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Production Management Module for OpenERP (DRAFT v83)

Production Management Module for OpenERP (DRAFT v83)

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Published by Bernd Felsche
Production Management Module for OpenERP

Page 1 of 9

D D R D R A R A F A F T FT T
Abstract
Standard OpenERP MRP module has a naive view of manufacturing processes. One that is inadequate for all but the simplest production planning and management. The modular, object-oriented model of OpenERP is amenable to enhancement by provision of a sufficiently-capable package of modules. A Production Management Module has to fill real world needs, not only for the planning of manufacturing, but also to p
Production Management Module for OpenERP

Page 1 of 9

D D R D R A R A F A F T FT T
Abstract
Standard OpenERP MRP module has a naive view of manufacturing processes. One that is inadequate for all but the simplest production planning and management. The modular, object-oriented model of OpenERP is amenable to enhancement by provision of a sufficiently-capable package of modules. A Production Management Module has to fill real world needs, not only for the planning of manufacturing, but also to p

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Published by: Bernd Felsche on Oct 20, 2011
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   D   R  A   F   T   D   R  A   F   T   D   R  A   F   T
Production Management Module for OpenERP
Page 1 of 9
Production Management Modulefor OpenERP
 Abstract 
Standard OpenERP MRP module has a naive view of manufacturing processes. Onethat is inadequate for all but the simplest production planning and management. Themodular, object-oriented model of OpenERP is amenable to enhancement by provision of a sufficiently-capable package of modules. A Production Management Module has to fill real world needs, not only for the planning of manufacturing, but also to provide for production tracking for closed-loop management of resources and costs. Identification of the relevant objects is necessary from the perspective of potentialusers. The resulting implementation will be sufficiently flexible to support theirrequirements while remaining simple enough to use by all potential users, includingthose without ambitions of planning and tracking every conceivable detail.The complexity of production modelling accommodates the user's needs without imposing unwarranted complexity. Complexity grows or shrinks according to thedefinition of the production model.
 Analysis of Requirements
Manufacturing, even with
continuous flow
, is comprised of discrete jobs (or batches) to satisfyproduction orders, typically in response to a customer order or to make
stock 
for subsequent sale orinternal demand.
Jobs
are comprised of
operations
that combine
facilities
at specified
locations
applying
capabilities
to
materials
to produce the nominal product.Production planning and management require scheduling of jobs for capacity planning, estimated job costs and the collection of resource usage statistics during the running of a job.
Operations
Operations describe what is to be done.All manufacturing is based on a linked set of operations that transform
materials
by employing
facilities
to perform the nominated transformation at one or more locations. Facilities combineefforts within an operation to perform transformations.Operations may be initially defined by the required capabilities and the quantities of the respectivecapabilities. Scheduling operations assigns appropriate facilities as required.The combination of facilities make up a notional work centre and material flows through thosefacilities make up an operation.Operations complete when all inputs have accepted the required quantities and all outputs havedrained.
Copyright © 2011 Bernd Felsche, Innovative Reckoning, Western Australia
2011-09-12 v83
 
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Production Management Module for OpenERP
Page 2 of 9
The central operation in the figure uses facility
A
along with facilities
P
1
and
P
2
as crew. Crew arelocated at facility
A
's location node
C
, which is relative to the facility and private to the operation.Facility
A
has further nodes that are visible externally to the operation;
N
by which material arrives,
W
by which water is provided,
E
by which electricity (
V
) is connected,
M
by which product isdelivered and
S
by which by-products drain.A transport operation is described at node
M
, where the facility
F
(a forklift) crewed by facility
P
3
and connected a
F
's private node
C
. The operation takes product from node
M
and delivers it tonode
H
, a warehouse location. The warehouse may have other locations, but those aren't
relevant 
inthe planning of this job so they do not require definition. Note that the transport operation has anode
X
, by which the forklift is refuelled. That is an example of how one could track and/orprovision fuel and the time required to refuel.Electricity and water supplies are
“infinite”
resources in this case, but still metered. One still has toconnect, but no further efforts are required.
Production Operations
Production Operations can only commence when all the necessary facilities, sufficient inputmaterials are at the appropriate location(s) and the facilities at the outputs have sufficient capacitiesto accept output materials.
Set-Up and Tear-Down Operations
Set-Up Operations are available to build each Work Centre required for Production Operations. Thenominal product of the Set-Up Operations is the Production Operation.All Set-Up Operations for a Work Centre must be complete before production materials can flowinto the corresponding production operation.
Copyright © 2011 Bernd Felsche, Innovative Reckoning, Western Australia
2011-09-12 v83
 
 Figure 1: Operations and other Objects
 
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Production Management Module for OpenERP
Page 3 of 9
Tear-Down Operations are available to dismantle a Work Centre after the Production Operation hasbeen completed.These operations describe the required tasks, allow for allocation of resources and account formaterials, times and costs during the actual running of a job.
Jobs
Jobs combine operations into a managed, coherent structure for manufacturing.Jobs correspond to production orders; potential or real. Potential jobs are for planning and trialcosting/scheduling, providing scope for accurate quoting and facilities planning.Figure 2 shows an example of material flows between operations, which may split and later, merge.This (grossly-simplified) notional example is a subset of motor car production, commencing at thelast paint-dip process, proceeding to bake, and then to disassembly of
“flaps”
(movable doors,luggage compartment and engine lids). This is done so that the paint finish matches precisely, butallows the fitting of various components to different sub-assemblies in parallel. Once all the sub-assemblies are completed, the correct flaps are mounted back onto the matching vehicle body priorto subsequent assembly.
 Note that it is not the intent of this module to schedule a matching of individual production tags forassembly.
Such is however possible with other (potential) modules by reference to the productioninformation (serial/batch numbers or internal production identifiers) collected by the module while jobs run.
Draft jobs
Draft jobs are the core of production planning. Operations are connected so that, when fullyplanned, all the internal connections for materials are satisfied, planning for the internal flow ofmaterials. Draft jobs provide templates for application to the live environment.Changes to job structures are version-managed to implement e.g. Engineering Change Orders(ECO).
Planning jobs
A planning job is a temporary job produced when testing a draft job against production data in thesystem, without consuming or allocating any facilities or materials. Planning jobs have a
use-by
date. Planners can verify production feasibility and estimated costs at the time that the test isapplied.Scheduled operation times and locations can be manipulated on planning jobs and re-tested. Suchchanges do not roll back to the draft job from which the planning job was created.
Copyright © 2011 Bernd Felsche, Innovative Reckoning, Western Australia
2011-09-12 v83
 
 Figure 2: Job Material Flows

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