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Charged Particle Measurement

Charged Particle Measurement

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02/19/2015

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J. C. Armitage, et. al.. "Charged Particle Measurement."
Copyright 2000 CRC Press LLC. <http://www.engnetbase.com>.
\u00a9 1999 by CRC Press LLC
Charged Particle
Measurem ent
67.1 Introduction
Interaction of Charged Particles with Matter \u2022 Technologies
67.2 Nuclear Emulsions
67.3 Gas-Filled Charged Particle Counters
Gas-Filled Proportional Counters \u2022 Geiger-M\u00fcller Counters \u2022
Proportional Counter and Geiger-M\u00fcller Counter
Applications
67.4 Scintillation Counters
Introduction \u2022 Scintillation Counters: A Detailed
Description \u2022 Operating Information \u2022 Advanced Techniques \u2022
List of Manufacturers
67.5 Solid-State Detectors

Signal Generation \u2022 Categories of Detector \u2022 Plasma Effects and Pulse Height Defect \u2022 New Structures \u2022 Manufacturers and Prices

67.1 Introduction
Interaction of Charged Particles with Matter

There are a number of subatomic charged particles that can be detected by their interaction with matter. These include protons (hydrogen nuclei),b particles (fast electrons),a particles (helium nuclei), light ions, heavy ions, and \ufb01ssion fragments. Some of these particles are emitted by natural radioactivity on Earth or originate from space and reach the Earth in the form of cosmic rays; others are due to human activities (nuclear industry, accelerators). The kinetic energy of charged particles is given in units of electron-volts (eV), where 1 eV = 1.6\u00b4 10\u201319 J. Naturally occurringa andb particles from radioactive decay have energies up to 10 MeV. Ions, such as Cl+ , are accelerated to 35 MeV and higher in beam analysis procedures. Energetic particles that originate from space can have energies up to 1012GeV. Charged particles traversing matter lose kinetic energy until they eventually come to a halt. In the case of electrons, protons,aparticles, or light ions, most of this energy is lost through interactions with the electrons of the target. Heavier ions also lose a signi\ufb01cant amount of kinetic energy through direct collisions with the nuclei of the constituent atoms. However, for all types of charged particles of concern here, ionization of the target atoms is the dominant mode of excitation of the detection medium. This process is also the main source of radiation damage in biological tissue.

Energy Loss of Protons and Ions
The quantity of energy deposited by an incident energetic charged particle in a detection medium is a
function of the atomic mass,Am ed, the atomic number, Zm ed, and the density of target atoms that it meets
John C. Armitage
Ottawa\u2013Carleton Institute for
Physics, Carleton University
Madhu S. Dixit
Centre for Research in Particle
Physics, Carleton University
Jacques Dubeau
Centre for Research in Particle
Physics, Carleton University
Hans Mes
Centre for Research in Particle
Physics, Carleton University
F. Gerald Oakham
Centre for Research in Particle
Physics, Carleton University
\u00a9 1999 by CRC Press LLC

along its path. Hence, the unit of dimension used in this \ufb01eld is the mass thickness, and it is measured most often in units of g cm\u20132. This is equal to the geometric thickness or path lengthx , multiplied by the density of the detector volume,r. It follows that the rate of energy loss of a particle in the detection volume is dE/(r d x ) and it is given in units of keV (g cm\u20132)\u20131 or MeV (g cm\u20132)\u20131. The energy loss due to ionization is characterized by the Bethe-Bloch equation:

(67.1)

withD = 0.307 MeV/(g cm\u20132),c is the velocity of light (3.0\u00b4 108 m s\u20131) . The incident ion is described by zan d v, its charge and velocity, respectively. The atoms of the target are further de\ufb01ned by Im ed (~ 16Z0.9

med eV), their mean ionization energy. The energy loss is characterized by a peak at low energy

and a minimum at higher energies where a particle ofz= 1 is referred to as a minimum ionizing particle (MIP). The energy loss curves of protons in Si, Ar, and Au are shown onFigure 67.1. The energy loss expressed in MeV (g cm\u20132) \u20131 is lower for higherZm ed materials, where the ratioZm ed /Am ed becomes less than 0.5 andImed is large. However, when multiplied by the material\u2019s density, the energy loss in MeV cm\u20131 shows a reverse trend; it is greater for highZm ed materials because they have a high density. The rate of energy loss varies to the second power of the chargezof the incident ion and as the inverse square of its

FIGURE 67.1The electronic energy loss curves for protons in three different absorber elements are shown as a
function of kinetic energy. The target element with the lowerZm ed displays the highest stopping power due to its low
average ionizing potential. These curves were obtained using the SRIM computer program. (Reference 2.)
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