it a little to get a feel for the context. Jesus left temple is the way
chapter 24 begins, but you have to look back to chapter 23 to see that it was
the last time he would set foot in the temple. He was not just leaving the
temple, but he was forsaking it. He was leaving it behind as a place no longer
to be the house of God. In fact, He says in 23:38, "Look, your house is left to
you desolate." It's your house now, said Jesus, and no longer is it what Jesus
called it in 23:13, "My house will be called a house of prayer."

What was God's house was now their house, for the rightful owner was
walking away, and leaving it empty of the presence of God. It was their house
now, and they could do as they please, for God was gone. His efforts to
reform the Jewish leaders had failed. They refused to repent, and so Jesus
lays on them the heaviest prophecy in all the Bible. It was a weight so heavy
that there is none to compare. To compare the burden that was going to come
on them with any other would be like comparing the Rock of Gibraltar to a
pebble.

Listen to these words of Jesus in Matt. 23:35-36. "And so upon you will
come all the righteous blood that has been shed on earth, from the blood of
righteous Abel to the blood of Zechariah son of Berakiah, whom your
murdered between the temple and the altar. I tell you the truth, all this will
come upon this generation." Why was Jesus picking on that generation to
suffer the wrath of God for all the murder of just men from the first to the
latest? That sounds unfair to hold them accountable for the whole history of
unjust murder.

What we see here is the principle that the more light people have, the
greater the accountability. They were the only generation in history who had
the light of the world in their very mist, and yet they refused to see. Others
had some excuse, for they did not see clearly the light of God's will. They had
some basis for their folly and rationalizing their actions. But not this
generation. They had the light shining full force in their eyes, and still they
refused to see. Such flagrant rejection of the truth led them to top off the sins
of all history by the ultimate sin of killing their own Messiah-the Son of God.
That was the last straw, and so upon that generation God was going to pour
out His wrath.

Having prophesied such doom on Israel, Jesus walks out of the temple
never to return. It was their house now and not His, and it would become
their tomb as well in 70A.D. The Jewish leaders just dismissed all this as the
ravings of a mad man. It was preposterous to think such a judgment would
fall on them. They looked on Jesus as if He were a chicken little yelling that
sky was falling. It was hard to believe, and so we see that even His disciples
tried to get Him to cool off and modify His radical words of judgment.

This, after all, was the temple. It was the place of God's dwelling, and the
pride of all Israel. They tried to get Jesus to reexamine His strong language
in the light of the beauty of the temple. In Mark 13:1, the parallel passage to
Matthew, one of the disciples said, "Master, behold what manner of stones
and what manner of buildings." Luke 21:5 is Dr. Luke's parallel passage,
and he has some of them speaking of how it was adorned with goodly stones
and offerings. Some of the disciples may have never been to the big city, and
they could be seeing the temple for the first time. They were deeply
impressed by it. The Jewish Talmud said, "He that never saw the temple of
Herod, never saw a fine building." It was started in 20 B. C., and was not
completed until 64 A. D., only 6 years before it was destroyed.

It was a marvelous piece of architecture made of white marble and much
gold. It was surrounded by great porches with solid marble pillars 37 and
one half feet high, and so thick that it took three men with arms linked to
reach around them. Some of the cornerstones have been found, and they
weigh more than 100 tons. It was like the Rock of Gibraltar, and so awesome
that the disciples, by their admiration, questioned the wisdom of Jesus in
abandoning the temple. They were so impressed, but Jesus was not impressed
with anything that did not promote the will of God, and so He pours water on

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