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The History of Rome V

The History of Rome V

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The History of Rome, Vol. V
Livy
Table of Contents
The History of Rome, Vol. V..............................................................................................................................1

Livy..........................................................................................................................................................1 Book 33. The Second Macedonian War..................................................................................................1 Book 34. Close of the Macedonian War................................................................................................23 Book 35. Antiochus in Greece...............................................................................................................51 Book 36. War Against Antiochus\u2212First Stage.......................................................................................74 Book 37. Final Defeat of Antiochus......................................................................................................95 Book 38. Arraignment of Scipio Africanus.........................................................................................124 Book 39. The Bacchanalia in Rome and Italy.....................................................................................155

The History of Rome, Vol. V
i
The History of Rome, Vol. V
Livy
Translated by Reverend Canon Roberts
This page copyright \u00a9 2001 Blackmask Online.
http://www.blackmask.com
Book 33. The Second Macedonian War
\u2022
Book 34. Close of the Macedonian War
\u2022
Book 35. Antiochus in Greece
\u2022
Book 36. War Against Antiochus\u2212First Stage
\u2022
Book 37. Final Defeat of Antiochus
\u2022
Book 38. Arraignment of Scipio Africanus
\u2022
Book 39. The Bacchanalia in Rome and Italy
\u2022
Book 33. The Second Macedonian War

The above\u2212described events took place in the winter. At the commencement of spring Quinctius, anxious to
make the Boeotians, who were uncertain which side to take, into a Roman dependency, summoned Attalus to
Elatia, and marching through Phocis fixed his camp at a point five miles from Thebes, the Boeotian capital.
The following day, escorted by a single maniple and accompanied by Attalus and the various deputations
who had flocked to him from all quarters, he proceeded to the city. The hastati of the legion, numbering 2000
men, were ordered to follow him at a distance of one mile. About half\u2212way he was met by Antiphilus, the
captain\u2212general of the Boeotians; the population of the city were on the walls, anxiously watching the
approach of the Roman general and the king. They saw few arms and few soldiers with them, the hastati, who
were following a mile behind, were hidden by the windings of the road and the undulating nature of the
terrain. As he came nearer to the city he slackened his pace, as though he were saluting the crowds who had
come out to meet him, but really to allow the hastati to catch him up. The townsfolk pushing along in a mass
in front of the lictor did not see the armed column which had hurried up until they reached the general's
quarters. Then they were utterly dismayed, as they believed that the city had been betrayed and captured
through the treachery of Antiphilus. It was quite clear that the Council of Boeotia which was summoned for
the next day would have no chance of unfettered deliberation. They concealed their vexation, since to have
exhibited it would have been useless and dangerous.

Attalus was the first to speak in the council. He began by recounting the services which he had rendered to
Greece as a whole and in particular to the Boeotians. But he was too old and infirm to stand the strain of
public speaking, and suddenly became silent and fell down. Whilst they were removing the king, who had
lost the use of one side, the proceedings were suspended. Aristaenus, the chief magistrate of the Achaeans,
was the next to speak, and he spoke with all the more weight because he gave the Boeotians the same advice
which he had given to the Achaeans. Quinctius himself added a few remarks, in which he dwelt more upon
the good faith of the Romans and their sense of honour than upon their arms and resources. Dicaearchus of
Plataea next brought forward a motion in favour of alliance with Rome. When its terms had been recited no
one ventured to oppose it, consequently it was passed by the unanimous vote of the cities of Boeotia. After
the council broke up Quinctius only stayed in Thebes as long as Attalus' sudden attack made it necessary, and
as soon as he saw that there was no immediate danger to life but only powerlessness in the limbs, he left him

The History of Rome, Vol. V
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