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Civil War Recollections of Thomas J. Doughman

Civil War Recollections of Thomas J. Doughman

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Published by William Higgins
This a transcription of the Civil War recollections of Thomas J. Doughman. Co. G 89th O. V. I. Goshen Clermont County Ohio
This a transcription of the Civil War recollections of Thomas J. Doughman. Co. G 89th O. V. I. Goshen Clermont County Ohio

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: William Higgins on Oct 10, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/10/2011

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I
CIVIL
WAR
RECOLLECTT
Or
JS
OF
TTTOi
TAH
J.
DOT
101
il'AM
OHIO
H'.'tTVOLlfN'l'"";!
a
"IN "'A
ijw,''
Volunteers
mustered
in
August
22,
1862,
at Camp
Dennison, Ohio,
I was 17
years old. Uniformed thereand issued Austrian
rifles
-
cots
soft
-
rnuv.'zloloader
cap
lock.
After
a few
days
at
Dennison,
v/ent
to
Covington, Ky. ,
and
guarded
I'enn.
R.
It.
Kirby
Smith
was
then threatening
Cincinnati.
Then
back
to the
Ohio
side,
the
regiment gua.r<lod
the
Penn.
R. R.
from
Milford,
0. to
Pendleton
for
a
week
or
30
and
then recrossed
the
river
to
Covington,then orossed
the
Licking
River
on
oontoon
bridge
-
breast
works
- Camp
Slick
(oould
bo
Slide,
Click,
Glich,
etc.)
on
side
hill.
A
week
in Covington
-Camp
King, then
back
to
the
Ohio
side
of
the
river
to
C
incinnati.
(sic)
At Front St. took
box
cars
to
levee, the^the
d
8c
0
to
Hamden,
Ohio, near
Chillicothe
whore
we
were
trans
ferred
to
coal oars
and
sent
to
Jackson,
0.
"'e
went
into
camp
a few
days
at
Jackson,
then
marched
to
Gallinolis,
0.
Here
we
turned over
our
old
flint
locks -Austrian
arms-
and
received
Marker's
Ferry
muskets
with
nercussion
locks
attached.
Took
this
rusty
gun I
couldn't
3hoot
to
a
rilacksmith
shop,
tie
took
out
stuck oin
and out
in
new.
From
there
we
crossed
the
Ohio
River
at
Point Pleasant
in
West
Virginia,
and
marched
uo
:
the
Aanawha
liver
valley
to
the
mouth
of
the
Gaulcy
River,
where
itenters the
Kanawha.
Canrood
here
a
week
or two.
Then
moved
to
Colton (sic. could
be
Charlton)
Mountain
with
no
tents
or
provisions. Five'days
rations
be
fore
starting
foraging.
Six mi
1%"march.
We
snent
a
few
weeks
here
with
the
use of
cLoth
tents.
ttuilt
winter
quarters here
- Camp
Penwick
-
ordered
out
'
after
Christmas.
We
then
moved
on to
Fayetteville,
IV.
Vs.,
for
a few
days
to
guard
erection
of
telegraoh wires.
Then
re
turned
to^olton,
cut
logs
for.'winter
quarters
^nd
remained
10
days,
nardtack
-
uickled
nork
-
beans
-
ooffee,
mainstays.
We
were
then ordered
down
the
Kanawha
River
to
Cannelton
(sic.)
where
we
proceeded
to
finish
the
winter
quarters others
had
begun.Crude
log
structureswith
roof
on but no
chinking
or
daubing
or any
chim
neys
built.
 
