Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Guidelines for Starting a Horticultural Therapy Program by Partnering with Volunteers; by Joel Flagler

Guidelines for Starting a Horticultural Therapy Program by Partnering with Volunteers; by Joel Flagler

Ratings: (0)|Views: 17|Likes:
Published by YosefMendelsohn

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: YosefMendelsohn on Oct 04, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/08/2014

pdf

text

original

 
For a comprehensive list of our publications visit 
www.rce.rutgers.edu
Bulletin
E311
Guidelines for Starting aHorticultural Therapy Program byPartnering with Volunteers
 Madeline Flahive DiNardo, MBA, County Agricultural Agent Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Union County Katherine Sabatino, Horticultural Therapist Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus, NJ; Rutgers Master Gardener, Union County Joel Flagler, HTR, County Agricultural Agent Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Bergen County
 
Table of Contents
The Art of Horticultural Therapy......................................................................1The Horticultural Therapy Profession..............................................................2Volunteers Promote Horticultural Therapy.......................................................2Goals of Horticultural Therapy Program..........................................................4Horticultural Goals for Participants..................................................................5Site Recruitment...............................................................................................6Scheduling the Horticultural Therapy Program................................................7Sample Recruitment Letter...............................................................................8Preparing a Budget for Volunteer Horticultural Therapy Program....................9Horticultural Therapy Project Supplies............................................................9Instructions for Horticultural Therapy Projects - Plant Projects.......................12-20Potting Annuals...........................................................................................12Forcing Paper White Narcissus Bulb..........................................................13Leaf Cuttings...............................................................................................15Houseplant Stem Cuttings...........................................................................16Dividing Houseplants..................................................................................17Terrarium.....................................................................................................18Kitchen Recyclables....................................................................................20Nature Crafts....................................................................................................21-29Everlasting Flower Arrangement..................................................................21Mini-Pumpkin..............................................................................................22Flower Fragments/Seed Ornaments............................................................23Fragrant Pomander......................................................................................27Sachets........................................................................................................29Decoupage Boxes.......................................................................................30Appendix..........................................................................................................31-35Houseplants for Leaf Cuttings....................................................................31Houseplants for Stem Cuttings...................................................................31Houseplants for Division.............................................................................31Houseplants for Terrariums.........................................................................32Vegetables for Rooting................................................................................32Flowers for Pressing...................................................................................32Flowers for Drying......................................................................................33Additional Resources..................................................................................34Works Consulted........................................................................................35
 
G
UIDELINES
 
FOR
S
TARTING
 
A
H
ORTICULTURAL
T
HERAPY
P
ROGRAM
 
BY
P
ARTNERING
 
WITH
V
OLUNTEERS
 Madeline Flahive DiNardo, MBA, County Agricultural Agent Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Union County Katherine Sabatino, Horticultural Therapist Bergen Regional Medical Center, Paramus, NJ; Rutgers Master Gardener, Union County Joel Flagler, HTR, County Agricultural Agent Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Bergen County
The Art of Horticultural Therapy
Horticultural Therapy (HT) is a process using plants and gardening activities to improve thebody, mind, and spirit of people. It is practiced throughout the world in: hospitals; rehabilitation,hospice, and vocational facilities; nursing homes; senior and community centers; schools; andprisons. HT is the use of nature to heal. It is not a new concept, as ancient Egyptian physiciansmade use of the therapeutic properties of gardens by prescribing walkthrough gardens. Expertscontinue to observe that most people receive satisfaction from watching a flower or vegetablegrow and develop. Plants do not discriminate and they are not judgmental regarding a person’sage or abilities. Plants respond to caregivers with rewards of new growth, flowers, or fruits. Thissuccess brings a sense of achievement and improves self-esteem. Today, the AmericanHorticultural Therapy Association (AHTA) defines HT as "the engagement of a client ingardening-related activities, facilitated by a trained therapist, to achieve specific treatmentgoals." AHTA believes that horticultural therapy is an active process, which occurs in the contextof an established treatment plan.
Benefits of Horticultural Therapy Programs
HT offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits. On a cognitive level, horticulturaltasks improve memory and attention to detail. Activities such as planting seeds develop skillssuch as sequencing or following directions. Planting dish gardens and arranging cut flowersallows for one to channel creative and artistic drives. The responsibility of caring for plants bringsabout social growth. Group HT sessions coordinated by horticultural therapists and volunteersfoster the development of friendships. The presence of plants and HT programming improvesthe quality of life for residents of hospices and other health care facilities, at any stage of life.This people-plant connection can facilitate physical benefits including muscle retention andimproved coordination, balance, and strength. Horticulture-related projects can improve finemotor skills and dexterity. The multitude of colors, shapes, textures, and fragrances of plantsused in HT creates a sensory experience that may calm or stimulate. Fragrance can triggerpleasant memories. Plant materials used in HT allow for maximum use of visual, tactile, gustatoryand olfactory senses. Bright, bold flower and foliage colors can sometimes be seen by thevisually-impaired. Handling potting soil or arranging dried flowers provides tactile experiences,
1

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->