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Knowledge for Action: Emerging experiences in child-focused Social and Economic Policy Volume 2

Knowledge for Action: Emerging experiences in child-focused Social and Economic Policy Volume 2

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UNICEF undertakes evidence-based analysis to build national commitment towards effective policies, laws and budgets that promote the rights and improve the lives of the most deprived children and women. This involves understanding the situation at country level by supporting and promoting child poverty studies, real time monitoring and the situation analysis of children's and women's rights. It opens the door for UNICEF’s participation in policy and budget debates on areas such as social protection and social budgeting that influence key policy decisions affecting the lives of disadvantaged children and their families. Recently, in response to the food, fuel and financial crisis, UNICEF’s work has focused on building the capacities of key national institutions and strengthening policies that prioritize not only the reduction of structural poverty, but also crisis-related vulnerabilities. It is widely understood that progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), both in aggregate and for the most vulnerable populations, will be at risk if the right policies are not in place.

In order to improve knowledge sharing around child-focused social and economic policy, UNICEF is investing in documenting and sharing country experiences in this area. To this end, the first compendium on child-focused social and economic policy was released in July 2011. It is available at http://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/Social_Policy_Compendium_e-version(2).pdf.

As follow-up to this publication, we have compiled an additional 18 recent innovations and lessons learned from UNICEF supported initiatives which are featured here. These cases are illustrative examples of some of our work on social and economic policy and highlight UNICEF’s and its partners’ experience in making policy work a core strategy for reaching the most deprived. The cases highlighted in this publication are highly diverse examples - from design and impact analysis of a cash transfer programme in Senegal to development of an equity-focused child-centred methodology for situation analysis in Iraq; making visible the impact of the economic crisis on children in Mexico; ex-ante analysis of the impact of a proposed tax change in Serbia; shaping a child sensitive National Social Protection Strategy in Cambodia; and to scaling up of the social protection system in Mozambique, among others.

Documentation of key lessons and experiences facilitates their further application and is valuable for organizational learning. It is important to recognize that lessons gained through cooperation in one country or context are not necessarily transferable to the circumstances of another. However, we hope that this compilation will be useful in two ways: first, to provide a sense of the range of UNICEF's work on social policy across regions; and second, to provide concrete examples of child-focused social and economic policy work that can inform and improve similar initiatives elsewhere.

Each of these pieces is a summary and more detailed information is available from the UNICEF Country Offices which provided the original material. If you are interested in learning more about a particular topic or featured innovation, or would like to make comments, please contact Policy and Practice in UNICEF Headquarters (lessonslearned@unicef.org or policyadvocacy@unicef.org).
UNICEF undertakes evidence-based analysis to build national commitment towards effective policies, laws and budgets that promote the rights and improve the lives of the most deprived children and women. This involves understanding the situation at country level by supporting and promoting child poverty studies, real time monitoring and the situation analysis of children's and women's rights. It opens the door for UNICEF’s participation in policy and budget debates on areas such as social protection and social budgeting that influence key policy decisions affecting the lives of disadvantaged children and their families. Recently, in response to the food, fuel and financial crisis, UNICEF’s work has focused on building the capacities of key national institutions and strengthening policies that prioritize not only the reduction of structural poverty, but also crisis-related vulnerabilities. It is widely understood that progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), both in aggregate and for the most vulnerable populations, will be at risk if the right policies are not in place.

In order to improve knowledge sharing around child-focused social and economic policy, UNICEF is investing in documenting and sharing country experiences in this area. To this end, the first compendium on child-focused social and economic policy was released in July 2011. It is available at http://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/Social_Policy_Compendium_e-version(2).pdf.

As follow-up to this publication, we have compiled an additional 18 recent innovations and lessons learned from UNICEF supported initiatives which are featured here. These cases are illustrative examples of some of our work on social and economic policy and highlight UNICEF’s and its partners’ experience in making policy work a core strategy for reaching the most deprived. The cases highlighted in this publication are highly diverse examples - from design and impact analysis of a cash transfer programme in Senegal to development of an equity-focused child-centred methodology for situation analysis in Iraq; making visible the impact of the economic crisis on children in Mexico; ex-ante analysis of the impact of a proposed tax change in Serbia; shaping a child sensitive National Social Protection Strategy in Cambodia; and to scaling up of the social protection system in Mozambique, among others.

Documentation of key lessons and experiences facilitates their further application and is valuable for organizational learning. It is important to recognize that lessons gained through cooperation in one country or context are not necessarily transferable to the circumstances of another. However, we hope that this compilation will be useful in two ways: first, to provide a sense of the range of UNICEF's work on social policy across regions; and second, to provide concrete examples of child-focused social and economic policy work that can inform and improve similar initiatives elsewhere.

Each of these pieces is a summary and more detailed information is available from the UNICEF Country Offices which provided the original material. If you are interested in learning more about a particular topic or featured innovation, or would like to make comments, please contact Policy and Practice in UNICEF Headquarters (lessonslearned@unicef.org or policyadvocacy@unicef.org).

