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Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper - 28 October 2011

Morning Calm Weekly Newspaper - 28 October 2011

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This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the USAG-HUMPHREYS, APO AP 96271. Circulation: 9,500

Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with the Contracting Command-Korea. The civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation of the equal opportunity policy is corrected.

Oriental Press President: Charles Chong
Commercial Advertising
Telephone: 738-5005
Fax: (02) 790-5795
E-mail: oppress@kornet.net
Mail address: PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758
Location: Bldg. 1440, Yongsan, Main Post

SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS:
Phone: DSN 738-4068
E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly@korea.army.mil
http://www.facebook.com/usaghumphreys

This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the USAG-HUMPHREYS, APO AP 96271. Circulation: 9,500

Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with the Contracting Command-Korea. The civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation of the equal opportunity policy is corrected.

Oriental Press President: Charles Chong
Commercial Advertising
Telephone: 738-5005
Fax: (02) 790-5795
E-mail: oppress@kornet.net
Mail address: PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758
Location: Bldg. 1440, Yongsan, Main Post

SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS:
Phone: DSN 738-4068
E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly@korea.army.mil

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OCTOBER 28, 2011
OCTOBER 28, 2011 Published for those serving in the Republic of Korea Volume 10, Issue 4
Sights & Sounds
P03
Command Perspective
P04
Photo Feature Page
P16USFK News P02USAG Red Cloud P05USAG Casey P05USAG Yongsan P09USAG Humphreys P21USAG Daegu P25
 
GARRISONS
Downloading the paper from home? Try www.scribd.com/morningcalmnewsDownloading the paper from home? Try www.scribd.com/morningcalmnews
Seoul Air ShowTakes FlightPage 9Counselorof the YearPage 22 Yongsan YouthTour FirehousePage 5
 
       I     n     s       i       d     e
By Walter T. Ham IV 
Eighth Army Public Affairs
 YONGSAN GARRISON —
U.S. Forces Koreaand Eighth Army personnel took a close look at the ways that they can help safeguard important infor-mation Oct. 18–21 during an Operations Security  Analysis and Program Management Course.Service members and civilians learned how to
manage an eective OPSEC program using tech
-niques such as checking dumpsters for improperly disposed of documents.The course was taught by Chris Turner Sr. andTony Maybrier from the Joint OPSEC Support Ele-ment at the Joint Information Operations WarfareCenter in San Antonio.The Joint OPSEC Support Element traces its rootsto the Purple Dragon Team established by the U.S.
Pacic Command during the Vietnam War.
Both instructors encouraged students to regularly emphasize the importance of operations security toforce protection and mission accomplishment.“OPSEC saves lives,” said Turner, who travelsaround the world teaching OPSEC courses to De-partment of Defense personnel.Maybrier said good OPSEC also applies to themilitary family.
x
Eighth Army OPSEC Program Manager Maj. Yokeitha A. Ramey (left) and Sgt. 1st Class Anthony Adkins check thedumpsters on Yongsan for improperly disposed of items.
U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Kim Gye-myeong 
OPSEC stressed
By Hong, Seung-hui
Camp Humphreys Public Affairs
CAMP HUMPHREYS —
 Army Education Weekis scheduled for Nov. 14-18, and the Camp Hum-phreys Army Education Center is holding a series of events and briefs then to let the community know what services are available. The Theme this year is“Supporting Soldier and Family readiness”.Speakers will give information on Central TexasCollege, the University of Maryland, and the Univer-sity of Phoenix graduate school. There will also be
briengs on the Montgomery G.I. Bill, the Post-9/11G.I. Bill, nancial aid, the Army Career and Alumni
Program, and services available to spouses.To open the conference, there will be a cake-cut-ting ceremony with scholar Soldiers and Col. BryanBarker, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, and the bri-gade’s senior enlisted Soldier, Command Sgt. Maj.Leeford Cain. Light refreshments will be served.
Beverly M. Suenaga, education services ocer,
said, “The purpose of the event is celebrating andhonoring Soldiers who have had remarkable aca-demic achievement.”The Army Education Center’s primary goal is tomake Soldiers better leaders through learning, andNancy J. Claycomb, an education counselor, said the week will highlight the choices service members andtheir Families have.“What a good opportunity,” she said. “ We have a variety classes such as business courses, criminal jus-tice and so on.”Education Center personnel help Soldiers, Family members, civilians, and retirees who want to furthertheir education. For more Information, call Clay-
comb at 753-8902 or Suenaga at 753-8905.
x
Education Week to highlight services available
Watch what you throw away
 
