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24-09-11 Troy Davis Protesters Occupy Wall Street

24-09-11 Troy Davis Protesters Occupy Wall Street

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Published by William J Greenberg
Less than twenty-four hours after the state of Georgia injected a cocktail of lethal drugs into the blood¬stream of Troy An¬thony Davis, the repercussions of his death hit the streets of New York City this Thursday with full force. A rally that was billed on¬line as a “Day of Outrage,” lived up to the name as it snow¬balled into a massive impromptu march through lower Manhattan.
Less than twenty-four hours after the state of Georgia injected a cocktail of lethal drugs into the blood¬stream of Troy An¬thony Davis, the repercussions of his death hit the streets of New York City this Thursday with full force. A rally that was billed on¬line as a “Day of Outrage,” lived up to the name as it snow¬balled into a massive impromptu march through lower Manhattan.

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Published by: William J Greenberg on Sep 25, 2011
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10/03/2011

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 Troy Davis Protesters Occupy Wall Street
Ryan DevereauxNew America Media/ News Report
Published: Saturday 24 September 2011People young and old, of all classes and colors, joined hands in a moment of silence to honor a man whom many believed died for a crime he didn’tcommit.
 
Less than twenty-four hours after the state of Georgia injected a cocktail of lethal drugs into the bloodstream of Troy Anthony Davis, the repercussions of his death hit the streets of New York City this Thursday with full force. A rally that was billed online as a “Day of Out rage,” lived upto the name as it snowballed into a massive impromptu march through lower Manhattan.People young and old, of all classes and colors, joined hands in a moment of silence to honor aman whom many believed died for a crime he didn’t commit. Some cried, many chanted. Withreferences to Jim Crow and legalized lynching, the collective indignation was palpable. Therewere impassioned monologues from anti-death penalty advocates, poets and people who simplyfound themselves moved by the moment.With little warning, the crowd, numbering in the high hundreds, decided to march. The destina-tion was unknown but the resolve was clear. The police did their best to keep up as the mass of mourners moved west down 14th Street, then south onto 5th Avenue.
 
Parents marched with children on their shoulders. Crust-punk activists joined demonstrators in pressed shirts, repeating the refrain, “The system is racist, they killed Troy Davis!” Wide-eyedManhattanites poured out of restaurants and businesses, camera phones in hand, to capture whatwas unfolding.As the number of marchers swelled it became evident that some of the spectators had trans-formed themselves into participants.With steadily increasing numbers –some estimate over a thousand – and a phalanx of marchingand scooter-mounted cops on its tail, the sea of demonstrators continued south. Word soonspread that the demonstration knew where it was headed: Wall Street.
Occupy Wall Street
For the last week an encampment of protesters executing a campaign known asOc cupy WallStreethave taken up residence at Trinity Place, a square roughly a thousand feet from the veryheart of global capitalism. They’ve renamed the space Liberty Plaza, and targeted their frustra-tion at a number of issues, including corporate greed and the unyielding influence of moneyedinterests on the U.S. political system.Illuminated by street lamps and police lights, the throng of Davis supporters was met with cheersand music provided by an estimated 500 Wall Street protesters. Within minutes dozens of NYPDofficers were attempting to physically force scores of demonstrators onto a strip of cement al-ready packed shoulder-to-shoulder with people.Protester Brandon King, 27, found himself caught between the police and the crowd. With his back turned to the officers, King was yanked from the crowd and slammed into the pavement; ar-rested on charges of obstruction of governmental administration, disorderly conduct and resistingarrest. King denies that he resisted, saying he went limp while officers punched him in the back.His arms bleeding, he was dragged away as a demonstrator screamed, “The whole world iswatching!” Indeed, there was no shortage of recording equipment documenting the moment.One young man, in an apparent attempt to put the situation in context, cried out to the police,“These people are marching peacefully for a dead man!”Joseph Jordan, 29, says he received similar treatment. He claims a senior police officer singledhim out, saying “I’m sick of you.” A number of officers then piled on top of him, making it im- possible to scream or breathe, he says.“I feel that their immediate response to us was that, ‘We don’t care about your anger. We don’tcare about your frustration. We don’t care about Troy,’” King said, following his release from jail the next day.

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