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Sufi Mysticism

Sufi Mysticism

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Published by: api-3702097 on Oct 14, 2008
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03/18/2014

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\u201cIn the East, there are great
sages and saints who sit quite
still, with lips closed, for years.
They are called,m u n i , which
means, "he who takes the vow of

silence." The m an of today may think, "What a life, to be silent and do nothing!" However, he

does not know that some, by their
silence, can do more than others
SUFI POET RY A ND
OT HER LECT URES
Written By
HAZRAT INAYAT KHAN
VOLUM E X
SUF I M YST ICISM , T H E PAT H OF
INIT IAT ION & DISCIPLESHIP;
SUFI POET RY A ND OT HER LECT URES
HAZRAT INAYAT KHAN
Pr ef ace

The eight chapters of Sufi Mysticism consist of lectures, delivered on various occasions, in which Hazrat Inayat Khan tried to explain something of the essence of mysticism. He also tried to give a glimpse of the life and work on earth of the mystics, those beings who, through their advanced state of evolution, and through their constant contact with the unseen and the unknown, "hold aloft the light of truth through the darkness of human ignorance," in the words of the Sufi invocation.

Because so many people are apprehensive of the word "initiation," believing it to mean a kind of mysterious ordeal one has to go through, Inayat Khan repeatedly explained its real significance \u2014 for example, in, The Way of Illumination, (Vol. I of this series, pp. 46-53). When asked what initiation involved, he often replied that it was "a blessing and a welcome." The Path of

Initiation and Discipleship is a collection of lectures and papers in

which the different stages and aspects of initiation and discipleship are set forth in a comprehensive form. It may serve as a guide to those who wish to learn more about the esoteric activity of the Sufi movement.

Coming himself from a long line of Sufis, both on his father\u2019s and on his mother\u2019s side, it is natural that Inayat Khan should have greatly revered the Sufi mystics and poets of the past. They have not only left an indelible mark on the poetry, religion, and philosophy of the east, but have also, in their own age and later, deeply influenced western thought. In Sufi Poetry, some of the greatest of these poets are described, their lives and their work, their experiences and their characteristics.

The divinity of art, its mystical aspects, and its social significance were subjects that were never far from Inayat Khan\u2019s mind. Before he left India in 1910, he was a famous musician, singer and poet. When he arrived in the west to bring his message of Sufi wisdom, he used his art, especially during the first years, not only as a means of livelihood, but also to convey the basic Sufi philosophical and mystical concepts to those who came to see and hear him.

Thus, one of the first series of lectures to appear in book form was The Mysticism of Sound. Another early series, calledMu si c, was published together with it in Volume II of the present edition. In order to make people in the west better acquainted with Sufi ideas, the Sufi movement also published in those early years several small volumes containing poetry by Persian and Indian Sufis, including translations of Inayat Khan\u2019s own poems. These will be republished in a later volume.

During the last two years of his life, the Pir-o-Murshid delivered a series of lectures on many different aspects of art, including painting, sculpture and architecture, which were published after his death under the title, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. It is this book which appears in the present volume in a slightly modified form.

Hazrat Inayat Khan\u2019s aesthetic standards differ, on some points, from the values that are generally accepted in the western world, as does the terminology he uses. It is necessary to bear this in mind when following the Sufi mystic\u2019s trend of thought. In fact, Inayat Khan always approached his subject as a mystic, whose principal aim in this case was to place art in its proper perspective, not so much as an achievement of man, but as a

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