NEWS • PAGE 2
THE MORNING CALM
NEWS
The Morning Calm
Published byInstallation Management Command
USAG-RED CLOUDCommander: Col. Hank DodgePublic Affairs Ofcer: Kevin JacksonWriter/Editor: Franklin FisherStaff Writers: Pfc. Mardicio Barrot, Pvt. Yi, Jae-gwang USAG-YONGSANCommander:
Col. William P. Huber
Public Affairs Ofcer: Mark Abueg CI Ofcer: Jane LeeLayout Editor: Sgt. Hong Moo-sunStaff Writers: Staff Sgt. Cody Harding, Pfc. ChoiSung-il, Pfc. Han Samuel,USAG-HUMPHREYSCommander: Col. Joseph P. MoorePublic Affairs Ofcer: Ed JohnsonCI Ofcer: Steven HooverWriter/Editor: Wayne MarlowStaff Writer: Pfc. Han Jae-hoUSAG-DAEGUCommander: Col. Kathleen A. GavlePublic Affairs Ofcer: Philip MolterCI Ofcer: Mary GrimesStaff Writers: Pvt. Bang Bong-joo, Sgt. Kim Min-jaeInterns: Park Min-jin, Lee Sae-mi,, Lee Seung-bin,Raven Calloway
This Army newspaper is an authorized publication formembers of the Department of Defense. Contents of TheMorning Calm Weekly are not necessarily ofcial viewsof, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial contentof this weekly publication is the responsibility of U.S. ArmyGarrisons in Korea. Circulation: 9,500Printed by Oriental Press, a private rm in no way connectedwith the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contractwith the Contracting Command-Korea. The civilian printeris responsible for commercial advertising. The appearanceof advertising in this publication, including inserts orsupplements, does not constitute endorsement by theU.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or servicesadvertised. Everything advertised in this publication shallbe made available for purchase, use or patronage withoutregard to race, religion, gender, national origin, age, maritalstatus, physical handicap, political afliation, or any othernon-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If aviolation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy byan advertiser is conrmed, the printer shall refuse to printadvertising from that source until the violation of the equalopportunity policy is corrected.Oriental Press President: Charles Chong Commercial Advertising Telephone: 738-5005Fax: (02) 790-5795E-mail: oppress@kornet.netMail address: PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758Location: Bldg. 1440, Yongsan, Main PostSUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS:Phone: DSN 738-4068E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly@korea.army.mil
Submitting to The Morning Calm Weekly Send Letters to the Editor, guest commentaries,story submissions and other items:MorningCalmWeekly@korea.army.mil.For all submitted items include a point of con-tact name and telephone number. All items aresubject to editing for content and to ensure they conform with DoD guidelines.
 Visit us online
The Morning Calm
 www.scribd.com/morningcalmnews
By Master Sgt. Aki Summers
Field Operating Base Korea
 YONGSAN GARRISON —
I wasdiagnosed with Stage I Cancer on Jan.3, at age 35. I had no family history of this disease, nor any symptoms. Also,I have never smoked nor drank alco-holic beverages. One would think theodds were low with my history, but thetruth is that one in three persons willget some form of cancer during theirlifetime, according to the courtesy of National Cancer Foundation. This is why I am sharing my story with you. As we celebrate Breast Cancer Aware-ness this month, we should look at do-ing what we can to prevent this disease
from aecting our families.
Since being diagnosed, my lifestyleand the nutritional value in foods havebecome a focal point for me. I had acarcinoid tumor in my small intes-tine, which had grown over the course
of ve to seven years to the size of a
small golf ball. Thankfully, it was suc-cessfully removed in February and Iam still very thankful to Dr. Inae of the121st Medical Hospital. The tumor’sremoval was a bid to prevent a recur-rence of the tumor and subsequentspreading. I had to undergo a com-plete lifestyle change, especially with
my diet. Given the slight improvementon the Chromagratin A (CGA) bloodtest, which was from 131 to 99 from the
month of March to May, my healthy eating habits have contributed great-ly toward living and being healthier.Being a survivor in the third stage of cancer, I am certain that I am on my 
 way to achieving the normal CGA test, which is normally from 20 to 94, but is
there any relationship between nutri-tion and cancer, or does cancer ema-
nate from genetic factors? Scientic
