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A Savage Empire; Trappers, Traders, Tribes, and the Wars That Made America

A Savage Empire; Trappers, Traders, Tribes, and the Wars That Made America

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A surprising and sweeping history that reveals the fur trade to be the driving force behind conquest, colonization, and revolution in early AmericaCombining the epic saga of Hampton Sides's Blood and Thunder with the natural history of Mark Kurlansky’s Cod, popular historian Alan Axelrod reveals the astonishingly vital role a small animal—the beaver—played in the creation of our nation. The author masterfully relays a story often neglected by conventional histories: how lust for fur trade riches moved monarchs and men to launch expeditions of discovery, finance massive corporate enterprises, and wage war. Deftly weaving cultural and military narratives, the author chronicles how Spanish, Dutch, French, English, and Native American tribes created and betrayed alliances based on trapping and trade disputes, producing a surprisingly complex series of loyalties that endured throughout the Revolution and beyond.  
A surprising and sweeping history that reveals the fur trade to be the driving force behind conquest, colonization, and revolution in early AmericaCombining the epic saga of Hampton Sides's Blood and Thunder with the natural history of Mark Kurlansky’s Cod, popular historian Alan Axelrod reveals the astonishingly vital role a small animal—the beaver—played in the creation of our nation. The author masterfully relays a story often neglected by conventional histories: how lust for fur trade riches moved monarchs and men to launch expeditions of discovery, finance massive corporate enterprises, and wage war. Deftly weaving cultural and military narratives, the author chronicles how Spanish, Dutch, French, English, and Native American tribes created and betrayed alliances based on trapping and trade disputes, producing a surprisingly complex series of loyalties that endured throughout the Revolution and beyond.  

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Publish date: Dec 6, 2011
Added to Scribd: Oct 21, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/04/2014

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THOMAS DUNNE BOOKS.n imprint of t. artin’s ress.A SAVAGE EMPIRE. Copyright ©  by lan xelrod. ll rights reserved. rinted in thenited tates of merica. For information, address t. artin’s ress, 7 Fifth venue,ew York, .Y. . www.thomasdunnebooks.com  www.stmartins.com esign by hil azzoneLibrary of Congress Cataloging-in-ublication ataxelrod, lan, –  savage empire : trappers, traders, tribes, and the wars that made merica / lanxelrod.—st ed.p. cm.ncludes bibliographical references and index. 7--3-766- (alk. paper). Fur trade—orth merica—istory—7th century. . Fur trade—orthmerica—istory—th century. 3. Fur traders—orth merica—istory— 7th century. . Fur traders—orth merica—istory—th century. . nitedtates—istory—Colonial period, ca. 6—77. 6. nited tates—istory— evolution, 77–73. . itle..6 3'.6—dc3677First dition: ecember    7 6   3  
 
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The Middle Ground
F
ROM 1492 TO 1580,
the year hilip , king of Castile and ra-gon, united for the time being the bulk of pain with ortugal, therebyconsolidating the vast ew World holdings of all beria, pain held a mo-nopoly on merican conquest and thereby came to control the largestempire in geographical extent the planet has ever known. Founded mainly on agriculture, the cultivation of cotton, sugar, and tobacco, and the rais-ing of cattle, it was maintained by slaves, black as well as ndian. he em-pire was based on slave labor in one form or another, yet the lure that drewpain westward was neither vegetative nor fleshly, but metallic overlaidwith something resembling divinity. riving the many panish voyagesinto the sunset lands was gold, gold plated with the thinnest layer of od.ever mind that few of the panish expeditions actually returned withthe coveted ore.  handful of discoveries was quite sufficient to inspiremany more, the most seductive of which were those of ernán Cortés.When in  he landed a small force at what is today eracruz, exico,he was greeted by ambassadors of the ztec king ontezuma , who boredazzling gifts, mostly of gold. oubtless, they were intended to appeasethe newcomer. Cortés, however, was anything but sated.“end me some more of it,” he reportedly told ontezuma’s minions,

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