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Landscaping and Horticulture for Lauren Schwartz’s Memorial Greenhouse

Landscaping and Horticulture for Lauren Schwartz’s Memorial Greenhouse

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Published by: calderdavid35 on Oct 03, 2011
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05/12/2014

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Interior & Exterior Landscaping and Horticulture forLauren Schwartz’s Memorial Greenhouse: Semester Report
Mike AronovIni LiKevin LukeEugene YaoJason EcksteinTeam Leader: Ini LiTeam Advisor: Emily PerssonSubmission Date: December 11, 2006
 
Mike Aronov, Ini Li, Kevin Luke, Eugene Yao, Jason EcksteinTeam 6: Interior & Exterior Landscaping and HorticultureAdvisor: Emily PerssonFinal Design ReportDecember 11, 2006-2-
Table of Contents
SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY....................................................................................3
 
SECTION 2: PROJECT DESCRIPTION...................................................................................4
 
D
ESCRIPTION OF
G
ATEWAY
C
OURSE AND
S
ERVICE
-L
EARNING
P
ROGRAM
..............................4
 
D
ESCRIPTION OF
T
EAM
S
O
RGANIZATION
...................................................................................4
 
D
ESCRIPTION OF
C
OMMUNITY
P
ARTNER 
.....................................................................................5
 
D
ESCRIPTION OF
P
RESENTED
P
ROBLEM
......................................................................................6
 
F
ORMAL
P
ROBLEM
S
TATEMENT
...................................................................................................7
 
N
ARRATIVE
D
ESCRIPTION OF
F
UNCTIONAL
EQUIREMENTS AND
C
ONSTRAINTS
....................8
 
D
ESCRIPTION OF
E
VOLUTION OF
D
ESIGN
....................................................................................9
 
D
EFINING THE
P
ROBLEM
..................................................................................................................9
 
F
ORMULATING
S
OLUTIONS
..............................................................................................................9
 
D
EVELOPING
M
ODELS
/P
ROTOTYPES
.............................................................................................10
 
I
MPLEMENTING
,
 
T
ESTING
,
 
M
ODIFYING
,
AND
P
RESENTING THE
F
INAL
D
ESIGN
............................10
 
SECTION 3: TRANSITION PLAN AND PROJECT DOCUMENTATION........................12
 
C
ONNECTION TO
P
RIOR 
W
ORK AND
E
XPANSION OF
S
OLUTION
...............................................12
 
D
OCUMENTATION FOR 
D
UPLICATION OF
P
ROCESS
...................................................................12
 
D
OCUMENTATION FOR 
U
SE AND
M
AINTENANCE OF
S
OLUTION
...............................................13
 
P
ICTURES
,
 
D
IAGRAMS
,
 
T
ECHNICAL
D
RAWINGS
,
ETC
................................................................14
 
SECTION 4: CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.............................................15
 
SECTION 5: APPENDICES.......................................................................................................16
 
A
PPENDIX
A:
 
P
RODUCT
D
ESIGN
S
PECIFICATIONS
.....................................................................16
 
A
PPENDIX
B:
 
G
ANTT
C
HART
.......................................................................................................20
 
A
PPENDIX
C:
 
T
ECHNICAL
S
PECIFICATIONS
(M
AYA
).................................................................21
 
A
PPENDIX
D
A
:
 
B
UDGET
I
NFORMATION AND
L
IST OF
M
ATERIALS
...........................................23
 
A
PPENDIX
D
B
:
 
A
LPHABETIZED
L
IST OF
A
LL
P
LANTS
...............................................................25
 
A
PPENDIX
D
C
:
 
P
LANT
D
ESCRIPTIONS FOR 
H
IGHLY
ECOMMENDED
P
LANTS
.......................26
 
A
PPENDIX
D
D
:
 
N
OTES ON
O
THER 
P
LANTS
.................................................................................30
 
A
PPENDIX
E:
 