groups have studied the nutritional value of food with regard to preven-tion of cancer as well as heart disease.Researchers Walter Willett and PatrickSkerrett allege that reviewing the nu-tritional value in foods and the way it
aects health, especially on people suf 
-fering from cancer and cardiovasculardiseases, helps to substantiate the im-portance of verifying nutritional valueof every meal served, since there are anumber of contradictory views derivedfrom various nutritionists’ studies. My focus and attention to each of you isrelaying the importance of the diseaseof cancer. My personal experience inrelation to cancer plays a very crucialrole in the substantiating facts belowabout cancer.Cancer emanates from uncon-trolled growth of cells, which eventu-ally destroy the genes. The spread of the tumor is facilitated by the presenceof blood or lymph nodes throughout
the body. Given the high prevalencerate of cancer, various scientic stud
-ies have delved into the study of iden-tifying the very person who is at riskof being infected with cancer. Basingmy knowledge on the inference of MITcancer researcher Robert Weinberg, who cites that the presence of foreignbodies, including smoke from tobacco,as well as internal origin play a majorrole in damaging DNA cells, I am in aposition of evaluating the real cause of cancer in my life. The fact that I havenever smoked and cancer does not runin my family eliminates the hereditary factors as well as the presence of for-
Nutrition can help battle cancer 
eign bodies from smoke in relation tocancer in my life. Willett and Patrick assert that nu-trition plays a key role in eradicatingthe cancer as well as heart disease.However, eradicating cancer and heartdisease has faced contradictory infer-ences, as some nutritionists are of the view that proper eating habits revolvearound taking foods that serve the roleof improving the health status as op-posed to shedding weight.Therefore, consumption of fruitsand vegetables in plenty is recom-mended because they contain pho-tochemicals, which play a key role ineliminating toxins emanating fromconsumption of inorganic foods as
 well as rened oils that we consume in
our day-to-day life.High protein foods, on the otherhand, are discouraged because they facilitate the growth of tumors if con-sumed in amounts above that required.Therefore, much emphasis should beput on consuming cruciferous vegeta-bles, as they are rich in sulforaphaneas well as isothiocyanates chemicals, which play a crucial role in preventionof cancer.Tomatoes, peaches, grapefruits, wa-termelon, and papaya should also beconsumed in abundance, since the ly-copene chemical found in them playsa crucial role in preventing oxidativedamage, thus reducing the chancesof being infected with cancer. Moreso, even though much has not beencredited to grapes, onions, and apples,they contribute greatly in decreasingchances of being infected with canceras well as heart disease, since they are
rich in photochemical known as ava
-noids.Remember the old saying, “You are what you eat”? Well, everyone needsto incorporate sugar in their diet. How-ever, the type of sugar that my family and I consume should only come fromorganic sugar or healthy sweeteners,
since rened sugar attracts growth
of tumors. This lifestyle change nowmakes me more aware of what my fam-ily and I must eat to stay healthy andfor me to stay in remission.
Given the current policy of provid
-ing information concerning nutrition-al value and the amount of calories inmeals, key questions still remain: how
much eort do you put in verifying the
nutritional value of chemicals withindiverse fruits and vegetables with re-gard to control of cancer? What caneach of you do to further educate your-selves on the disease that continues toincrease in numbers amongst us? Edu-cate yourselves. Ensure you are eatinga proper healthy diet rich in fruit and vegetables, getting a good night’s rest,and exercising at least three times a
 week for 30 to 45 minutes. Healthy eat
-ing and positive life style changes arekey to possibly preventing cancer fromstriking you or a loved one.
x
 Air Force Master Sgt. Aki Sum-mers is the Superintendent of Field Operating Base – Korea (FOB-K).This spring, shortly after being di-agnosed she started a cancer sup- port page on Face book in hopes of  getting and sharing information with others so that it may make a
dierence in someone’s life. It canbe accessed at http://on..me/
uer1ya
 Air Force Master Sgt.
 Aki Summers, after being diagnosed with cancer, started a support page on Facebook. It can be accessed at http://on.fb.me/uer1ya
 
