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Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, And Momentous Discoveries

Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, And Momentous Discoveries

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Published by VelaPulsar
WHY SO FEW ? Why have only ten women won Nobel
Prizes in science when more than five hundred men have done so?
Ten out of several hundred—only two percent of all Nobel Prize sci-
entists are women.
The fifteen women portrayed here are Nobel-class scientists.
None is a typical, everyday researcher. They all either won a Nobel
Prize in science or played a critical role in discoveries that won a
Nobel for someone else.
Many of these women faced enormous obstacles. They were confined to
basement laboratories and attic offices. They crawled behind furni-
ture to attend science lectures. They worked in universities for
decades without pay as volunteers—in the United States as late as
the 1970s. Science was supposed to be tough, rigorous, and rational;
women were supposed to be soft, weak, and irrational. As a con-
sequence, women scientists were—by definition—unnatural beings.
Sandra Harding, writing about women in science from a feminist
perspective, concluded that “women have been more systematically
excluded from doing serious science than from performing any other
social activity except, perhaps, frontline warfare.”
WHY SO FEW ? Why have only ten women won Nobel
Prizes in science when more than five hundred men have done so?
Ten out of several hundred—only two percent of all Nobel Prize sci-
entists are women.
The fifteen women portrayed here are Nobel-class scientists.
None is a typical, everyday researcher. They all either won a Nobel
Prize in science or played a critical role in discoveries that won a
Nobel for someone else.
Many of these women faced enormous obstacles. They were confined to
basement laboratories and attic offices. They crawled behind furni-
ture to attend science lectures. They worked in universities for
decades without pay as volunteers—in the United States as late as
the 1970s. Science was supposed to be tough, rigorous, and rational;
women were supposed to be soft, weak, and irrational. As a con-
sequence, women scientists were—by definition—unnatural beings.
Sandra Harding, writing about women in science from a feminist
perspective, concluded that “women have been more systematically
excluded from doing serious science than from performing any other
social activity except, perhaps, frontline warfare.”

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Published by: VelaPulsar on Sep 23, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/05/2013

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Nobel Prize Womenin Science
Their Lives, Struggles, and  Momentous Discoveries 
SECOND EDITION
Sharon Bertsch McGrayne
 JOSEPH HENRY PRESS Washington, D.C.
 
Bare-breasted woman adorns the reverse of theNobel Prize medals for physics and chemistry.Copyright Nobel Foundation

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