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Housing, Class and Regeneration: Exploring the ‘new’ inequalities

Housing, Class and Regeneration: Exploring the ‘new’ inequalities

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Published by Oxfam
This paper explores issues of class-based inequalities in housing, particularly housing regeneration. It is based on finding from research into the impact of urban regeneration in Partick, Glasgow on the local working-class community. Regeneration often takes the form of gentrification, which sees the local government promote land sale and private housing developments in neighbourhoods as a strategy of dealing with social or economic problems. In addition, social housing is increasingly business-oriented. The consequences of this – which include the displacement of local residents because they find it increasingly difficult to secure a tenancy or buy a home – demonstrate the need for state investment and intervention in housing provision. This paper is part of a series of papers which have resulted from the Whose Economy? seminar series, held in Scotland in 2010 – 2011, whose purpose was to provide a space for researchers, representative organisations, policy-makers and people with experience of poverty to come together and explore the causes of poverty and inequality in today’s Scotland.
This paper explores issues of class-based inequalities in housing, particularly housing regeneration. It is based on finding from research into the impact of urban regeneration in Partick, Glasgow on the local working-class community. Regeneration often takes the form of gentrification, which sees the local government promote land sale and private housing developments in neighbourhoods as a strategy of dealing with social or economic problems. In addition, social housing is increasingly business-oriented. The consequences of this – which include the displacement of local residents because they find it increasingly difficult to secure a tenancy or buy a home – demonstrate the need for state investment and intervention in housing provision. This paper is part of a series of papers which have resulted from the Whose Economy? seminar series, held in Scotland in 2010 – 2011, whose purpose was to provide a space for researchers, representative organisations, policy-makers and people with experience of poverty to come together and explore the causes of poverty and inequality in today’s Scotland.

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Published by: Oxfam on Oct 24, 2011
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05/12/2014

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Oxfam Discussion Papers
Housing, class andregeneration: exploring the
‘new’ inequalities
 
A
Whose Economy 
Seminar Paper
Kirsteen Paton
June 2011
 
www.oxfam.org.uk
 
Housing, class and regeneration: exploring the ‘new’ inequalities
 A
Whose Economy 
Seminar Paper, June 2011
2
About the author
Dr Kirsteen Paton
is a researcher and lecturer in Sociology at the University ofGlasgow. Her main research interests are urban restructuring and stratificationand new working-class studies. She recently completed her ESRC CASE PhDstudy with West Glasgow Against Poverty (Westgap) and Oxfam:
The hiddeninjuries and hidden rewards of urban restructuring on working-class communities: a casestudy of gentrification in Partick, Glasgow
. This critically examined the impacts of
the government’s use of gentrification as a regeneration strategy on working
-class lives and community.Email:
kirsteen.paton@glasgow.ac.uk
 
Whose Economy 
Seminar Papers
are a follow up to the series of seminars held inScotland between November 2010 and March 2011. They are written to contribute to publicdebate and to invite feedback on development and policy issues. These papers are
work in
progress’ documents, and do not necessarily constitute final publications or reflect Oxfam
policy positions. The views and recommendations expressed are those of the author and notnecessarily those of Oxfam. For more information, or to comment on this paper, emailktrebeck@oxfam.org.uk
 
Housing,
class and regeneration: exploring the ‘new’ inequalities
 A
Whose Economy 
Seminar Paper, June 2011
3
Contents
Executive summary ................................................................................. 4
 
Introduction .............................................................................................. 5
 
Housing policy in historical context ....................................................... 6Contemporary housing policy: regeneration or privatisation? ............ 6
 
Case study: gentrification and regeneration policy ..................................... 7
 
Conclusion: housing and privatisation in hard times
 –
 back to the future? ................................................................................. 11
 
Notes ....................................................................................................... 12
 

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