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Business Planning for Nonprofits_ What It is and Why It Matters

Business Planning for Nonprofits_ What It is and Why It Matters

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Published by IllinoisLAN

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Published by: IllinoisLAN on Oct 12, 2011
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10/12/2011

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 ©2006 The Bridgespan Group, Inc. Bridgespan is a registered trademark of The Bridgespan Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
FEBRUARY 2006
Business Planning for Nonprofits
What it is and why it matters
 
Kelly Campbell Betsy Haley
 
 
2
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
3
GAINING STRATEGIC CLARITY
5
 DETERMINING STRATEGIC PRIORITIES
8
 
 Modify existing programs
 
 Add new programs or services Discontinue programs or services Increase the number of service recipients
UNDERSTANDING RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS
13
 Human resource investments Infrastructure investmentsFinancial implications
STAYING ON TRACK
18
Program milestonesOperational and financial milestones
GETTING STARTED
22
CLOSING THOUGHTS
24
APPENDIX: THE VALUE OF THE WRITTEN BUSINESS PLAN
25
What does a business plan look like?Uses for the business plan
 
 
3
Introduction
Mention business planning and people often think about written plans
thetangible products. The leap is natural, but it is also problematic. It short circuits theprocess of developing the plan, which is where many nonprofits find the greatervalue.
1
 The business-planning process offers a nonprofit’s decision makers a rareopportunity to step back and look at their organization as a whole. It is a time toconnect the dots between mission and programs, to specify the resources that willbe required to deliver those programs, and to establish performance measures thatallow everyone to understand whether the desired results are being achieved. As aresult, it encourages strategic thinking, not only while the plan is being created, butalso thereafter, as implementation leads to new challenges and the need to makenew decisions and tradeoffs.To illustrate, consider the experience of MY TURN, Inc. (aMerica’s Youth TeenageUnemployment Reduction Network), a Brockton, Massachusetts-based nonprofitacclaimed for its work with at-risk youth in small, urban communities. In 2003, theEdna McConnell Clark Foundation approached MY TURN about expanding thereach of its proven programs. Over a six-month period, MY TURN’s managementteam engaged with the Bridgespan Group in a rigorous business-planning process.They established a sharper definition of the population they wanted to serve,identified aspects of the program model they needed to supplement, and prioritizeda list of potential expansion sites. They also developed firm estimates of how muchthe new initiatives were going to cost and laid out a detailed timeline for getting thework done.
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We use the term “business planning” to refer to the process of developing a comprehensivedocument that sets forth what an organization is working to accomplish and how it intends tosucceed. Others use the term “strategic planning” to encompass the same set of activities.

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