Courtesy photo
 
OCTOBER 28, 2011
CULTURE
NEWS • PAGE 3
 SIGHTS AND SOUNDS: Off–post events and activities
Source: http://www.seoulselection.com; www.korea.net, http://english.tour2korea.com, www.visitseoul.net — No endorsement implied.
Police Blotter
The following entries were ex-cerpted from the police blottersthe previous week. These entriesmay be incomplete and do notimply guilt or innocence.
 Area I AWOL.
The subject failedto report to his place of duty atthe designated time. The subject was placed on AWOL status by 
his unit commander, agged in
DBIDS and a Be on the Lookoutorder was issued for his appre-hension.
Drunk and Disorderly Con-duct.
The subject was intoxicat-ed and belligerent at a private lo-cation in Seoul. The subject wasapprehended and transported tothe PMO where he was adminis-
tered a PBT with a result of 0.306
percent blood alcohol content.The subject was released to hisunit and later reported to thePMO where he was advised of hislegal rights, which he invoked.
 Area II
Trac Accident with In
- juries; Damage to Property;
Driving Under the Inuence of 
an Intoxicant; Driving Wrong Way on One Way Street.
The
subject, while operating a POV under the inuence of an intoxi
-cant, crossed into the incoming
lane and struck the victims POV 
at his residence in Seoul. KNP re-sponded to the scene and testedthe subjects BAC with a result
of 0.071 percent. The subject
sustained injuries consisting of an abrasion and scratches to hishead. The victim sustained in- juries consisting of abrasions tohis back and neck. Damage tothe subject’s vehicle consisted of disabling damage to the hood,under carriage and entire frontportion of the vehicle. Damageto the victim’s vehicle consistedof disabling damage to the frontportion of the vehicle.
 Area III
 Wrongful Destruction of 
Government Property.
Un-
known person(s), by unknown
means, caused damage to the victim’s truck which was securedand unattended in a parking lot
on USAG-Humphreys. Damage
to the truck consisted of dents tothe right rear door and windowshattered.
Larceny of Private Property.
Unknown person(s) removed the
 victims sunglasses, which wereunsecured and unattended, from
the front desk of USAG-Hum
-phreys Lodge. The victim thenlooked over the security camerafootage and stated he saw a manin a yellow short-sleeve shirt thathe believed to have taken thesunglasses. The victim rendereda written sworn statement attest-ing to the incident. Investigationcontinues by MPI.
Seoul Walking Trails
The City of Seoul has website,ecoinfo.seoul.go.kr, where one can
nd all the walking paths that ex
-ist throughout the city. Although it isonly in Korean, English readers canmake use of the satellite imagery and
illustrations. Up to 110 trails have beendocumented on the site under ve cat
-egories: culture and history-themedroutes; trails based on nature and ecol-ogy; greenway paths; forested trails;and village trails.There are links to ecological infor-
mation systems, GPS data, Google
open API, and other information, andthe user can zoom in and out of thesatellite images.The launch of the site is part of alarger project in which mountain hik-ing routes are being constructed andupgraded and is due for completion
in 2014. According to the plan, Seoul’s
four innermost mountains will be
linked by a 20-kilometer-long culture
and history-themed trail.The city’s outermost mountains
(excluding Mt. Deogyangsan), will be
connected by a 182-kilometer-long na-ture and ecology route. Of the forestedpaths, some of the more popular onesto hike are the Jiyangsan forest path,
Gangdong Greenway, and Geungyosan
forest path.
 Jeju Walking Festival (Nov. 9-12)
If taking leave in November, the Jeju Olle Walking Festival makes fora great destination. It is an organized walk that unfolds on scenic roads on Jeju Island, the most popular tourismdestination in Korea.Participants walk along outstand-ing sights, a mixture of numeroussmall volcanic mountains, the coasts,and stone walls. During the festival,each village on the walking path greetsparticipants with delicious local foodand a colorful array of traditional per-formances. Participants will completeone course of the Jeju Olle courseseach day and experience diverse cul-tural events.The festival begin last year and willcontinue to be hosted every November.For more information, visit thehomepage of Jeju Olle Walking Festi-
 val and apply online: http://www.olle
-
 walking.co.kr/english/
 Yangcheon: The Last Hyanggyo
Of all the old structures in Seoul,there is only one remaining Hyang-gyo, which is a Joseon-era Confuciantemple, school, and shrine.Hyanggos were government-runprovincial establishments during the
Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) and JoseonDynasty (July 1392 - August 1910).
The last remaining hyanggy is
called Yangcheon – and it is 600 years
old. It is from the Joseon era, used asa temple, school, and a memorial hallto honor distinguished scholars andstatesmen. It was one of the top edu-cational institutes where talents weretrained by master instructors.It was also a place where culturalrelics were well-preserved, and, there-fore, still exist today.
The Seoul Metropolitan Govern
-ment deemed Yangcheon a cultural
relic in 1963, and the government
 vows to preserve this school forever-more as it’s the only one that remains.
 Yancheon is located at Gangseo-gu,Gayang-dong 234 (Hyanggyo-gil 50),below Gungsan (Mt. Gung) and faces
south.
Natural History Museum
Surrounded by sea on all sides,Busan in South Korea has always beeninterested in marine life. This led tothe establishment of the Busan Ma-rine Natural History Museum on June
10, 1994. The museum highlights thesignicance of biological diversity by 
collecting, preserving, classifying, dis-playing, experimenting on, research-ing, studying and exhibiting items re-lated to marine life and marine naturalhistory.
The Museum exhibits about 21,000sea items from 100 nations and this
marine museum has become the cen-tral axis of a network of all the mari-time museums in the country. Formore information, visit the website at
sea.busan.go.kr/english or call the mu
-
seum at (051) 553-4944.
Namsangol Pavilion: A Traditional Place to Romp
 The Cheonugak is found at the Namsangol Hanok Village, an attraction in Seoul that has been preserved to appear as a typi-cal Korean village looked during the Joseon Dynasty. The Joseon Dynasty was a sovereign state lasting from 1392 to 1897 . This Cheonugak represents a public gathering place where Koreans from the Joseon Dynasty era would meet for a meal, musicand dance. Admission to Namsangol Hanok Village is free, and the site can be found outside of Chungmulo Station off exits3 and 4. — U.S. Army photo by Russell Wicke

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