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Nato Cals Handbook (Aquisition and Life Cycle)1 June 2009

Nato Cals Handbook (Aquisition and Life Cycle)1 June 2009

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Published by: Γιάννης on Oct 31, 2011
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04/30/2012

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NATO CALS HANDBOOK
June 2000 Version 2
 
 
NATO CALS Handbook, Version 2, June 2000
ES-
i
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The NATO CALS Office (NCO) published Draft 2 of the NATO CALS Handbook inJanuary 1996. That product has been circulated around the world and has been translated byother nations into their native language. This in itself shows the interest and desire by nationsand associated industry to learn and use the CALS concept. This version extends and updatesDraft 2.The NCO views this handbook as a living document. To meet that objective, the NCO hasmade this a Web-based product to be continuously updated as new information becomesavailable.A summary of the contents of the NATO CALS Handbook Draft 2 follows.
SECTION ONE: INTRODUCTION
This section sets the stage. It begins with a succinct definition and background for CALS andlooks at the challenges faced by decision-makers. The military, industry, and multinationalprogram perspective for CALS is addressed next.A basic tenet of CALS is that information is an asset. From the Defense System (DS)perspective, technical information is a vital asset required to support the DS across itslifecycle. Accordingly, this section closes with an overview of the Staged Process forThrough Life Information Management (TLIM), which is the central theme for the remainderof the handbook.
SECTION TWO: STAGE 1: DEVELOPING A THROUGH LIFE INFORMATIONMANAGEMENT STRATEGY
This section describes the process for developing a Through Life Information Management(TLIM) Strategy. A careful examination of the business and IT environment in which theprogram will operate is conducted and an assessment of the options for adding value from aShared Data Environment (SDE) is made. Alternative options are then examined in relationto their ability to contribute to achieving business goals and using cost/benefit and risk management techniques. The culmination of this process is the strategy for designing,developing and implementing TLIM within an organization.
SECTION THREE: STAGE 2: DEVELOPING A THROUGH LIFE INFORMATIONMANAGEMENT PLAN
The goal of this section is to provide the tools needed to build an Information ManagementPlan (IMP). The IMP is a comprehensive document used to support the intended programbusiness strategy as developed in Stage 1. The IMP should address both government andindustrial requirements and be under program management control throughout the life-cycle.All parties (NATO, nations, armed services, contractors, etc.) must agree to the IMP. Themethodology and content of the IMP is fully developed in this section.
SECTION FOUR: STAGE 3: IMPLEMENTING A SHARED DATA ENVIRONMENT
After the IMP is developed it is time to get physical. Today, most of the DS technicalinformation required to support program operations is created and managed within theindustrial infrastructure. In addition, a NATO/Multi-national infrastructure is needed tomanage this information throughout NATO and nations. TLIM using a Shared DataEnvironment (SDE) concept is designed to help address these problems.
 
 
NATO CALS Handbook, Version 2, June 2000
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 Implementation of a SDE or the best alternative is accomplished through the execution of theprogram IMP described in the previous section. This section is intended to provide theproject manager with an understanding of what makes up an SDE and give him theinformation needed to implement an SDE.
SECTION FIVE: STAGE 4: MANAGING INFORMATION THROUGH LIFE
This section addresses the role and responsibilities associated with managing DS information.The goal is to provide correct information to the right user, when it is needed, where it isneeded, and in the form it is needed.The program manager (PM) will need to assign information management responsibilitieswithin the program office. The PM can assign information management to one or moreprogram office members as an "other duty as assigned" or recruit a dedicated InformationManager (IM) to the team. Information management, like configuration, security and changemanagement, is the responsibility of program management and is an integral part of the IMP.
SECTION SIX: MODELS
This section presents three different concepts (NATO CALS Through Life Business Model(TLBM), NATO CALS Data Model (NCDM) and Life-Cycle Cost (LCC)) designed to helpimplement the NATO CALS concept.The TLBM is a tool to help decision-makers manage change. It presents a vision of howNATO can improve its acquisition and logistics process for multinational programs bymaking best use of information technology over the life-cycle of a DS.The NCDM is a formal description of the data required to support the logistics process for theacquisition and support of major systems.LCC looks at the total cost of ownership of a process, system, or piece of equipment. Forinstallation of new equipment, a LCC analysis can assist in deciding which options add themost economic benefits to the program.
SECTION SEVEN: TOOLS
This section provides an overview of the selection of user tools. Acquiring proper tools is asimportant as designing and implementing the Shared Data Environment. These tools are anintegral part for providing connectivity with a common basis for sharing DS information inready-to-use formats. It is important to note that data stored within the SDE is useless unlessit can be extracted, analyzed, manipulated, updated, formatted, and presented in a userfriendly manner by the appropriate software application tool.In parallel with the analysis used to determine the SDE requirements, tool selection must beconsidered within the SDE context. The ideal situation is to provide an environment thatseparates information from applications and is based on open system standards. This willhelp ensure future flexibility in upgrading to new software solutions as technology evolves.
SECTION EIGHT: TECHNIQUES
This section provides a series of techniques to be used as aids when implementing CALS. Itbegins with a discussion on performing a "Through Life Business Case Analysis." It thenleads to a discussion on other CALS techniques such as Change Management, developing a

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