- 2 -
Two
weeks
at
Camr>
Cannelton and we
marched
down
the
Kanawha
to
entrance of
Ohio
river
near
i
J
oint
Pleasant.
There
we
boarded
the "D. C. Levi"
steamboat
which wasa small boat, hardly big
enough
for a regiment. Men
crowded
like
sardines or
hogs
in a
cattle
car. Slent
outside
the cabin and was covered
with
snow.
The boat
steamed
down
the
Ohio
and
anchored
at
Cincinnati.
Anchored
in the middle of the
river lest
we
should take
a
French
leave, and go
home.
Then
we
steamed
down
the
Ohio
River to smithland
,
&y.
where
the
Cumberland
Hiver
meets.
And from there up
the
Cumberland
to Portland.
Camped
at Portland a few
day3
and turned in our old
rifles
and
drew
Springfield
Rifles.
The now
arms
were
splendid
rifles
-
wished
1 had
mine
still.
We
boarded
the
boat to
steam
for Nashville. Arrived
at
Jf
'ort
Donaldson
(sic.)
(Donnelson)
just
in time to
save
the 83rd
Illinois
who
were
guarding the
fort.
Theywere
under
attack by Forrest's Brigade.
Union
gun
boat
arrived
in time to aid
shelling
Forrest's
infantry,
the
83rd was
inside
the breastworks.
Camped
on the
opposite side of the
river
that night.
Crossed
the
river
to
fort
next a.m.
Were
the
first
to
witness the results of
engagements,
bury
dead,
etc.
We
left
the
same
day by boat for
Carthage,
Tennessee,
and
went
into
camp
there
with
the 11th
Ohio,
36th
Ohio,
92nd
Ohio,
18th
Kentucky,
and
John
M.
Miller
still
commanded
the
89th
Ohio
until
wounded,
lie had
been
in
command
since
Camp
Dennison.
Scouting was our
principle
duty.
These
regiments
made
up
General
George
Cook's
brigade,
(sic.
oould
be
Daniel
McCook's)(Gen.
Geo.
Crook?)
Sinoe
they
had no
cavalry attached to us we had to do
our own so
outing.
Morgan
's
(John
Hunt
Morgan)
and
Wheeler's
(Joseph
Wheeler)
cavalry
were
very
trouble
some
to us.
Often,
just
after
taps, they
would
come
down
the
opposite side
of
the
river
with
a piece
of
artillery
and
shell
our
camn.
Then
we
would
have
to
chase
them
- they had the
advantage
of us, b6ing
mounted
-
we had
no
chance
to catch
them.
Onoe
the
89th
and
11th
Ohio
went
out to scout toMiddletown,
Tonn.,
7 miles from
Carthage,
when
we
dis
covered
Morgan
's
pickets.
The Colonel halted bothregiments
and
ordered
a
company
of the 11th
Ohio
and
Company
G, my
oorapany,
to
deploy
as
skirmishers.
 
We
Advanced
to a
hill
to the
rear
of
town
and
opened
an
engagement
with
Morgan
's
mon. The
Colonel seeing
opposition
too
great, ordered skirmishers
of the 11th
Ohio
Infantry
to
fall
back
with
command. And
orderedboth regiments
to
fall
back.
This
loft
our
company
to
hold
the
line.
As wo came down
off
the
skirmish
line
about
the
pike
at the
foot
of the
hill,
some of
Morgan's
mon
came
dashing
around
mounted,
and
came
near
cutting
us
off from
our command. Wo
were
compel
led
to
leave
the
pike
and
take
to the
hills
and
woods
to
avoid
their
fire.
We had one man
wounded,
but
succeeded
in
reaching
the
regiment.
First
Tire.
Struck
Cumberland
River
about
nightfall
-
above
Carthage
-
camping
here.
The
following
morning
on
wakening
discovered
squad
of
artillery
had come to
reinforce
us but
returned
to
Carthagemarching,
and
orossod
the
river
in
boats
and
went
back
in to our
old
camp.
Soon
after that,
Colonel
(one
account
said
General)Stokes
of
the
5th
(one
account
said 3rd)
TennesseeMounted
Infantry
regiment
was
attached
to our
brigadedoing
all
scouting duty
after.
Since
a
nortion
of
his
men had
lived
there with
some of
Morgan's
and
Wheeler's
men,
they
were
familiar
with
their
hidingplaoes.
Stokesnever
took
any
prisioners
-
hangedthem
as he
captured
them
-
they
soon
left
the
country.
June
1st
broke
camp at
Carthage
-
tents
-
marched
to
Murfreesboro
which
was
really
the
beginning
of the
Tullahoraa
oampaign
(was
actually
swelled
Talahoma)
Joe
Smith here
suspisioned
as spy
lived
just
oppositethe
Cumberland
River,
had
visited
camp
a
number
of
times.
Few
men
sent across
in -
Morgan's
dinge
-
aooompanied
by
guard
in
uniform
giving
complete
infor
mation
to
supposed
Morgan men. A
spy was
arrested
and
sent
to
Carthage
and
Jailed
-
Court martialed
and
found
guilty
-
erected
scaffold
and
troops
forming
a
square
and
some
were
sitting
on box in
which
he
was
to
be
buried,
(this
paragraph
sic.
unclear)The
first
day's march
after
being
in
Murfreesboro
we came
upon
a
foroe
of
rebels
at
Hoover's
gap, 13
milesfrom Murfreesboro.
There
they brought
on an
engagement.
Man
wounded.
Ordered
to
support
Loonis
--?
.
Rcbs
held
gap
controlling
the
road for
mile
until
infantry
came up
and
drove
them
from
gap. Our
regiment
remained
with
Loomis
and
came up his
battery occupying
gap.
Supply
line
in
rear
of
89th.
Rebels
moved
back
to
side

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