Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Safe Driving Game Proposal

Safe Driving Game Proposal

Ratings: (0)|Views: 61|Likes:
Published by Steven Entezari
In 2008 there were over ten million traffic accidents that resulted in fatalities (United States Census Bureau, 2011). Fear-based PSA commercials as well as other passive safe driving campaigns have proven themselves ineffective in behavior modification for their target audiences (Tay & Ozanne, 2002). Drivers need immediate and custom motivators to modify driving behaviors.
In 2008 there were over ten million traffic accidents that resulted in fatalities (United States Census Bureau, 2011). Fear-based PSA commercials as well as other passive safe driving campaigns have proven themselves ineffective in behavior modification for their target audiences (Tay & Ozanne, 2002). Drivers need immediate and custom motivators to modify driving behaviors.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Steven Entezari on Oct 15, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/15/2011

pdf

text

original

 
Steven Entezari
Safe Driving Game Proposal
September 27, 2011In 2008 there were over ten million traffic accidents that resulted in fatalities(United States Census Bureau, 2011). Fear-based PSA commercials as well as otherpassive safe driving campaigns have proven themselves ineffective in behaviormodification for their target audiences (Tay & Ozanne, 2002). Drivers needimmediate and custom motivators to modify driving behaviors.Passive approaches to inform the public of safe driving practices such as slogans andpersuasive messages have been initiated by the government (Levy, Compton, &Dienstfry, 2004) and industry (Kohli, Leuthesser, & Surl, 2007). These tactics focuson a large group and are never tailored to an individual. Simply raising the drivers
awareness of their speed, by way of a “Your Speed Is –“ sign has been shown toreduce drivers’ speeds as well
(van Houten, Paul, & Marini, An analysis of publicposting in reducing speeding behavior on an urban highway, 1980). However, it was
later shown that this feedback alone would do little to change the driver’s behavior
in the long run (van Houten & Nau, FEEDBACK INTERVENTIONS AND DRIVINGSPEED: A PARAMETRIC AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS , 1983).Motivational strategies such as behavior-modifying games have been used in thehealth sector for some time now (Baranowski, Buday, Thompson, & Baranowski,2008). The sense of playing a game gives individuals a reason to monitor theirbehaviors, a chance to be reinforced for a desired behavior, and to be made aware of incorrect or unacceptable behavior.The long term goal of this research is to explore the benefits of a real-time game that is played simply by collecting statistics from the driving patterns and behaviors of the player. Feedback about the players driving habits, social ranking for acompetitive edge, and positive reinforcement from partners in industry are allfactors that will motivate safe-driving beliefs within the individual.To address the missing sense of active engagement in corrective behavior by thedriver we will establish an
in-situ game to encourage safe driving
that will act asa motivational component for the player to drive safely, as well as a reminder of their behaviors within the context of their situation. There are two main aims:
 Aim 1: Challenge the player to drive safely.
Constant reminders and socialcomparisons will give the user a sense of their habits when compared with that of 
their peers and a “safe standard”. The
driver does better in the game by driving saferand displaying safer behaviors, as collected by an in-vehicle monitor.
 Aim 2: Reinforce safe driving practices.
Being a game, users are not onlychallenged to drive safely but also reinforced when they do. Partnerships withbusinesses who emphasize safe driving will allow top-ranked users to receivepositive reinforcements, such as discounts on insurance or
safest driver in thearea
prizes, similar to Foursquare
s mayorship benefits.Applying motivation from games and social feedback as well as reinforcement theories into driving practices in an ubiquitous manner will
increase the driver’s
awareness of how safely they drive and establish person-centered, motivating factorfor the driver to change any unsafe driving practices.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->