Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Security and the Speed of Change

Security and the Speed of Change

Ratings: (0)|Views: 227|Likes:
Published by BT Let's Talk
In 2008, sports car maker Ferrari hit a new record in Asia. That year, despite the gloom of the global recession, Ferrari sold 20% more cars in China than before the crisis. Even as the financial turmoil deepened, local sales held steady, before it surged 50% last year.In a blink of an eye, China has moved up the high-class auto race, becoming Ferrari’s biggest market, second only to the US.

Today, for every 10 Ferraris sold worldwide, three go to China. Around China, this astounding growth in the luxury sector is only eclipsed by even more massive rise in demand in the mainstream market, as break-neck business expansion spreads across all industries.

To read more about the emerging markets of Asia read our blog - http://www.blog.bt.com/viewpoint/index.php/2012/02/13/dragon/
In 2008, sports car maker Ferrari hit a new record in Asia. That year, despite the gloom of the global recession, Ferrari sold 20% more cars in China than before the crisis. Even as the financial turmoil deepened, local sales held steady, before it surged 50% last year.In a blink of an eye, China has moved up the high-class auto race, becoming Ferrari’s biggest market, second only to the US.

Today, for every 10 Ferraris sold worldwide, three go to China. Around China, this astounding growth in the luxury sector is only eclipsed by even more massive rise in demand in the mainstream market, as break-neck business expansion spreads across all industries.

To read more about the emerging markets of Asia read our blog - http://www.blog.bt.com/viewpoint/index.php/2012/02/13/dragon/

More info:

Published by: BT Let's Talk on Oct 11, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/24/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 Working and Winning Togetherwith Local Partnerships Security and the Speed of Change Balancing Growth and Impact
Helping yourorganisationgrow in China
3 whitepapers to help you understandthe challenges you may face
 
BT China Thought Leadership
4
Helping your organisation grow in China
Security and theSpeed of Change
In 2008, sports car maker Ferrari hit a new record in Asia. That year, despite the gloom of the global recession, Ferrari sold 20% more cars in China than before the crisis. Even as thenancial turmoil deepened, local sales held steady, before it surged 50% last year.In a blink of an eye, China has moved up the high-class auto race, becoming Ferrari’sbiggest market, second only to the US. Today, for every 10 Ferraris sold worldwide, threego to China.Around China, this astounding growth in the luxury sector is only eclipsed by even moremassive rise in demand in the mainstream market, as break-neck business expansion spreadsacross all industries.China’s growth momentum seemed unstoppable indeed. According to the InternationalMonetary Fund (IMF), when global GDP dropped less than one percent during that time,China’s GDP grew by 9.2%, which was just shy below its pre-crisis 9.7% GDP.As a result, China not only boosted Asia’s continued robust growth as a region, but also playeda critical role in the overall global economic recovery. Even with the threat of yet anotherglobal crisis, with the US and Europe debt issues, China looked set for long-term growth withannual GDP to stay around 9%.Today, more than 30% of the Forbes 500 companies are headquartered in Asia, and a few areeven moving their global headquarters into the region, particularly in China.
How multinationals can grow
their business safely in Asia
When globalGDP dropped
less than onepercent duringthat time,
China’s GDPgrew by 9.2%
 
BT China Thought Leadership
5
In a customer survey conducted by BT in 2009, more than 80% of its largest customers byrevenue said they plan to expand in Asia, particularly in front ofce, distribution and sales,as well as back ofce and production, and R&D.While Greater China and India were the overwhelming top choices, many global companiessaid they also plan to invest more across the region, particularly in Singapore, South Korea,Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Australia and Malaysia.As a result of this dynamic shift, the decisions of multinationals are also being fundamentallyre-shaped. Today, many of the regional CIOs, especially from Asia, are becoming increasinglyautonomous and inuential. Their role in the organisation has also become even more criticalas companies rely heavily on technology and network infrastructure to support growth.This is why many CIOs are focusing on ensuring their business grows safely into the future inChina and across Asia. This is by no means an easy task. This August, there was explosive newsabout an alleged ve-year long campaign of cyber attacks on governments, organisationsand businesses.While no one was identied as key perpetrator, speculations pointed to China, which has longbeen linked to news about hacking and other security breaches, including the recent attackson Google emails within and outside China as well as foreign governments.China has always denied links to cyber attacks, saying the country itself has suffered fromattacks and has taken increased security measures. This is partly why there has been closescrutiny of public data, which other sectors have decried as censorship - although corporatedata remains mostly private.Around the world, the fact remains that security threats are escalating. According to Gartner’sTop IT Predictions for 2011-2015 report, there is likely to be “a multi-nodal online attack,targeting multi-systems for maximum impact, for example nancial systems, physicaloperations and mobile communications that will disrupt and damage a G20 nation’s criticalinfrastructure by 2015.”Furthermore, a report by CIO Insight in May, outlined the top security concerns of 2011,which include viruses and spyware, email-borne threats, spam, social threats, smartphoneconnectivity, phishing, dangerous browsing, employee trustworthiness, apps proliferation andthe rise of tablet computing.In addition to these issues, multinationals face unique security challenges, particularly inChina. Today, for example, there are still regulatory issues controlling the import of securitysolutions into China, which means world-class solutions are not always readily available.
With big growth often comes bigger risks
More than 80%
of its largest
customers byrevenue said
they plan toexpand in AsiaAccording to
Gartner’s Top
IT Predictions
for 2011-2015
report, there
is likely to be“a multi-nodal
online attack thatwill disrupt and
damage a G20nation’s critical
infrastructure
by 2015.”

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->