P
HOTOGRAPHS
I
LLUSTRATING THE
T
EAM
E
XPERIENCE
...................................35
 
A
PPENDIX
F
A
:
 
I
DEAS FOR 
H
ORTICULTURE
A
CTIVITIES FOR 
S
TUDENTS
.................................36
 
A
PPENDIX
F
B
:
 
P
LANTING
D
ETAILS FOR 
S
OME
V
EGETABLES
...................................................39
 
A
PPENDIX
F
C
:
 
D
ETAILS FOR 
S
TARTING AN
A
VACADO
T
REE
....................................................40
 
A
PPENDIX
F
D
:
 
G
UIDELINES FOR 
C
ARE OF
P
LANTS
...................................................................42
 
A
PPENDIX
F
G
:
 
S
EASONAL
A
CTIVITIES
.......................................................................................53
 
A
PPENDIX
G:
 
EFERENCES
C
ONSULTED FOR 
P
ROJECT
............................................................54
 
A
PPENDIX
H:
 
C
OPY OF
P
OWER 
P
OINT
S
LIDES
............................................................................55
 
 
Mike Aronov, Ini Li, Kevin Luke, Eugene Yao, Jason EcksteinTeam 6: Interior & Exterior Landscaping and HorticultureAdvisor: Emily PerssonFinal Design ReportDecember 11, 2006-3-
Section 1: Executive Summary
As students in the Fu Foundation of Engineering and Applied Science at ColumbiaUniversity, we participate in service learning projects through the Gateway Lab course.Our team worked among seven other teams all devoted to different aspects of designing agreenhouse for the community partner PS79M, a public school for physically andmentally handicapped students in Harlem. The parents of Lauren Schwartz, a former student of PS79M, have provided funding to build the greenhouse that will commemoratetheir daughter and provide the students of the school with the same opportunities thatLauren enjoyed during her life. Unlike most of the other students at the school, Laurenhad regular therapy, both at the Rusk institute and at her own home; however, themajority of the parents of the PS79M students neither have the time nor the money to provide this for their children. In school, therapy is only available twice a week, which isadequate but nowhere near ideal. Our task, therefore, is to improve the students’ qualityof life within the school by creating an environment that provides therapy and builds prevocational skills that will be invaluable to the students upon graduation. Our group provides in this report computer models of plants, cost estimates, activities lists, and purchasing schedules. We have collaborated with the school’s therapists, the parents of Lauren Schwartz, members of the Rusk Institute, and the other teams to produce acomprehensive list of plants and activities that meets the physical, therapeutic, andeducational needs of every student and is easy to implement and maintain for the school.The greenhouse must be an active and usable educational and therapeutic environment,so we chose potted plants, which are robust in their ability to survive and the variety of activities that they provide. One main aspect of the design is our use of pots rather than plant beds to allow students to bring the plant of their choice to a central table to work onactivities in groups ranging from transplanting and pruning to drying leaves. That way,the greenhouse can also foster a social environment. The main varieties of potted plantswe have recommended are common houseplants and flowers that have attractive andvaried foliage, have health benefits such as filtering the air, and have the ability to thriveunder the care of the children and provide rewarding gardening experiences which aretherapeutic in their own right. Such plants include Begonias, Dracaenas, ChineseEvergreens, Norfolk Island pines, and Snapdragons. We will also provide a potted herbgarden with some vegetables for more varies activities involving sensory stimulation thatcater to students with more limited abilities to physically handle plants. For the aestheticsof the greenhouse, we recommend the use of hanging plants, which can also be used for hydroponic growth activities for students who cannot work with soil. Ficus trees can be placed in large pots on ground level to provide natural barriers to different areas of thegreenhouse. Such trees are easy to maintain and can be moved when necessary. Thisdesign is extremely realistic and can meet the needs of the students and the school while providing a model from which other schools attempting similar projects can draw.

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