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Published by: The United Nations Children's Fund on Oct 06, 2011
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1
 
POLICY AND PRACTICE
October 2011
Knowledge for ActionEmerging eperiencesin child-focusedSocial and Economic Policy
Selected Innovations and LessonsLearned from UNICEF programmes
Volume 2
 
PUBLICATION
Knowledge for Action: Emerging experiences in child-focused Social and Economic Policy Selected Innovations and Lessons Learned from UNICEF Programmes, Volume 2 
© United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), October 2011
Disclaimer 
This compilation is based on internal eld reports and is not edited or fact checked to ofcial UN publication standards.Statements in these articles do not imply or constitute ofcial opinions or policy positions of either the United Nations or UNICEF.
Acknowledgements
This compendium is a collaborative effort between UNICEF Country Ofces and the Policy, Advocacy and KnowledgeManagement Section (Division of Policy and Practice). It has been reviewed and compiled by Neha Karkara, IanThorpe and Xavier R Sire. Design support was provided by Upasana Young. We acknowledge the following contribu
-
tors and reviewers:
Original contributors
Sona Karapetyan, Cristina Roccella (Armenia); Selma Turkic (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Usha Mishra, Socheath Heng(Cambodia); Tinatin Baum (Georgia); Subhash Misra, Juan Santander (Iraq); Zoran Stojanov, Biljana Lubarovska (Theformer Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia); Erika Strand (Mexico); Serghei Buruiana (Moldova); Lisa Kurbiel (Mozam
-
bique); Yoshimi Nishino (Myanmar); Aleksandra Jovic (Serbia); Remy Pigois (Senegal); George Laryea-Adjei, NkechiObisie-Nmehielle (South Africa); Augustine Agu (Trinidad and Tobago); Bernard Kennedy (Turkey); Natalia Astapova(Ukraine); Solrun Engilbertsdottir (Global)
Reviewers
Richard Morgan, Isabel Ortiz, Jingqing Chai, David Anthony, Rinko Kinoshita, Jennifer Yablonski, Solrun Engilberts
-
dottir, Natalia Elena Windsor Rossi, Deolinda MartinsCover photo credits: (c) UNICEF/NYHQ2009-1842/Markisz, (c) UNICEF/NYHQ2011-1092/Holt, (c) UNICEF/NYHQ2010-1535/Asselin
For further information on Lessons Learned and Good Practices, please contact:
Policy, Advocacy and Knowledge Management SectionDivision of Policy and Practice
United Nations Children’s Fund
3 United Nations PlazaNew York, NY 10017, USAEmail:lessonslearned@unicef.org
 
www.unicef.org/evaluatio
n
/index_56532.htmlwww.unicef.org/socialpolic
y
2
 
Knowledge for ActionEmerging eperiences in child-focusedSocial and Economic PolicyVolume 2
 
FOREWORD
UNICEF undertakes evidence-based analysis to build national commitment towards effective policies, laws and budgets thatpromote the rights and improve the lives of the most deprived children and women. This involves understanding the situationat country level by supporting and promoting child poverty studies, real time monitoring and the situation analysis of children'sand women's rights. It opens the door for UNICEF’s participation in policy and budget debates on areas such as social protec
-
tion and social budgeting that inuence key policy decisions affecting the lives of disadvantaged children and their families.Recently, in response to the food, fuel and nancial crisis, UNICEF’s work has focused on building the capacities of key nationalinstitutions and strengthening policies that prioritize not only the reduction of structural poverty, but also crisis-related vulnerabili
-
ties. It is widely understood that progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), both in aggregate andfor the most vulnerable populations, will be at risk if the right policies are not in place.In order to improve knowledge sharing around child-focused social and economic policy, UNICEF is investing in docu
-
menting and sharing country experiences in this area. To this end, the rst compendium on child-focused social andeconomic policy was released in July 2011. It is available athttp://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/les/Social_Policy_ Compendium_e-version(2).pdf .As follow-up to this publication, we have compiled an additional 18 recent innovations and lessons learned from UNICEFsupported initiatives which are featured here. These cases are illustrative examples of some of our work on social andeconomic policy and highlight UNICEF’s and its partners’ experience in making policy work a core strategy for reachingthe most deprived. The cases highlighted in this publication are highly diverse examples - from design and impact analysis of a cash transfer programme in Senegal to development of an equity-focused child-centred methodology for situation analysisin Iraq; making visible the impact of the economic crisis on children in Mexico; ex-ante analysis of the impact of a proposed taxchange in Serbia; shaping a child sensitive National Social Protection Strategy in Cambodia; and to scaling up of the socialprotection system in Mozambique, among others.Documentation of key lessons and experiences facilitates their further application and is valuable for organizational learn
-
ing. It is important to recognize that lessons gained through cooperation in one country or context are not necessarilytransferable to the circumstances of another. However, we hope that this compilation will be useful in two ways: rst, toprovide a sense of the range of UNICEF's work on social policy across regions; and second, to provide concrete exam
-
ples of child-focused social and economic policy work that can inform and improve similar initiatives elsewhere.
 
Each of these pieces is a summary and more detailed information is available from the UNICEF Country Ofces whichprovided the original material. If you are interested in learning more about a particular topic or featured innovation, or would like to make comments, please contact Policy and Practice in UNICEF Headquarters (lessonslearned@unicef.org
 or 
policyadvocacy@unicef.org).Richard Morgan Isabel Ortiz
Director Associate Director Policy and PracticeUnited Nations Children’s Fund
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