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Saugeen

Saugeen

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A brief history of the Metis fur trade community at Saugeen at the mouth of the Saugeen River on Lake Huron.
A brief history of the Metis fur trade community at Saugeen at the mouth of the Saugeen River on Lake Huron.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Lawrence J. Barkwell on Sep 27, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/09/2013

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Saugeen:
The historic settlement at Saugeen is commemorated by an Ontario plaque:“The Anishnabe lived by the mouth of the Saugeen River for centuries before PierrePiché arrived in 1818 to begin fur trading in the region. By 1826, the Hudson’s BayCompany established an outpost at Saguingue to compete with independent fur traderslike Piché. From La Cloche, its main post on Lake Huron, the Hudson’s Bay Companyemployed First Nations, French, Métis, and British fur traders who largely depended onAnishnabe hunters to supply deer, bear and marten skins. By 1832, the supply of premium furs was exhausted and the company closed its post. Although many Anishnabegave up hunting and settled in an agricultural village, fur trading continued here until themid-19th century when Southampton was founded.”By 1826, the Hudson’s Bay Company established an outpost at Saguingue
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to competewith independent fur traders like Piché. From La Cloche (established in 1821), its mainpost on Lake Huron, the Hudson’s Bay Company employed First Nations, Métis, French,and British fur traders who largely depended on Anishnabe hunters to supply deer, bearand marten skins. By 1832, the supply of premium furs was exhausted and the companyclosed its post. However., fur trading continued here until the mid-19th century whenSouthampton was founded.The earliest cartographic evidence of fur traders being active at the mouth of the SaugeenRiver is the 1822 map of Lake Huron by British surveyor Henry Wolsey Bayfield, whichnotes “Indian Traders” and buildings on the north side of “River Saugink” near the river’smouth. Alexander William McKay, the Metis son of colonel William McKay, was theclerk in charge at Saguingue post from 1827 to 1830. His wife was Angelique JolineauLeblanc from Wisconsin. Also resident there were Peter McFarlane,
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a Michif fromNippigon, and Michel Frechette a NWC Michif employee who arrived in 1828. HenrySayer, the Metis son of John Sayer worked at Whitefish Lake. He left the HBC becausehe was underpaid and in 1830-31 established at Saguingue under Dr. Mitchell.The Kenora Longe family, descended from NWC voyageur Joseph Lange (L'Ange)assigned to Lac Ouinipic (Winnipeg) in 1804, and who was dismissed by the company atthe NWC Nipigon post in 1821. This family eventually settled at Saugeen, Lake Huron,where Joseph Longe, father and son, were opposition traders near the HBC post of Saguingue and about Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. Voyageur Joseph Lange’s wife wasIsabelle Colin (Collin) born in the NW, their marriage was noted on the baptisms of threechildren at Drummond Island in 1825. According to family tradition, the Longe's wererelated to the Delormes of Kenora and Minnesota.Reference:
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Other fur-trading posts were established on Lake Huron to compete with independenttraders at Mississauge, Green Lake, Whitefish Lake, French River, Lake Nipissing,Sheshawinaga, Isle aux Sables and Saguingue - the name the Hudson’s Bay Companygave to its post at Saugeen (also spelled Sagingue), which is mentioned in records datingfrom 1826.
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Later changed his name to john Bell and became a member of Garden River First Nation.

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