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Mao - Let a Hundred Flowers Bloom1

Mao - Let a Hundred Flowers Bloom1

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Published by aberhane2001

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Published by: aberhane2001 on Oct 04, 2011
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07/11/2013

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;
HANDLINQ
OF
CONTRADICTIONSAMONQTHE
PEOPLE'
<
-\
By
MA0
TSE-TUNG
Chairman, Communist Party of China
WITHNOTES ANDAN INTRODUCTION
By
G.
F.
HUDSON
Director of
Far
Eastern Studies,
St.
Antony's College, Oxford
J
Leader
 
G.F."
'-
is Director of Far Eastern Studiesat St. Antony's College, Oxford and a frequent writer onAsia for the London
Economist.
From
1939
to 1946 he
served
in the British Foreign Office. He is the author of
Europe and China
and
An
Atlas
of
Far Eastern Politics,
and co-author with
M.
Rajchman of
The Far East inWorld Politics.
Since 1956, he
has
been
a monthly ana-lyst of world politics for
THE
EW
EADER,
nd he has alsocontributed to
Encounter, Twentieth Century
and otherleading British reviews. In June 1957, he presided atthe international conference of scholars
on
"Changes
in
Soviet Society" held at Oxford
under
the auspicesof the Congress for Cultural Freedom. He preparedthe notes to Mao's
speech
after examining theChinese text as well as the English translation.
This booklet is sponsored by the Tamintent Instituteas part of its educational and cultural activity.
 
-=
-
,(--
-i
rrwrn
uu
rrvr
By
G.
F.
Hudson
HE
SPEECH
"On the Correct Handling of Contradictions Among
the
T
eople? made by Mao Tse-tung to an enlarged session of the SupremeState Conference on February
27,
was not published until the end of June.In the meantime, however, its
main
contents had become known and variousrumors about its details, some of
them
highly
sensational, were widelycurrent. It seems likely that, although not regarded as a top-secret communi-cation-and in any case delivered to a fairly large audience-it was notoriginally intended for publication, but that the decision to publish
was
taken in order to correct undesirable unofficial versions of it. It was admittedthat for the published version Mao had made "certain additions''
to
theoriginal verbatim record, and there is nothing
in
the
public
text we nowhave to show which passages have
been
added. Even so, the text
we
nowhave can hardly
be
identical with the original speech, for if it is true,
as
was reported, that Mao took four hours
to
deliver
it,
a great deal must havebeen left out in the published version, which, inclusive of the additions, coddhave been
spoken
n not much more than half the time.With all
thw
reservations, however, the
speech
as
published remains
a
very important historical document, particularly in view of what
has
happened
in
China
since
last February. The speech
was
made
asthe
pre-liminary to the
cheng
feng
campaign for "rectification of the style of Partywork," which was launched officially throughout China on May
1.
Thiscampaign was supposed to be directed against the "three evils" of sectarian-ism, subjectivism and bureaucratism marring the conduct of Communistcadres in their relations with the people; it was primarily a movement forself-criticism within the Communist party, but it was announced that
in
order to help the Party in correcting its shortcomings criticism would
be
welcomed from
the
non-Party
public,
particularly the non-Communist, so-call "democratic" parties included as auxiliaries of the Communist partyin the Government coalition, and the critics were exhorted to speak frankly.There followed
a
flood of criticism (reported in the Chinese press), which
not
merely voiced grievances and complaints in matters of detail but calledin question
the
supremacy of the Communist party and
its
policies.At first there was no response from the Communist side; then, beginningwith an editorial in the Peking
Peopk's
Daily
on June
8,
a
furious campaignwas launched against 'LRightists," under which term all the critics of theParty were lumped together. A number of leading members of the auxiliaryparties, notably
the
Democratic
League
and
the Revolutionary Kuomintang
(the
group of Kuomintang dissidents who went over to the Communistsduring the civil war), became targets for violent denunciation, with hintsof "counter-revolutionary conspiracy" and threats
of
"punishment"
if
re-

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