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vol43_no09

vol43_no09

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Published by Cornelius Breed
Impact Magazine published in 2009
Impact Magazine published in 2009

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Published by: Cornelius Breed on Oct 14, 2011
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Php 70.
00
Vol. 43 No. 9 • SEPTEMBER 2009
 
IMPACT
• September 2009
2
 
 
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Impact is ofcially approved as general reference material for students in the Secondary and Ter 
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tiary levels and a general professional reading material for teachers in all levels on June 8, 1987.
Address e-mail subscription inquiries to: subscription@impactmagazine.net
ISSN 0300-4155
Asian Magazine for Human Transformation
 
Through Education, Social Advocacy and Evangelization
P.O. Box 2481, 1099 Manila, Philippines
©
Copyright 1974 by Social Impact Foundation, Inc.
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 Published monthly by
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IMPACT
Quote in the Act
“It’s Asia that’s lifting the world, rather than theU.S., and that’s never happened before.” 
Neal Soss,
chief economist for Credit Suisse in New York; believes that whileAmerican economy is still more than 3 times the size of China, it would come to
rival and eventually surpass the US in global economic inuence.
“The Taliban insurgency has gotten better, moresophisticated, in their tactics.” 
Mike Mullen,
an Admiral Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff; describedthe worsening situation in Afghanistan despite the recent addition of 17,000US troops ordered by the Obama administration and the extra security efforts
surrounding the presidential election that has been beset by complaints of fraud.
“I have 106 students in my class and 90 seats.” 
Rico Encinares,
Chemistry teacher; narrating to New York Times the woes of 
Philippine education caused by a government that allocates only 2.19% of the
annual budget despite a constitutional mandate to make education a priority and
an endemic corruption inherent among government ofcials.
“What is frightening is that a priest, these religiousleaders, if they become president, might confusespiritual from temporal things.” 
Leonardo Medroso,
Bishop of Tagbilaran in the Philippines; on the recent newsthat a priest and two lay religious leaders will be vying for the presidency by
2010 elections.
“It would be foolish of us to recount your achievement as we cannot even measure theenormity of your legacy.” 
Park Young-sook,
one of Kim’s close associates; during the memorial address
where tens of thousands of citizens, politicians, government ofcials and foreigndignitaries gathered at the National Assembly August 23 to pay nal tribute tolate former Korean president Kim Dae-jung.
“She made me proud again, to be Filipino.” 
Catalino Arevalo,
a Jesuit priest; in his homily at the funeral mass for formerPresident Corazon Aquino, August 5, where the funeral procession lasted for
many hours snaking along mourners counting about three hundred thousand.
   C   O   V   E   R   P   H   O   T   O    ©   P   E   D   R   O    Q   U   I   T   O   R   I   O ,   I   I   I   /   C   B   C   P   M   E   D   I   A
 
Volume 43 • Number 9
3
I
MPAC
T
 
September 2009 / Vol 43 • No 9
EDITORIAL
Dysfunctional politics ....................................... 27
COVER STORY
San Miguel Corporation: A Brewing Storm .. 16
ARTICLES
The Socio-Economic Spohisms of RH bill5043 ..................................................................... 4A Presence that Challenges and Strengthens .. 8Decline of traditional media ............................ 13
DEPARTMENTS
Quote in the Act ................................................. 2
News Features ................................................... 14
Statements .......................................................... 22
From the Blogs ................................................... 26From the Inbox .................................................. 28
Book Reviews ..................................................... 29Entertainment .................................................... 30
Asia Briefng ........................................................31
CONTENTS
S
capegoats the likes of “it’s acommunist propaganda” or“it’s politically motivated”or, the more recent, “it’s a mediahype” are too hackneyed to meritcredence, or even just a whimperof attention. They used to sellgood during the heyday of Marcos,because during the time of MartialLaw there was no way to check the
veracity of things except to groan
for thy-kingdom-come.But today with the democratiza-tion of all sorts of communication,there is simply no way to slip thetruth under the rug. Shortly afterGloria Arroyo and her band left SirioMaccioni’s Le Cirque at 58th Streetin Manhattan, the details of whather group gorged in the menu worthTwenty Thousand Dollars werealready circulated in the rooftopsof blogs, twits, facebook, and othersocial networking online communi-ties coming in droves of millions.
It was a tsunami of comments and
curses from ordinary people whoare neither politicians nor com-munists. And this, not to mention
the mainstream media mix of print
and broadcast which dedicatedhours and hours of primetime onthe subject.Which was why when Mala-cañang apologists—dominatedmostly by Remonde and Macalin-tal—came to fore in order to spin awin, they looked beleaguered andargued non sequiturs which only got
worse when, as habitually expected,they pointed ngers to the media,
the communists and the political op-position. Gee, it was like justifyingthe problem of evil.A huge amount of mon-ey wasted on corruption orlavish government spend-ing seriously means mil-lions of children deprived ofclassrooms and eventuallyeducation; millions of sickpeople denied of their medi-cine and health; millions of poor peopledivested of needed social services andopportunity to earn decent living; mil-lions of parents leaving their families to
get fragmented behind just to nd work
abroad—and so on and on.These consequences are pretty heavy.
From an economic point of view, the
degeneration of a country to penurynot purely by global economic funda-mentals (because neighboring countries
are continually ourishing despite the
economic slump of the United States)but largely by the inutility—some call itgreed for power and gold—of its leadersis a calculated insolvency in the fashionof Enron or the Lehman Brothers, albeitunbelievably. But here the victims of
the nancial heist are not the investors
but the citizens themselves, the countryitself. At the end of the day the questionnags, but how can leaders victimize theirvery own people?
While the destruction of a coun-try’s economy is a national misfortuneenough, it still does pale in comparison tothe disarray of culture and cultural val-
ues. This generation of Filipinos, are still
home to the practice of an elder brotheror sister working hard and never getting
married until all siblings have nished
schooling. Or of parents who never buynew clothes for the sake of the childrenthat need new ones. Or of a man who isabout to bite his food, but gives it insteadto a poor kid looking nearby.
And more values distinctively
Filipino that sums up to subjugating
one’s needs for sake of the other. Oflate, this may have been the reasonwhy, among others, the Philippinessaw hundreds of thousands ofmourners through many hours offuneral march because people sawin Cory Aquino the homestretch of
a vanishing cultural value. In Ninoy
and Cory Aquino the value of givingmore prominence to the country’sneeds more than the wants of theirown children, to the common goodmore than the good of their own
selves have become personied.Today, all these inherent Fili
-pino values are disappearing tosmithereens with the current politi-
cal leaders. Insensitivity is mild.
The tagalog “garapal” is more. But just the same, today’s breed of lead-ers is a bunch of whatchamacallitwho never gives a hoot to the verypeople who gave them the hoot in
the rst place.
This issue opens with Tony
Roxas disclosing the socio-econom
-ic sophisms of the Reproductive
Health Bill 5043. In our cover story,
our staff writer Charles Avila writesabout one of the irregularities ofMartial Law, the coco levy, whichuntil now is still breeding more andmore irregularities. Read on.

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