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Denver Post Solitary Confinement

Denver Post Solitary Confinement

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Published by Tlecoz Huitzil

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Published by: Tlecoz Huitzil on Oct 23, 2011
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10/23/2011

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Guest Commentary: What's wrongwith solitary confinement?
By Mark W. Diamond
 POSTED: 05/20/2011 01:00:00 AM MDT
Close your eyes for a moment and imagine that you've been alone for years and years, lying on a cold,concrete slab, in a stark windowless room, with virtually no human to communicate with - except yourself.Imagine being locked behind a solid steel door, in a space, tighter than most bathrooms, for 23 of every 24hours. In hour 24, you go into a "vented dog run;" that's your only exercise. Imagine how the most resilientindividual might react to this existence; to permanent bright lighting, extreme temperatures and forcedinsomnia. Imagine, too, the most vulnerable: inmates with serious mental illness.There's often little sympathy for the incarcerated and even less for those who find themselves in long-termsolitary confinement. We often think they must have done something heinous to not only be in prison, butin the bleakest part of a prison: solitary confinement, isolation, permanent lockdown, the hole.As the former Chief of Psychiatry for the Colorado Department of Corrections, with responsibility for directing the psychiatric care of inmates around the state, I can tell you that solitary confinement doesn'tplay out like we imagine it from popular media. It doesn't always house only "the worst of the worst." In myexperience, the smallest infraction can end with a solitary placement. It's not a 30-day experience like thatoften shown on television; inmates typically serve two, three, or more years in solitary. There are novictories; no Shawshank Redemption. Solitary confinement is not redemptive. For many, it's cruel andunusual punishment. And warehousing prisoners who are mentally ill in solitary confinement, well, that's just a losing proposition.It's ineffective, it's inhumane, and its costs are higher than most Coloradans know.In this legislative session, a bill was passed that made some limited changes to the landscape of solitaryconfinement. Senate Bill 176 establishes a new earned time provision and changes the definition of asecurity threat group. But what we need is change that affects those prisoners with serious mental illness;changes that begin right at the cell front door that separates a prisoner who is mentally ill from both sanityand humanity.The time for these changes is now.As a medical professional with intimate knowledge of the state's network of prisons and prisoners, I knowthat solitary confinement of prisoners who are mentally ill is a problem that should command the state'simmediate attention - and action.Nearly 1,500 of Colorado's 23,000 inmates are currently housed in what is officially called "administrativesegregation." About 37 percent of those inmates have been diagnosed as mentally ill or developmentallydisabled (a far higher percentage than found in the general population). For them, "ad seg" is hell. Their mental health conditions deteriorate. They act out in ways that speak to the sensory deprivation of beingdenied human contact. They imagine suicide -- and homicide. They get no better; they get worse.There is not enough prison staff to meet the needs of all the inmates with mental illness in solitary.Perhaps that is because there are just too many inmates with mental illness.Overtaxed staff who fail to communicate with them about the "little things" all too often find problemsescalating - and then wonder why. Staff finds themselves facing violence when those cell doors finallyopen.The prison sentence is enough; it's short-sighted to make things worse by placing the mentally ill in solitaryconfinement. It hurts prison staff, it hurts prisoners and it hurts all who live in the state of Colorado.Instead of solitary confinement, these prisoners need mental health care. They need a step-down processso that they are not released directly from solitary to the streets. We all need policy that reduces recidivismand leads to success on the "outside." Though these changes did not happen in this legislative session,
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Page 1of 5Guest Commentary: What's wrong with solitary confinement? -The Denver Post10/23/2011http://www.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_18098132
 
they MUST happen.It's been proven that the extended solitary confinement of mentally ill prisoners is creating a much bigger problem for Colorado than the state ever imagined.You must take action now to mitigate it.
Dr. Mark W. Diamond, who operates a private forensic psychiatry practice in Lake Oswego, Oregon, wasthe Colorado Department of Corrections Chief of Psychiatry from 1995-2004. EDITOR'S NOTE: This is anonline-only column and has not been edited.
 
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For those of you who aren't worried about "recidivism" consider this: You pay $28,000 ayear to incarcerate these people. One person who is rehabilitated will contributehundreds of thousands of dollars to the economy. Is revenge worth the cost?
Seth F
| 3:51 PM on Tuesday May 24 |Reply to this comment 
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Page 2of 5Guest Commentary: What's wrong with solitary confinement? -The Denver Post10/23/2011http://www.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_18098132
 
Page 3of 5Guest Commentary: What's wrong with solitary confinement? -The Denver Post10/23/2011http://www.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_18098132

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